Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


Graduate Certificate in Health Care Ethics


Approved Courses

The Certificate program’s requirements consists of four courses: three discipline-based courses and one capstone course. At least one of the discipline-based courses must be from a humanities discipline, and at least one must be from a social sciences discipline; the third discipline-based course may be from either a humanities or a social sciences discipline. The fourth required course is an cross-disciplinary, team-taught capstone course.

Participating students complete their four-course sequence from a list of approved courses. Students should explore the full range of multi-disciplinary topics available within the list of approved courses, including those offered through the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the Graduate School of Social Service, Master's in Humanities and Sciences, and the School of Law.


Course Descriptions (by Departments):

»  Philosophy
»  Sociology and Anthropology
»  Psychology
»  Biological Sciences
»  Law School
»  The Graduate School of Social Service
»  The Center for Ethics Education

spring 2014 course offerings         
Coure No.
Course Title
Instructor

 

    Campus
CEED 6100
Theories and Applications
Fried     RH
CEED 6290 Health Disparities and Social Inequalities
Fisher     RH
CEED 6000 Health Care Ethics Capstone Course Fried     TBA
PHIL 5114 Normative Ethical Theories
Strabbing      LC
BISC 7532
Conservation Law and Policy
Clark      LC
SOCI 6101
Contemporary Social Theory

McCarthy

    LC
JUGL 0347 Jewish Law Sinclair     LC
SWGS 6050 Human Rights and Social Justice Maschi     LC

Philosophy
PHIL 5003: Natural Law Ethics
The tradition of natural law ethics includes a rather wide variety of theories. From its origins natural law thinking has attempted to identify and defend an objective and intelligible basis for morality by concentrating on human nature, especially in terms of its structures and teleology. For some, the natural law refers primarily to a higher law by which to measure the justice of human institutions and civil legislation. Some thinkers have called on natural law in order to defend the natural rights of individuals. Others prefer to use it to understand what makes agents morally virtuous and what the goal of human development is. What unites these many views under a common title is the appeal to nature as in certain ways normative for human behavior. An important aim of this course is to acquaint the student with a variety of theories that fall under the heading of natural law ethics and the different sorts of problems they are designed to address. A second aim is to exemplify the application of the natural law/natural rights tradition to current moral problems. Given the important theological uses made of the natural moral law, a third aim is to explore some connections between philosophical and theological approaches to ethics by considering of certain recent papal encyclicals.

PHIL 5014: Modern Ethical Theories
This course is an introductory survey of major theories and themes in twentieth-century moral philosophy, beginning with the British intuitionists, emotivism, neo-Hobbesian theory, and the development of utilitarianism. We will focus on arguments against moral egoism, and on contemporary neo-Kantian or deontological critiques of utilitarianism. This course does not cover the twentieth-century revival of virtue ethics, or new natural law ethics, or contemporary continental ethics (e.g. Levinas and Habermas), since these are the topics of other graduate courses. Rather, it focuses on the ‘mainstream’ positions in twentieth-century Anglo-American moral philosophy. This course does not assume much background other than a passing familiarity with the history of modern philosophy. We will briefly review the central tenets of Kant’s and Mill’s work as an introduction to our themes, and then concentrate on key primary readings in twentieth-century ethics,with the help of some secondary articles that helpexplain these worksand them in context. The course then has three main units: a)the British intuitionists and emotivism; b) mid-century utilitarianism; and c) the neo-Kantian revival of 1960-2000. We conclude with Shelly Kagan mixed theoretical approach to the problems of supererogation and exceptionless precepts in ethics.  

PHIL 6168: Moral Phenomenology
An exploration of ethical theory in the phenomenological tradition. 

PHIL 7107: Kant's Moral Philosophy, or Kant II
The class will examine Kant's moral philosophy, partly in relationship to Kant's overall philosophical enterprise, and partly in relationship to concerns in contemporary moral philosophy. Throughout an attempt will be made to distill what is valuable in Kant's approach to moral philosophy from what is not. The main primary texts for the course are: Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals, Critique of Practical Reason, and The Metaphysics of Morals. We will make useof the Cambridge UP text, Practical Philosophy (editor, Mary Gregor), which contain all of these.However, we will begin by looking at portions of the first critique and we will periodically refer to other works such as the Religion, the third critique, and the pre-critical Lectures on Ethics, and some of the shorter works.

PHIL 7671: Contemporary Virtue Ethics
The course will examine recent work in virtue ethics. Here is some background: in analytic philosophy, virtue ethics emerged in the1950s and 1960s — especially in the work of Philippa Foot, Peter Geach, and G. E. M. Anscombe — as an alternative to dominant trends in meta-ethics (non-cognitivism and forms of cognitism  such as institutionism) and normative ethics (deontological or Kantian theories as well as consequentialist approaches such as utilitarianism). Virtue ethicists drew upon Aristotle (and to some extent Aquinas) in an attempt to develop a richer moral theory, naturalistic in its meta-ethics and emphasizing the importance of character,and hence the virtues, in its normative ethics. A second impetus for the current revival of virtue ethics was Alasdair MacIntyre’s After Virtue in 1981. This inspired a flood of work in virtue ethics so that by the 1990s it was generally acknowledged that virtue ethics was one of the major alternatives in moral theory, especially in normative ethics and to a lesser extent in meta-ethics.

Sociology and Anthropology
SOCI 5806: Religion and Globalization
This course begins with an overview of the core theoretical debates within the sociology of religion, and then considers them in light of globalization. Issues under consideration include the global expansion of a free-market economic system, the institutionalization of international developmentregime, transnational migration, international institutions, human rights, war, and the global response to HIV/AIDS. The primary course objectives are to understand the implications of these processes for religion and for theory and research on such issues as secularization, religious competition, and religious conflict.

SOCI 6100: Classical Social Theory
This is a course about the social and historical processes that gave rise to “modernity.” Its texts — written from the mid-1800s to the period between the world wars — are the classic statements on the modern world written by Karl Marx, Alexis de Tocqueville, Ferdinand Tönnies, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmel. According to these writers, the process of the formation of modern societies includes four major processes — the economic, the political, the social, and the cultural — and can be traced to developments that followed the decline of feudalism in Western Europe. Each of them contributed theories about one or more of these processes, but we identify Marx as the preeminent thinker about the “economy” as a distinct sphereof social life, just as we identify Weber and Simmel with a cultural sociology that emphasizes religion as a force for profound change in the early modern era. Tocqueville, a writer onthe historical origins ofthe French Revolution, is the author of the first work on the “democratic revolution” of the nineteenth century. Throughout the course, we will return to the examination of how each of the processes were used by these writers to trace the emergence of modern societies and how these processes contributed to the distinct character of the modern world.

SOCI 6553: Demography, Human Rights, and Ethics
The course examines human rights and ethical issues as they arise in the field of population studies. Within this broad area, emphasis will be given to population policies and programs related to abortion, Eugenics, euthanasia, fertility regulation, the use of population data systems to target individuals and vulnerable population subgroups for human rights abuses, the impact of national laws or policies prohibiting data collection and analysis related to specific topics or population subgroups, and the role of demographic analysis in documenting and studying genocide, discriminatory educational programs, or inequities in the criminal justice system. Many of these issues involve complex interactions among causes and impacts. The goal of the course is not to resolve the various issues examined, but to help us all think with greater clarity about these and related issues, their interconnectedness and their broader implications for demography, human rights, ethics.

Psychology
PSYC 5600: Successful Aging—Theory, Research, and Ethical Considerations
This course is designed to gain a deeper understanding of successful aging and to explore mechanisms contributing to it. Particularly, the course seeks to clarify concepts of successful aging and compares early and more recent theories. It also summarizes empirical research on successful aging, contrasting “optimal, “normal” and “pathological” development in old age with respect to the domains of health, cognition, social networks, and well-being. The course will also address ethical questions related to treatment and end of life issues for patients, family and caregivers, as well as the patients’ capacity to consent. In addition, the course also examines current intervention approaches and aims at developing new intervention elements suited for application in multicultural programs to enable more individuals to age successfully.

PSYC 6001: Ethics in Medical and Behavioral Research and Practice
This course examines ethical issues in medical and mental health practice and research. Through readings and case examples the influenceof moral, sociopolitical, cultural, and religious values on ethicaldecision making will be explored within a relational framework emphasizing respect and partnership between patients and professionals.

PSYC 6005: Ethics in Psychology
This course provides general and specific guidance for ethical conduct in the science and practice of psychology. Using case examples and bioethics readings from other disciplines, the course covers the clinical practice of psychology, research, teaching, supervision of trainees, development of assessment instruments, conducting assessments, school psychology, educational counseling, organizational consulting, forensic activities, social intervention, administration, and other activities. Also explored is the history and current role of the federal government, state licensure boards, and the American Psychological Association and other organizations in establishing guidelines and professional codes of ethics for research, teaching, and practice in psychology. The course helps students apply these codes and regulations to traditional areas of psychology and to emerging areas such as telecommunications and managed care.

PSYC 6020: Health Psychology
An introduction to the study of psychological factors in health and illness, which examines the major models, research methods, interventions, and issues in health psychology/behavioral medicine. Topics include stress-illness, compliance, psychoimmunology, social support, and coping in disorders such as cardiovascular disease, pain, cancer, gastrointestinal disorders, diabetes, and obesity.

PSYC 6350: Applied Developmental Psychology
This course will provide an introduction to the roles and activities of professionals in applied developmental psychology. Topics will include definitions of the field, ethical issues, public policy, research design, and program evaluation.

PSYC 6360: Social Policy & Applied Psychology
This course will cover the implications of social policy for applied psychology. Examples include the impact of funding patterns on opportunities for research and the application of psychological interventions, and the implications of health legislation for psychologists' research priorities. The course will also emphasize the social policy implications of psychological knowledge. For example, how data on well-being of the eldery should impact regulation of nursing homes.

PSYC 6290 Health Disparities and Social Inequalities, also cross-listed as CEED 6290
This course focuses on the psychosocial correlates and consequences of health disparities involving individuals and groups that have been historically marginalized by society and in some cases by the health sciences and professions. Readings and class discussions will examine the relationship of contextual factors such as poverty, racial/ethnic discrimination, environmental hazards, incarceration, institutionalization and public policy to social and health inequities faced by children and adults with HIV/AIDS, mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and substance abuse disorders. The role of psychology in the emerging health and human rights paradigm in the United States and globally will also be explored.

PSYC 7020: Psychology and Criminal Law; also listed as HEGL 0369
The role of psychologists in non-criminal forensic matters is both diverse and important. This course covers a number of the areas in which psychologists consult on forensic matters outside of the criminal arena. The semester will be divided relatively evenly between the reviewing case law and legal standards and issues related to clinical practice. Specific legal issues discussed include the concept of torts and malpractice, causation, best interest standards, and standards of proof. We then focus on several of the areas of civil law in which psychologists play a significant role, including personal injury, sexual harassment, disability law, and psychological autopsies. The second area of focus concerns issues that arise in the elderly and medically ill such as informed consent, decision-making competence, physician-assisted suicide, and testamentary capacity. Issues such as psychological testing, report preparation, and expert testimony are discussed inthe context of these issues.

Theology

THEO 6734  The Beauty of Justice
This course explores potential intersections between theories of "the beautiful" and "the good" in both classic and contemporary Christian theology and ethics. It also examines practical examples of this intersection in the lived practices of the Christian community in order to evaluate the viability of a faith that seeks beauty for addressing a variety of social justice problems including environmental racism, urban poverty, conflict resolution, and global health. 

THEO 6720: Fundamental Moral Theology

Secular, Protestant, and Catholic approaches to normative ethics, including discussions of grace and sin, the fundamental option, the Magisterium, and morality.


THEO 6736: Christian Feminist Ethics

This course will examine women's historical and ongoing contributions to the central sources, components and issues of Christian ethics. These include the use of scripture and human experience in ethical reflection, anthropology, moral reasoning and development, sexuality, economic development and the common good.  We will explore these components by evaluating feminist responses to several flash points of ethical debate in our contemporary reality: marriage and the family, bioethics, war and peacemaking, human rights, faith and public life, poverty, AIDS, and environmental justice. The wide range of scholars from various contexts and backgrounds within the Christian tradition that we will explore (Andolson, Cahill, Cannon, Farley, Firer Hinze, Fulkerson, Fritz Cates, Harrison, Isasi-Diaz, Lebacqz,Porter, Ross, Schussler, Fiorenz, Welch, West) underscores the inherent limitations of simplistic labels such as "feminist ethics" and points to the ways in which those once on the margins of Christian ethics have located its center. 

THEO 7735: Biomedical Ethics
This course offers an in-depth examination of the theological presuppositions for the important discussions inbio-medical research, including such things as reproductive technologies, euthanasia, access tohealthcare, abortion and genetic counseling, among others.

 
 Humanities and Sciences  
HUMA 5500 — Responsibility in Action
This coursebuilds on HUGA 5001 but moves in the direction of intelligent and ethical praxis. The focus of the course will stress actual deliberation on the part of the students who will be asked to evaluate conflicting decisions for their relative adequacy and to articulate reasons for their judgments. The theme will vary.

Biological Sciences
BISC 7532 Conservation Law and Policy
This course provides an introduction to the practice of both law and policy analysis, with a focus on issues associated with the conservation of biodiversity. The course is divided into two parts. Part I focuses on law, and students will learn the basics of legal research, legal reasoning, and legal analysis. Part II focuses on policy analysis, and students will learn the basics of the policy process and basis policy analysis. After closely examining the historical context of conservation law and policy in the U.S, this course will examine a wide range of laws, policies, regulations, treaties, and institutions designed to address local, national, and global conservation problems. Topics to be covered include protection of biodiversity, regulatory approaches to pollution, natural resource management, and international conservation law.
In addition to substantial background readings, students will submit two research papers: an analysis of a conservation-related law and a policy analysis of a conservation issue. Students will select their own law and conservation issue in consultation with the instructor.

 Law School 


HEGL 0232: Introduction to Health Law

Introduction to Health Law provides a basic foundation for legal practice in the fieldsof individual health care law and public health law in the United States. In so doing, it explores the relationship between law and policy andthe legal issues that often arise in the state's attempts to regulate personal behavior and the provision of medical care. The course is divided into two sections, the first of which explores the central tension between the state's regulatory powers and individual rights in the context of protecting the public's health. This section of the course covers: federal, state and local public health powers; the circumstances under which the state can limit the freedoms of individuals in order to protect citizens from the consequences of their personal lifestyle choices; compulsory screening; immunization; quarantine and civil commitment; criminal punishment; and mandated treatment. We will also consider legal issues surrounding public health responses to threats of bioterrorism. The second half of the course surveys important legal issues in individual health law, including: accessto health care, public and private health insurance coverage, the obligation to provide care, managed care and regulatory responses, the liability of healthcare institutions and providers, and anti-discrimination law in relation to medical care access.

HSGL 0322: Natural Law: The Nature, Foundations, and Content of Justice
This course will examine the theoretical foundations and practical implications of natural law theory. Because "natural law" is often taken to mean many different things, one of the course's first aims will beto establish a common vocabulary for identifying and distinguishing the various "versions" of natural law theory: e.g., classical-teleological, utilitarian, and deontological-contractarian. We will see that a common denominator in all natural law theory is the proposition that positive law (i.e., law as it is simply "posited" or enacted by lawmakers) does not exhaust the content of the law, and can be evaluated in light of a "higher law" or a "natural law."Our ensuing discussion of the difference between positive law and natural law will open onto a series of questions that will guide us through the rest of the course: "Is there really a natural law?" "If there is a natural law, what is the basis upon which this law exists and becomes knowable to us?" "If natural law exists, then what is its moral content and what does this moral content have to say about individual goods and their relation to the common good?" "Furthermore, how is the moral content of natural law to be enforced ormade effective through our system of positive law?" "Finally, how are we to make sense of the natural law tradition in light of our contemporary understandings of judicial review, governmental neutrality, and reasonable pluralism?" The course will not only introduce the classical natural law tradition (based mainly on the thought of Aristotle and Aquinas), but will place this classical tradition in dialogue with contemporary thinkers (e.g., JohnFinnis, Robert George, Michael Sandel, John Rawls, and Ronald Dworkin). The ultimate aim of the course will be to achieve an understanding ofthe natural law traditionand its relevance for a variety of contemporary legal issues. No prior acquaintance with jurisprudence is assumed; the relevant concepts will be developed in class.

HEGL 0333: Law and End of Life Medical Decisions
The origins of individual autonomy that underlie the right of patients to control clinical decisions will be the starting point. Evolution of this right from control of clinical decisions in general to those concerning life-sustaining treatment will then be considered using Quinlan and the cases that led to and emerged from it as a point of reference. Ramifications of this area of the law will be explored including the legal distinctions between withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatments, the role of surrogate decision makers, withdrawal of nutritional support, "brain death" v. "persistent vegetative state,"and allowance for conscientious objection, State law, both statutory and judicial, will be examined with emphasis on New York State with emphasis on Advanced Directives and thelaws and cases that have defined their legal status. Constitutional issues will also be considered using Cruzan and thecases under-lying it as a focus. Finally, extension of the right to control life-sustaining treatment decisionsto the area of PhysicianAssisted Death will be examined using Quill v. Vacco and Compassion in Dying v. Washingtonand the Oregon "Death with Dignity" act as thebasis. The question raisedin the study of this body of law will serve as a model for the broader range of issues where law, individualand societal values, and religious beliefs intersect.

HEGL 0369: Psychology and Criminal Law; also listed as PSYC 7020
The role of psychologists in non-criminal forensic matters is both diverse andimportant. This course covers a number of the areas in which psychologists consult on forensic matters outsideof the criminal arena. The semester will be divided relatively evenly between the reviewing case law and legal standards and issues related to clinical practice. Specific legal issues discussed include the concept of torts and malpractice, causation, best interest standards, and standards of proof. We then focus on several of the areas of civil law in which psychologists play a significant role, including personal injury, sexual harassment, disability law, and psychological autopsies. The second area of focus concerns issues that arise in the elderly and medically ill such as informed consent, decision-making competence, physician-assisted suicide, and testamentary capacity. Issues such as psychological testing, reportpreparation, and expert testimony are discussed inthe context of these issues.

HEGL 0371: Health Care Law Advances
This course examines therecent changes, developments and legal ramifications of health care law. Topics include restructuring of health care deliveryand antitrust implications; the changing standard of patient physician confidentiality; the conflict between the physician as a healer and a business person; medical malpractice and the physician expert witness; FDA approval of drugs and medical devices; the rationing of medical care, and physician assistedsuicide.

JUGL 0347: Jewish Law
The course will analyze the Jewish legal system, focusing on topics that are relevant tocontemporary American legal scholarship and jurisprudence. In addition to a general discussion of the history and development of Jewish law, the course will address the substantive and procedural aspects of the law. Among the substantive areas to be covered are capital punishment, abortion, euthanasia, marriage and divorce, contracts, torts and property law. Finally, the course will examine the application of Jewish law in modern society, both in the United States, through the Free Exercise Clause and the Establishment Clause, and in the legal system of the State of Israel.

HEGL 0521: Bioethics Law
This course will review ethical and legal problems raised by developments in medicine and the biological sciences, technologies, fetal treatment and research, experimentation with human subjects, and societal controls on scientific advances. Among the topics that will be investigated are: 1) Anatomy and Bodily Integrity, 2) Privacy of the Individual and Information, 3) Life in its Different Forms: Stem Cells to Organ Transplantation, 4) Law and Ethics of Human Subject Research, 5) Conflicts of Interest, Profits and Commerce, 7) Ethics of Health Care Access, 8) Ethics of the Individual vs. Ethics of Society, 9) Ethics of Elder Care: Capacity and Competency, 10) and Bioethics at the End of Life. Selected readings will be assigned, and will be reviewed in class. Active participation in class discussion is expected. This is a paper course that can be taken to fulfill the writing requirement. This intensive three-day graduate level course is designed to provide cross-disciplinary perspectives on moral theory and applied ethics. Using a team-teaching approach, this course brings together faculty from at least six different disciplines to provide foundational knowledge about moral theory with contemporary applications. In addition to seminars on foundations in moral philosophy, moral theology, and moral psychology, the course features lectures and case discussions on issues of current social importance. This year, we focused on the following topics: decisions at the end of life, economic social justice, and responsibility in conducting research with vulnerable populations. Course requirements include a mastery of the reading materials, active participation, and topic-oriented thought papers during the three-day workshop. In addition, successful completion of the course requires a post-workshop paper summarizing the integration of course material into the students' graduate work.

Graduate School of Social Service 
SWGS 7202: Principles of Medical Ethics and their Application to Contemporary Health Care Issues
The course will be directed at the practical application of the Principles of Health Care Ethics to contemporary issues in health care planning, management, and delivery. Particularly in an era of increasing regulatory mandates and decreasing availability of both human and institutional resources, an understanding of the function of ethical analysis is of critical importance in the identification, elucidation, and resolution of health care controversies. To that end, the course will include an overview of the philosophical foundations of the principles of medical ethics and present a methodology for their employment in the attempted resolution of the myriad of issues which obtain at the confluence of health care delivery and morals. Of particular importance will be consideration of the issues of patient and professional autonomy, beneficence and non-maleficence, confidentiality, informed consent, and distributive justice.Application to contemporary concerns will include attention to the questions of euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and AIDS. The course will be conducted as a seminar centered on the analysis of case studies.

 
CENTER for Ethics Education
CEED 5050: Ethics & Society—Cross-Disciplinary Perspectives
This introductory course will present methods of ethical inquiry from two different disciplines and will demonstrate how these disciplines interactively and independently apply these methods to issues of contemporary social import. Relevant moral and ethical frameworks will be introduced, along with background on issues of current social importance. Class readings will include writings relevant to social ethical issues from multiple perspectives, including anthropology, economics, philosophy, political science, psychology, religious studies, sociology, and theology. The intent of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the knowledge and critical thinking skills that will enable them to identify and understanding the ethical decisions that affect the welfare of individuals and society and the integrity of their professions.

CEED 6000: Capstone Course for Certificate in Health Care Ethics
The course will be conducted as a two-hour weekly seminar, team-taught by the multidisciplinary core faculty for the Certificate in Health Care Ethics. Course activities will also intersect with the Center's Lecture Series to be held each spring. Each year, three to five national and international leading scholars in the area of Health Care Ethics will serve as Fellows of the Center forEthics Education. During the spring semester, each Fellowwill visitthe campus for one to two days, during which theFellow would deliver a university-wide lecture, lead a class discussion for capstone students, and meet and consult with interested faculty and students. The final details of the course will be determined by the Advisory Board of the Ethics Center, but it is anticipated that the students in the capstone course willattend these lectures and symposia with the Fellows and prepare a research proposal, policy statement, or other integrative paper as requirements of the course.
Only students who complete the first three (3) courses would be allowed to take a capstone seminar. Class readings willinclude writings relevant to health care ethics from multiple perspectives,including anthropology, economics, philosophy, medicine, political science, psychology, religious studies, sociology, and theology. The topics and readings will vary each year based on current ethical issues in health care, visiting Fellows of the Center, and participating Fordham faculty. Though the topic may vary, the influence of moral, socio-political,cultural, and religious values on ethical decision making will be explored withina relational framework, emphasizing respect and partnership among practitioners and patients as well as among scientists and research participants. The intent of each course is to provide students with knowledge andcritical thinking skills that can enhance their understanding of and participation in ethical decisions that affect the welfare of individuals and society and theintegrity of their professions. 

CEED 6100: Theories and Applications in Contemporary Ethics
This intensive three-day graduate level course is designed to provide cross-disciplinary perspectives on moral theory and applied ethics. Using a team-teaching approach, this course brings together faculty from at least six different disciplines to provide foundational knowledge about moral theory with contemporary applications. In addition to seminars on foundations in moral philosophy, moral theology, and moral psychology, the course features lectures and case discussions on issues of current social importance. This year, we focused on the following topics: decisions at the end of life, economic social justice, and responsibility in conducting research with vulnerable populations. Course requirements include a mastery of the reading materials, active participation, and topic-oriented thought papers during the three-day workshop. In addition, successful completion of the course requires a post-workshop paper summarizing the integration of course material into the students' graduate work.

CEED 6290 Health Disparities and Social Inequalities, also cross-listed as PSYC 6290
This course focuses on the psychosocial correlates and consequences of health disparities involving individuals and groups that have been historically marginalized by society and in some cases by the health sciences and professions. Readings and class discussions will examine the relationship of contextual factors such as poverty, racial/ethnic discrimination, environmental hazards, incarceration, institutionalization and public policy to social and health inequities faced by children and adults with HIV/AIDS, mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and substance abuse disorders. The role of psychology in the emerging health and human rights paradigm in the United States and globally will also be explored.


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