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Course Descriptions










Master of Arts in Ethics and Society

Course Descriptions
(where available)



Fall 2013 Course Offerings



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES


BISC 7532
  Conservation Law and Policy
This course provides an introduction to the practice of both law and policy analysis, with a focus on issues associated with the conservation of biodiversity. The course is divided into two parts. Part I focuses on law, and students will learn the basics of legal research, legal reasoning, and legal analysis. Part II focuses on policy analysis, and students will learn the basics of the policy process and basis policy analysis. After closely examining the historical context of conservation law and policy in the U.S, this course will examine a wide range of laws, policies, regulations, treaties, and institutions designed to address local, national, and global conservation problems. Topics to be covered include protection of biodiversity, regulatory approaches to pollution, natural resource management, and international conservation law. In addition to substantial background readings, students will submit two research papers: an analysis of a conservation-related law and a policy analysis of a conservation issue. Students will select their own law and conservation issue in consultation with the instructor.

CENTER FOR ETHICS EDUCATION

CEED 5050 Ethics and Society: Cross Disciplinary Perspectives
This is the introductory course for the Master's in Ethics and Society. The course will present methods of ethical inquiry from multiple areas of inquiry and will demonstrate how these disciplines interactively and independently apply these methods to issues of contemporary social import. Relevant moral and ethical frameworks will be introduced, along with background on issues of current social importance. The course will provide an introduction to the key frameworks of the degree: moral philosophy, moral theology, and professional ethics in the social and natural sciences. In addition, class readings will include writings relevant to social ethical issues from multiple perspectives, including anthropology, business, economics, philosophy, psychology, theology and religious studies, law, and sociology. The intent of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the knowledge and critical thinking skills that will enable them to identify and understanding the ethical decisions that affect the welfare of individuals and the integrity of their professions.

CEED 5900 Ethics and Society: Field Practicum Experience
The goal of the practicum is to provide an opportunity for advanced students in Fordham's Master of Arts in Ethics and Society to spend one day per week during a semester "shadowing" professionals who are engaged in services that require ethical decision-making. Students selected for the practicum will first be required to complete relevant Ethics and Society coursework and/or possess relevant experience. Throughout the semester, students will meet collectively on a weekly basis to discuss their experience and plan their projects.

CEED 6100  Ethics and Society: Theories and Applications in Contemporary Ethics
This intensive three-day graduate level course is designed to provide cross-disciplinary perspectives on moral theory and applied ethics. Using a team-teaching approach, this course brings together faculty from at least six different disciplines to provide foundational knowledge about moral theory with contemporary applications. In addition to seminars on foundations in moral philosophy, moral theology, and other fields, the course features lectures and case discussions on issues of current social importance.
 
CEED 6290   Health Disparities and Social Inequalities  (Cross Listed as PSYC 6290)
This course focuses on the psychosocial correlates and consequences of health disparities involving individuals and groups that have been historically marginalized by society and in some cases by the health sciences and professions. Readings and class discussions will examine the relationship of contextual factors such as poverty, racial/ethnic discrimination, environmental hazards, incarceration, institutionalization and public policy to social and health inequities faced by children and adults with HIV/AIDS, mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and substance abuse disorders. The role of psychology in the emerging health and human rights paradigm in the United States and globally will also be explored. 

CEED 6322  Natural Law: The Nature, Foundations, and Content of Justice  (cross Listed as HSGL 0322)
This course will examine the theoretical foundations and practical implications of natural law theory. Because “natural law theory” is often taken to mean many different things, one of the course’s first aims will be to establish a common vocabulary for identifying and distinguishing the various kinds of natural law theory (e.g., “natural law theory” as a kind of moral theory, as a kind of legal theory, and as a kind of theory about human rights).  Our ensuing discussion will open onto a series of questions that will guide us through the rest of the course: “What is the nature of justice?”  “What are the different kinds of justice and what does it mean to have a right?” “What do rights and justice have to do with one another?”  “What is the nature of law?” “What is the difference between positive law and natural law?”  “Is law reducible to the will of the strongest, or is it the case – as the natural law tradition holds – that unjust law is no law at all?”  “What is meant by ‘the good’ and ‘the common good’?”  “What is the nature, scope, and justification of authority (both legal authority and other kinds of authority)?”  “What is the nature and purpose of punishment?”  “And how are we to make sense of the natural law tradition in light of our contemporaryunderstandings of autonomy, governmental neutrality, and reasonable pluralism?” The course will not only introduce the classical natural law tradition (based mainly on the thought of Aristotle and Aquinas), but will place this classical tradition in dialogue with contemporary thinkers. The ultimate aim of the course will be to achieve an understanding of the natural law tradition and its relevance for a variety of contemporary legal issues. No prior acquaintance with philosophy or jurisprudence is assumed; the relevant concepts will be developed in class.

COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES

COMM 6851
  Communication Ethics
Examination of media practices from the perspectives of owners, producers and publics, with particular focus on intellectual property, privacy, confidentiality, conflict of interest, censorship, corporate responsibility and new technologies. Students willdiscuss philosophical approaches to ethics and public life, place these approaches in historical context, and engage in informed media criticism.

ECONOMICS

ECON 5415 Gender and Economic Development
  

This course draws on material from economics and other social sciences to analyze the social and economic nature of gender and economic development in a cross-cultural perspective. The class will be run as a discussion-based seminar

ECON 5808 Migration, Microfinance and Poverty
Migration, access to credit (microfinance) and remittances can create employment and education opportunities for poor families, particularly women. Interdisciplinary case studies from Mexico, the Dominican Republic, the Bronx, Amsterdam, Nigeria, China, Bangladesh and India show how race, class and gender affect employment outcomes.

LATINO AND LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

LALS 5007  Working with Survivors of Violence
The need to bridge academic knowledge with applied programs when working with survivors of violence enhances the basic need of solidarity with other human beings, victimized by natural and political disasters and their consequences, and encourages us to learn more about their experiences, as we attempt to try to find better ways of living together. There is a general assumption underlying the discussion of topics that action is necessary, and we will be reviewing different types of program as implemented by different local and international organizations in different Latin American countries. This course will consider both theoretical andapplied approaches, and will be centered on ways of thinking and actions that bridge these two responses. Lastly, it will give the students the opportunity of becoming more familiar with the work inside the Latino communities within the USA, and with the work overseas within communities in Colombia, Guatemala, Peru, and Bolivia.

LAW

HSGL 0322  Natural Law: The Nature, Foundations, and Content of Justice
This course will examine the theoretical foundations and practical implications of natural law theory. Because “natural law theory” is often taken to mean many different things, one of the course’s first aims will be to establish a common vocabulary for identifying and distinguishing the various kinds of natural law theory (e.g., “natural law theory” as a kind of moral theory, as a kind of legal theory, and as a kind of theory about human rights).  Our ensuing discussion will open onto a series of questions that will guide us through the rest of the course: “What is the nature of justice?”  “What are the different kinds of justice and what does it mean to have a right?” “What do rights and justice have to do with one another?”  “What is the nature of law?” “What is the difference between positive law and natural law?”  “Is law reducible to the will of the strongest, or is it the case – as the natural law tradition holds – that unjust law is no law at all?”  “What is meant by ‘the good’ and ‘the common good’?”  “What is the nature, scope, and justification of authority (both legal authority and other kinds of authority)?”  “What is the nature and purpose of punishment?”  “And how are we to make sense of the natural law tradition in light of our contemporary understandings of autonomy, governmental neutrality, and reasonablepluralism?” The course will not only introduce the classical natural law tradition (based mainly on the thought of Aristotle and Aquinas), but will place this classical tradition in dialogue with contemporary thinkers. The ultimate aim of the course will be to achieve an understanding of the natural law tradition and its relevance for a variety of contemporary legal issues. No prior acquaintance with philosophy or jurisprudence is assumed; the relevant concepts will be developed in class.

The first part of this seminar is a survey of several major theories and approaches to jurisprudence in the 20th century, theories such as those of H.L.A. Hart, Lon Fuller, John Rawls, and Ronald Dworkin, plus other related topics. We will then turn to some contemporary issues that bear on jurisprudence in a broader sense: Dworkin's recent attempt to resolve conflicts over human rights and terrorism, religion and the state, and redistributive justice, based on principles of human dignity; and Cass Sunstein's warnings about the dangers of "radical judges" and the legal theories they and other judges follow, comparing and contrasting Fundamentalism (originalism), Perfectionism, Minimalism, and Majoritarianism as competing models for court decisions. Other short readings may be assigned.

HEGL 0369
  Psychology and Criminal Law, also cross-listed in psychology as PSGA 7020
The role of psychologists and other mental health professionals in civil litigation is both diverse and important. This course covers a number of the areas in which psychologists consult on matters related to civil practice law forensic matters outside of the criminal arena. This course brings psychology graduate students and law students together in a broad overview of issues related to mental health law and civil practice. The semester will be divided relatively evenly between reviewing the case law and legal standards and the clinical issues that bear upon these legal issues. Through this course, law students will gain expertise understanding, utilizing, and responding to mental health testimony in civil litigation and psychology students will develop skills evaluating mental health issues that arise in these contexts. Specific legal issues discussed include the concept of torts and malpractice, causation, standards of proof, and expert testimony. We will focus on several of the areas of civil law in which psychologists play a significant role, including personal injury, sexual harassment, and disability law, as well as a number of issues that arise in elderly or medically ill individuals such as informed consent and decision-making competence, involuntary treatment and the right to refuse medications, physician-assisted suicide, testamentary capacity, and psychological autopsies. Issues such as psychological testing, report preparation and expert testimony are discussed in the context of these issues and the legal standards that apply.

Catholic Social Thought & Economic Justice
This seminar focuses on the response of the Roman Catholic Church to the economic order as it has evolved over the past century, and explores its potential implications for various areas of legal practice and policy.

EVGL 0521  Environmental Justice: Theory and Practice
This course will introduce students to the concept of environmental justice and lead them through an exploration of the history of racism and the environment in America, resource colonization and the destruction of indigenous cultures, and the specter of environmental insecurity.

EHGL 0299-001: Professional Responsibility - Lawyers and Justice
This course uses the specific ethical dilemmas confronting public interest and civil government lawyers as the primary resource for investigating the legal ethics rules, the role of lawyer in society, and the connections between legal ethics and political philosophy. The students and teacher work collaboratively on developing the specific curriculum for the semester.

ITGL 0445 Human Rights, Holocaust, and the Law 
This course will examine issues relating to the assault on human rights in the modern world, focusing primarily on genocidal practices by nations in the 20th century. The course will include the debate over the definition of human rights, the legal mechanisms for enforcing human rights, and the law of war and the Geneva Conventions. If law is designed to bring order to an otherwise chaotic world, then acts of genocide must represent the ultimate breakdown of those laws, and provide the evidence of just how fragile our claims to civilization actually are. The course will focus on some of the philosophical, political, psychological and legal explanations that have been offered to explain the existence of human rights violations and genocides. The course will also look at the psychological impact that such human rights atrocities have had on victims and survivors. In dealing with some of these issues, the course will focus on the Holocaust and the role that an elaborate and articulated system of German laws played in the de-emancipation and murder of German citizens and foreign nationals. The asserted uniqueness of the Holocaust will be examined in its relationship to prior and subsequent human rights abuses in this century.  

EHGL 0299 Professional Responsibility:  Ethics in Criminal Advocacy 
This course focuses on the ethical responsibilities of prosecutors and criminal defense lawyers. Topics include the allocation of decision-making authority, the duty of confidentiality and its limits, conflicts of interests, and ethical responsibilities in the investigation and trial of criminal cases. While focusing on the codified standards of professional responsibility, the course will also explore the relationship between the Constitution andethical rules as well as how problems left unresolved by those rules ought to be addressed.

JUGL 0393 Catholic Perspectives on Conflict Resolution
This two credit seminar offers an historical and contemporary account of Catholic perspectives on conflict resolution, war and peace. It examines the evolution of the just war theory from St. Augustine until the present time with particular emphasis on papal documents. Other topics for the course include: the role of the Holy See in international relations and in transitional justice regimes Catholic peacemaking and peace building traditions U.S. Catholic approaches to war and peace the doctrine of humanitarian intervention Catholic international mediation efforts and, Catholic non-violence theory.

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 5003  Natural Law Ethics
The tradition of natural law ethics includes a rather wide variety of theories. From its origins natural law thinking has attempted to identify and defend an objective and intelligible basis for morality by concentrating on human nature, especially in terms of its structures and teleology. For some, the natural law refers primarily to a higher law by which to measure the justice of human institutions and civil legislation. Some thinkers have called on natural law in order to defend the natural rights of individuals. Others prefer to use it to understand what makes agents morally virtuous and what the goal of human development is. What unites these many views under a common title is the appeal to nature as in certain ways normative for human behavior. An important aim of this course is to acquaint the student with a variety of theories that fall under the heading of natural law ethics and the different sorts of problems they are designedto address. A second aim is to exemplify the application of the natural law/natural rights tradition to current moral problems. Given the important theological uses made of the natural moral law, a third aim is to explore some connections between philosophical and theological approaches to ethics by considering of certain recent papal encyclicals.
 
PHIL 5301
  Environmental Philosophy and Ethics
An examination of perennial philosophical questions relating to environmental ethics.

PHIL 5114  Normative Ethical Theories
This course is a systematic review of major theories in contemporary normative ethics -- such as virtue ethics in the Aristotelian tradition (and alternatives), utilitarianism, Kantian and intuitionist deontological theories, -- with brief consideration of their historical development. Most of the readings will be from 20th century versions of these approaches and contemporary applications. This is an introductory ethics class for graduate-level studies that provides a sound basis for further research in several applied fields, and it presupposes only minimal background in ethical theory.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POSC 5243 Campaign Finance and Ethics
This course is designed to introduce students to the current campaign finance laws that regulate elections for federal and non-federal political candidates.  Emphasis will be placed on recent changes to the regulations and an examination of the details of the Bipartisan Campaign Finance Reform Act.  Students will also discuss contribution sources and resource allocation in political campaigns, as well as ethics and ethical practices in campaign financing and management.

POGA 5301 Modern Political Thought
This course considers the relationship between religion and politics by readingEuro-American political thinkers such as Spinoza, Leibniz, Kant, Hume, and Locke. We also consider how post-Enlightenment philosophers—such as Michel Foucault, Jürgen Habermas, Tariq Ramadan, and Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na‘im—address the Islamic revival.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 5600 Successful Aging: Concepts and Determinants  This course is designed to gain a deeper understanding of successful aging and to explore mechanisms contributing to it. Particularly, the course seeks to clarify concepts of successful aging and compares early and more recent theories. It also summarizes empirical research on successful aging, contrasting “optimal, “normal” and “pathological” development in old age with respect to the domains of health, cognition, social networks, and well-being. The course will also address ethical questions related to treatment and end of life issues for patients, family and caregivers, as well as the patients’ capacity to consent. In addition, the course also examines current intervention approaches and aims at developing new intervention elements suited for application in multicultural programs to enable moreindividuals to age successfully.

PSYC 6001 Ethics in Medical and Behavioral Research and Practice
This course examines ethical issues in medical and mental health practice and research. Through readings and case examples the influence of moral, sociopolitical, cultural, and religious values on ethical decision making will be explored within a relational framework emphasizing respect and partnership between patients and professionals.

PSYC 6005
 
Ethics in Psychology
This course provides general and specific guidance for ethical conduct in the science and practice of psychology.   Using case examples and bioethics readings from other disciplines, the course covers the clinical practice of psychology, research, teaching, supervision of trainees, development of assessment instruments, conducting assessments, school psychology, educational counseling, organizational consulting, forensic activities, social intervention, administration, andother activities. Also explored is the history and current role of the federal government, state licensure boards, and the American Psychological Association and other organizations in establishing guidelines and professional codes ofethics for research, teaching, and practice in psychology. The course helps students apply these codes and regulations to traditional areas ofpsychology and to emerging areas such as telecommunications and managed care.

PSYC 6290
  Health Disparities and Social Inequalities , also cross-listed as CEED 6290
This course focuses on the psychosocial correlates and consequences of health disparities involving individuals and groups that have been historically marginalized by society and in some cases by the health sciences and professions. Readings and class discussions will examine the relationship of contextual factors such as poverty, racial/ethnic discrimination, environmental hazards, incarceration, institutionalization and public policy to social and health inequities faced by children and adults with HIV/AIDS, mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and substance abuse disorders. The role of psychology in the emerging health and human rights paradigm in the United States and globally will also be explored. 

PSYC 6350 Applied Developmental Psychology
This course will provide anintroduction to the roles and activities of professionals in applied developmental psychology. Topics will include definitions of the field, ethical issues, public policy, research design, and program evaluation.

PSYC 6510
  Social Influences on Behavior
This course critically examines theories and research on a wide array of topics including but not limited to social cognition, moral development, and effects of stereotyping and cultural identification, gender, schooling and workplaces, and TV, video and computers on individual lifespan development. Topics of interest of individual students are incorporated in the class structuring each semester.

PSYC 7010 Pyschology and Criminal Law (3) cross-listed as a law course HEGL 0369. See above for course description.

PSYC 7020 Psychology and Civil Law (3)
This course covers a number of the areas in which psychologists consult on forensic matters outside of the criminal arena.  The semester will be divided relatively evenly between the reviewing case law and legal standards and issues related to clinical practice.  Specific legal issues discussed include the concept of torts and malpractice, causation, best interest standards, andstandards of proof.  The first application of these issues pertains to civil law, including the role of psychologists in personal injury and sexual harassment cases, and disability law.  The second are of focus concerns the role of psychologists in the family court, including a child custody and visitation evaluations, termination of parental rights, and divorce mediation. Finally, we discuss issues that arise in the elderly and medically ill such as informed consent, decision-making competence, physician-assisted suicide, and testamentary capacity.  Overarching issues such as psychological testing, report preparation and expert testimony are discussed in the context of these topics.

SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY

SOCI 5410 Gender and Sexuality
This course provides a comprehensive overview of the theoretical and empirical developments in the field of gender. It will explore how gender is built into the structures, institutions and ideologies of social life, and the interaction between gender and other axes of inequality, including race, class and sexual orientation. The course will examine the experiences of men and women as well as those who do not fit into these gender categories. 

SOCI 5806
  Religion and Globalization
This course beginswith an overview of the core theoretical debates within the sociology of religion, and then considers them in light of globalization. Issues under consideration include the global expansion of a free-market economic system, the institutionalization of international development regime, transnational migration, international institutions, human rights, war, and the global response to HIV/AIDS. The primary course objectives are to understand the implications of these processes for religion and for theory and research on such issues as secularization, religious competition, and religious conflict.

SOCI 6100 Classical Social Theory
This is a course about the social and historical processes that gave rise to “modernity.” Its texts — written from the mid-1800s to the period between the world wars — are the classic statements on the modern world written by Karl Marx, Alexis de Tocqueville, Ferdinand Tönnies, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmel. According to these writers, the process of the formation of modern societies includesfour major processes — the economic, the political, the social, and the cultural — and can be traced to developments that followed the decline of feudalism in Western Europe. Each of them contributed theories about one or more of these processes, but we identify Marx as the preeminent thinker about the “economy” as a distinct sphere of social life, just as we identify Weber and Simmel with a cultural sociology thatemphasizes religion as a force for profound change in the early modern era. Tocqueville, a writer on the historical origins of the French Revolution, is the author of the first work on the “democratic revolution” of the nineteenth century. Throughout the course, we will return to the examination of how each of the processes were used by these writers to trace the emergence of modern societies and how these processes contributed to the distinct character of the modern world.

SOCI 6101 Contemporary Social Theory
This course will discuss theoretical approaches of the social sciences in the US and Western Europe including Marxism, behaviorism, phenomenology, and structuralism. This course in contemporary social theory outlines some of the new and distinguishing theories and methods of the period from mid-twentieth century until the present; it understands these theories as parts of other contemporary cultural formations and discourses: sociology has always been (and has to be) a discipline that is peculiarly permeable to changes in the moral and political temper of its time, but it is also a discipline that registers changes in its sister disciplines (anthropology, political science, history, social philosophy), so changes in these fields will also reverberate in ours (and sociology will direct disciplinary changes in other disciplines as well).

SOCI 6125 An Ethics of Modern Selfhood
This is a course in the field of historical and cultural sociology. The course follows the recent argumentof Richard B. Miller (2005) and others who argue that the study of culture offers a number of resources for the study of ethics and religious ethics, one that pays close attention to the use of rhetorics and genres in everyday life and popular culture. The principal focus of the course is the modern culture of self or identity which is examined as a series of personal and moral conflicts and dilemmas: those of public and private life; of “society” (or community) and the “individual”; the conflict of rationality over emotionality (and control and release); of personal freedom (“choice”) and social control (determination); and the more recent conflicts concerning personal freedom and individuality (and the individual’s mind) in the face of the growth of “mass society” and its “mass culture.” In various texts and discourses—modern novels, political and sociological treatises, films, personal memoirs—these conflicts are given expression and can be studied as a modern and postmodern discourse about selfhood today in which we can discover some of the principal moral dilemmas of persons today. In and through various texts and images we can begin to address the question, “What is a self today?” What are the special problem and ethical dilemmas of our worlds and ourselves as modern and postmodern “subjects”?

SOCI 6553 Demography, Human Rights, and Ethics

The course examines human rights and ethical issues as they arise in the field of population studies. Within this broad area, emphasis will be given to population policies and programs related to abortion, Eugenics, euthanasia, fertility regulation, and ; the use of population data systems to target individuals and vulnerable population subgroups for human rights abuses; the impact of national laws or policies prohibiting data collection and analysis related to specific topics or population subgroups; and the role of demographicanalysis in documenting and studying genocide, discriminatory educational programs, or inequities in the criminal justice system. Many of these issues involve complex interactions amongcauses and impacts. The goal of the course is not to resolve the various issues examined, but to help us all think with greater clarity about these and related issues, their interconnectedness andtheir broader implications for demography, human rights, ethics.

SOCI 6717
Crime and Punishment
This is a course about the social and historical processes that gave rise to “modernity.” Its texts — written from the mid-1800s to the period between the world wars — are the classic statements on the modern world written by Karl Marx, Alexis de Tocqueville, Ferdinand Tönnies, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and Georg Simmel. According to these writers, the process of the formation of modern societies includes four major processes — the economic, the political, the social, and the cultural — and can be traced to developments that followed the decline of feudalism in Western Europe. Each of them contributed theories about one or more of these processes, but we identify Marx as the preeminent thinker about the “economy” as a distinct sphere of social life, just as we identify Weber and Simmel with a cultural sociology that emphasizes religion as a force for profound change in the early modern era. Tocqueville, a writer on the historical origins of the FrenchRevolution, is the authorof the first work on the “democratic revolution” of the nineteenth century. Throughout the course, we will return to the examination of how each of the processes wer e used by these writers to trace the emergence of modern societies and how these processes contributed to the distinct character of the modern world.

THEOLOGY

THEO 6400 Theological Anthropology and Human Diversity
As the subdiscipline of theological anthropology speaks about the nature of our being human, how does it take into account the great variety and diversity in evidence among human beings?  How do the human particularities of race, religion, culture, disability, sexual orientation andgender inform currents in theological anthropology? What theoretical frameworks ground the portraits of our being human today? While the course is not an investigation of theory per se, we will see how various theoretical lenses and religious perspectives impact the articulation of constructive theologies. The contemporary discourses on personhood will be placed in conversation with classic texts of Christian theological anthropology.

THEO 6672 Feminist Theology
This team-taught course will investigate contemporary strands of feminist theology, their precedents and the directions they may take for the future. We will explore feminist theology in historical and contemporary perspective, introducing key theologians and themes with attention to the distinctiveness of a feminist methodology. Drawing on ecumenical and interreligious resources, the design of the course includes especially the contemporary voices of feminist theologians in the New York City area. The goal of this exploration will be for students to have a broad understanding of the major strands of feminist theology, to understand feminist methods, to think critically about how feminist theology engages with other methodologies in contemporary systematics, and to join the current conversation in crafting the future of feminist theology. Generations of feminist, womanist, mujerista theologians will be brought together, modeling the dialogical practice from which this theology emerges. The investigation will be both historical and thematic, asking questions of each work through the categories of ‘sin’ and ‘salvation’.

THEO 6676  Sexual Ethics
This course will look at a series of ethical issues related to marriage and sexuality, including methodological concerns such as uses of scripture, connections with theological anthropology, or implications of social science findings. Social ethical aspects of Roman Catholic sexual ethics will be explored, and Catholic sexual teachings will be placed in the context of broader discussions in Christian ethics. The course will be designed toprepare students for teaching a pastoral work,as well as for future scholarly work.

THEO 5640 Introduction to Theological Ethics
This seminar will introduce the fundamentals of Christian ethics in the Catholic and Protestant traditions: sources of normative ethics (scripture, tradition, philosophy, experience); approaches (natural law, divine command, deontology, virtue, narrative); methods (liberationist [Latino, Black and Asian], feminist, and queer); and foundational thinkers and texts, both historical and contemporary. We will then apply these fundamentals to a variety of contemporary topics including faith and public life, racial and gender justice, conflict resolution, marriage and family, ecological justice, and sexuality.

THEO 6732 Ethics and Economics
An examination of contemporary economic social issues with the aid of Catholic social teaching, and with a critical use of economic science. The social issues examined include-but arenot limited to-poverty, pollution control, protectionism, unemployment, and inflation.

THEO 6733  Theology and Science
This graduate-level course attends to the history, methodologies, content of conflict, and major questions that have occured at the intersections of scientific and theological inquiry.

THEO 6734 The Beauty of Justice
This course explores potential intersections between theories of "the beautiful" and "the good" in both classic and contemporary Christian theology and ethics. It also examines practical examples of this intersection in the lived practices of the Christian community in order to evaluate the viability of a faith that seeks beauty for addressing a variety of social justice problems including environmental racism, urban poverty, conflict resolution, and global health.  

THEO 6735 Ecological Ethics
This course considers the rise of ecological consciousness, environmental history, and ethical reflection in light of western philosophical and theological traditions. It aims to provide students with substantial, foundational knowledge in twentieth and twenty-first century environmental thought as well as emerging approaches to global environmental problems.

THEO 6740  Catholic Social Thought
Catholic social thought as found in the social encyclicals, emphasizing their theological contexts, social scientific constructs, historical background and philosophical presuppositions.

THEO 7736  Bioethics
Confusion reigns supreme when it comes todiscussion of medical bioethics: whether in a hospital ethics committee, presidential debate, an academic journal, or over a pint in a pub. It is more often characterized by people talking past each other than about discussion of the even the same topic—to say nothing of actually making progress on a particular issue. For instance, three very different topics—the personhood of the fetus, the permissibility of ever killing the fetus, and public policy about the personhood or killing of the fetus—areoften unhelpfully lumped together into arguments over a single topic: abortion. This course attempts to deal with several classic and timely topics in medical ethics in a way that cuts through the confusion by dealing with the each of the three kinds of issues (moral status, killing/treatment/care, and public policy) systematically. The course will emphasize the Roman Catholic moral traditions in doing so, but it will almost always be in conversation with other ethical traditions (religious and secular) as well. Key points not only of disagreement, but, importantly, agreement will be emphasized in an attempt to at least get the issues straightand, perhaps, move the debate forward.

GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SERVICE

SWGS 6014 Women, Work and Poverty
This transverse elective course focuses on low income and working class women in the United States taking an interdisciplinary perspective on issues of race, class and gender, and striving to understand their effects on women's quality of life and opportunities for advancement. More specifically, theory and empirical research are harnessed to examine the causes of women's poverty and economic dependence, women's experiences in the family and the workplace, and the impact of public policy on women. Various strategies for social change are critically analyzed as vehicles for achievingeconomic justice and parityfor women.

SWGS 6050 Human Rights and Social Justice
Foundations of the Human Rights Social Justice Perspective in Social Work.

SWGS 6109  Capacity Building with Faith Communities: Meeting the Challenges of Poverty
This course will introduce students to capacity building with the faith community on behalf of the poor. The stage will be set to consider the role of social work and faith communities through review of poverty in the U.S., the incumbent challenges the poor experience, and the role that different faith traditions have based on their belief in social justice as a lived mission. Specific methods for capacity building will include asset-based community development, use of a strengths perspective, empowerment practice and building sanctuary and understanding social work traditions of community development, advocacy and community-based clinical practice. Students will be introduced to faith capacity building initiatives in New York City, for example: housing collaboratives, congregational organizing, alternatives to incarceration – creating refuge and sanctuary, mentoring programs for the formerly homeless, and emergency food services.

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