Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


Manresa Courses, Fall 2014

FCRH Student Course Choices


The Manresa course will be one of five courses each FCRH student takes in the fall semester.
It fulfills the FCRH
Eloquentia Perfecta 1 Core Requirement.

Abnormal Psychology in Contemporary Culture
(satisfies social science core)
Professor Peggy Andover

Students learn about the prevalence, course, causes, and treatments of psychiatric disorders. In addition, this course investigates the accuracy of representations of mental illness in books, movies, and art, including how these representations inform our understanding of and attitudes toward mental illness.


Texts and Contexts: Spanish Colonialism Through Film
(satisfies Texts & Contexts core)
Professor Sara Lehman

Study of foreign and U.S. cinematographic representations of Spanish imperialism and conquest, accompanied by readings of pertinent fragments of Colonial chronicles in translation. Films may include modern, silent, and operatic genres.


Discrete Structures, Computer Science and Transformative Technologies
(satisfies mathematical reasoning core)
Professor Christine Papadakis-Kanaris

This course surveys basic materials in discrete structure and algorithms used in computing science, information technology, and telecommunications. Topics include: sets, permutation/combinations, functions/relations/graphs, sum/limit/partition, logic and induction, recursion/recurrence relation, systems of equations and matrices, and database structure and analysis. Practical examples of applications and programming are demonstrated.


The Lost Interlocutor: Philosophy of Human Nature
(satisfies Philosophy of Human Nature core)
Professor Robert Parmach

Proceeding by the Socratic Method, this course examines the views of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Descartes, and their intellectual links to contemporary science, religion, and Jesuit education. We investigate salient themes, including existence, knowledge, truth, mind, justice, morality, reality, belief, and love. The course stresses critical spoken dialogue and writing intensive assignments, many of which consist of interactive (and fun) out-of-class learning experiences. The professor even feeds you at most of these.


Understanding Historical Change: Representing China & The West
(satisfies Globalism and Understanding Historical Change core)
Professor Grace Shen

This course explores the evolving pattern of representations of China by Anglo-Europeans and representations of "the West" by Chinese, and uses these sources to broader questions about how people understand others and how these understandings reflect and shape history. We analyze the basic categories by which we understand peoples and places as constructed categories that reflect issues of access, translation, and our own shifting cultural and political concerns. We will come to see historical change as a combination of changes in the pattern of events and changes in how we identify those things within our own limited frames of reference.


Restless Hearts: The Search for God
(satisfies Faith and Critical Reason core)
Professor Thomas Scirghi, S.J.

Many writers throughout history have described their personal quest for the transcendent. Writers—both classical and popular, believers and atheists, some reverent, some vulgar—describe this quest as a matter of first losing and then finding oneself. This seminar explores the search of these writers through their autobiographies.


Jesuit Cross-Cultural Encounters
(satisfies Texts & Contexts core)
Professor Julie Kim

This course examines Jesuit writings about their North American experiences. Many Europeans visited the Americas during the age of exploration, but the Jesuits were unique because their mission of conversion required them to live alongside native peoples and immerse themselves in their daily lives. As they learned about the peoples of North America, so did Native Americans learn about them. Over the course of the semester, we will think about how Jesuits and Native Americans related to each other across cultures or participated in what is often called cross-cultural encounter.



GSB Student Course Choices


The Manresa course will be one of five courses each GSB student takes in the fall semester.

The Ground Floor
(satisfies GSB core requirement)
Professor Janet DiLorenzo

This introduction to business course challenges students to learn about the environment within which business operates and the various disciplines and key concepts involved. Students are encouraged to study and appreciate how such ingredients are integrated to produce an overall effective organization, as well as become aware of political, social, and environmental forces that change business practices, perceptions, and evolving career tracks.


The Lost Interlocutor: Philosophy of Human Nature
(satisfies Philosophy of Human Nature GSB core requirement)
Professor Robert Parmach

Proceeding by the Socratic Method, this course examines the views of Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, and Descartes, and their intellectual links to contemporary science, religion, and Jesuit education. We investigate salient themes, including existence, knowledge, truth, mind, justice, morality, reality, belief, and love. The course stresses critical spoken dialogue and writing intensive assignments, many of which consist of interactive (and fun) out-of-class learning experiences. The professor even feeds you at most of these.


Restless Hearts: The Search for God
(satisfies Faith and Critical Reason GSB core requirement)
Professor Thomas Scirghi, S.J.

Many writers throughout history have described their personal quest for the transcendent. Writers—both classical and popular, believers and atheists, some reverent, some vulgar—describe this quest as a matter of first losing and then finding oneself. This seminar explores the search of these writers through their autobiographies.


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