Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 



CLUE Publications and Conference Proceedings


Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., and Whitten, S. E. Guided cognition of unsupervised learning: A new approach to designing homework. In preparation, 2010.

Whitten, W. B., II.  Learning from and for tests.  In Successful Remembering and Successful Forgetting: A Festschrift in honor of Robert A. Bjork. In Press, 2010.

Whitten, W. B., II, and Rabinowitz, M.  Performance gains from guided cognition mathematics homework persist for months.  Presented at the Institute of Education Sciences 2010 Research Conference, Washington, DC, June 29, 2010. VIEW PDF

Whitten, W. B., II, and Rabinowitz, M.  Designing better homework: guided cognition and content representation. In the symposium: Solving problems in school: concepts, procedures, and instruction to support learning.  Presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA, May 30, 2010.

Whitten, W. B., II, and Rabinowitz, M.  Is guided cognition mathematics homework a more effective "advance organizer" or "consolidator?"  Presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA, May 29, 2010.  VIEW PDF

Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., Whitten, S. E.  Designing more effective homework for mathematics learning.  Presented at the Third Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Education Research, Fordham University, New York, NY, April 24, 2010.

Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., Whitten, S. E. Guided cognition homework improves mathematics interpretations and calculations.  Presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Boston, MA, November 22, 2009.

Whitten, W. B., II, Whitten, S. E. and Rabinowitz, M., Guided cognition of unsupervised study increases learning for students from ages 12 to 18. Presented at the 13th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, Amsterdam, Netherlands, August 26, 2009.

Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., and Whitten, S. E. Guided cognition for unsupervised learning of mathematics improves subsequent calculation performance. Presented at the Institute of Education Sciences 2009 Research Conference, Washington, DC, June 9, 2009.
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Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., and Whitten, S. E. Opinions of guided cognition homework vary with age, ability, and experience. Presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, San Francisco, CA, May 23, 2009.
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Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., Whitten, S. E., and Portnoy, L. B. Guided cognition in homework: Effectiveness of specific cognitive events for average and advanced ability students. Presented at the Second Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Education Research, Fordham University, New York, NY, February 27, 2009.

Whitten, W. B., II. Learning from and for tests. Invited presentation at Successful Remembering and Successful Forgetting: A Festschrift in honor of Robert A. Bjork, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, January 11, 2009.

Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., Whitten, S. E., and Portnoy, L. B. Guided cognition of unsupervised learning: Designing effective homework, Part 3. Presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Chicago, IL, November 14, 2008.

Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., Whitten, S. E., and Portnoy, L. B. Guided cognition in homework: Effectiveness and design of individual cognitive events. Presented at the Institute of Education Sciences 2008 Research Conference, Washington, DC, June 12, 2008.

Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., Whitten, S. E., and Portnoy, L. B. Preference for guided cognition homework increases with ability level. Presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Chicago, IL, May 24, 2008.
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Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., Whitten, S. E., and Portnoy, L. B. Guiding cognition for effective unsupervised learning. Presented at the First Annual Subway Summit on Cognition and Education Research, Fordham University, New York, NY, April 4, 2008.

Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., and Whitten, S. E. Guided cognition of unsupervised learning: Designing effective homework, Part 2. Presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Long Beach, CA, November 18, 2007.

Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., and Whitten, S. E. Are guided cognition learning advantages the result of novelty? Presented at the 12th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction, Budapest, Hungary, September 1, 2007.

Whitten, W. B., II and Rabinowitz, M. The learning advantage from guided cognition homework persists and influences future thinking. Presented at the Institute of Education Sciences 2007 Research Conference, Washington, DC, June 7, 2007.
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Rabinowitz M., Whitten, W. B., II, and Whitten, S. E. Guided cognition experience influences subsequent thinking. Presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Washington, DC, May 27, 2007.

Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz, M., and Whitten, S. E. Guided cognition of unsupervised learning: Designing effective homework. Presented at the annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Houston, TX, November 18, 2006.

Whitten, W. B., II and Rabinowitz, M. Guided cognition of unsupervised learning: A new approach to designing homework. Presented at the Institute of Education Sciences 2006 Research Conference, Washington, DC, June 16, 2006.
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Whitten, W. B., II, Rabinowitz M., and Whitten, S. E. Enhancing unsupervised learning through guided cognition. Presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, New York, NY, May 26, 2006.

Garay, G., Rabinowitz, M., and Whitten, W. B., II. Guided cognition of computational skill. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, CA, April, 2006.

Whitten, W. B., II, Whitten, S. E., and Rabinowitz, M. Guided cognition of unsupervised learning. Presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association, San Francisco, CA, April, 2006.
                         

The research reported here was supported by the Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education, through grants R305H050062 (2005 - 2008) and R305A080134 (2008 - 2011) to Fordham University. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not represent views ofthe Institute orthe U.S. Department of Education.

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