Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


CONTENT COURSES
 

Content courses, available to students in Levels 4-6, are centered on the subject in the course title.  Students enrolled in content courses learn about a topic of interest while developing the language skills needed to succeed in an American university.  Reading, writing, speaking/discussion, and grammar skills are integrated into the content study. 

Summer 2014:
Monday & Wednesday OR Tuesday & Thursday, 1:00 -4:00 pm, $750.00


Click on course title for a description

American Business English American Social Sciences
Psychology through Literature Modern Short Fiction
The US Supreme Court Jesuit Spirituality
Presentations and Public Speaking The American Novel
American History The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Philosophy of Eastern Thought Current Events
American Culture & History Through the Arts New York City
American Government and Politics The American Play
Contemporary Black Studies  English for Legal Purposes*

American Business English
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic practices and vocabulary used in American business. Students acquire a general knowledge of investment, the stock market and economic principles. The language skills emphasized are the productive skills of speaking and writing.

Psychology through Literature
Writers have understood human nature long before psychologists ever existed. Through reading fiction, writing and discussion, we will explore how humans operate psychologically, including their needs, desires and defense mechanisms. Grammar and vocabulary within the readings and writing will also be addressed.

The US Supreme Court: Judgments that Changed America & Affected the World

Through reading, listening, discussion and writing, this course will enable students to improve their English skills by following a content-based curriculum centered around major US Supreme Court cases, the social conditions in which they occurred, and their effects on America and the world.

Presentations and Public Speaking

This course prepares students to speak with confidence in public, to deliver formal presentations with confidence and clarity of thought in front of a target audience, and to organize a presentation using charts and other props. Pronunciation, intonation and accent reduction are addressed in this course.

American History
Through a survey course of United States history from the colonial period to the present times, students will develop an understanding of historical events and cultural institutions which have shaped modern American society.  Reading and writing are the dominantskills used in this course.  The American Revolution, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, WWII, the Cold War and the rise of terrorism are the major topics of study.

Philosophy of Eastern Thought
This course will provide students with an introduction and broad overview of eastern philosophy and thought. Readings will include the philosophies of Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism and Zen Buddhism.  Students will develop cognitive skills by learning vocabulary, reading, writing, advanced grammar, and class or group discussion.

American Culture and History through the Arts
This speaking-oriented course provides students with the opportunity to learn about multiple aspects of American culture through a variety of traditional and innovative art forms: visual art and architecture, music and dance, poetry and drama. The skill emphasis of this course is on speaking in reaction to what is viewed or observed, and heard.

American Government and Politics
This course is designed for advanced ESL students to have an understanding of the role of American government and politics by providing instruction in the function and responsibilities of American political institutions.  The executive, legislative, and judicial branches will be studied.  The role of political parties and interest groups will also be examined.  Historical political perspectives, as well as contemporary issues, will be addressed.  All skills will be practiced, and there is an emphasis on developing critical writing skills.

American Social Sciences
This course looks at the basic assumptions of American culture, plus its history, culture and economic policies. It answers the question: "Why do things happen in America the way that they do?" The course emphasizes discussion; accurate, effective reading; clear, fluent writing; and grammatical accuracy.

Modern Short Fiction
This course is an introduction to modernism in 20th century American literature, and includes the study of short stories by William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, William Saroyan and others. As we identify and define "modern," we trace the influence of the modernist style on contemporary literature. Grammar, writing and group discussion skills will be stressed.

Jesuit Spirituality
The focus of this course will be Jesuit spirituality and its effect on the personal, spiritual and moral development of a person. Through lectures, class discussions, and research papers, students will study Jesuit history, thought, its role in Catholicism and its relevance to contemporary society.

The American Novel
This course will address American Literature from a selection of novels, such as The Great Gatsby, Fahrenheit 451, and Gone With the Wind, among others.  Reading and vocabulary skills will be developed and a variety of writing styles will be studied. This course is for Levels 5 and 6.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
In this course, "the Met" is the curriculum.  Students visit the Fifth Avenue museum in pairs or groups and discuss what they have seen.  In addition, students write essays, papers and journal reports documenting areas of the museum they have covered.  Class discussions, presentations, and writing are an integral part of this course.

Current Events
Students will learn how to read, comprehend, and discuss current topics in the news with an emphasis on developing critical thinking and reading skills.  Topics include politics, the economy, entertainment, social and human interests, and science and technology.  Materials include a variety of newspapers such as the International Herald Tribune, New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, as well as CNN, FOX, and other TV, radio, and internet news sources. Students make individual and group presentations on topics of interest.

New York City
The focus of this course will be on the present day influence that New York City has on politics, economics, and culture and its effect on the global image of America.  Written assignments and animated class discussions will be required elements of this course.

The American Play
In this advanced level course, students will explore how American playwrights such as Arthur Miller, Suzan Lori Parks, Anna Deveare Smith, and August Wilson depict and dramatize complex and compelling situations.  Students will also create and develop an original playscript.

Contemporary Black Studies
This course is designed for ESL learners to deepen their knowledge about African-American art, politics, and history from the 1960s to the present.  Students will learn about New York as an African-American cultural center and will challenge their understanding of race and identity through selected readings, films, online resources, and lively in-class discussion.  All language skills will be practiced in this course, with particular emphasis on critical reading and writing skills, grammatical accuracy, and listening comprehension.

English for Legal Purposes
This course is designed to strengthen the English-language proficiency of non-native English speakers who are studying or practicing law  - Master of Laws students, visiting legal scholars, and international lawyers, in particular.  The focus of the course includes learning or reviewing the grammar, vocabulary and writing skills required in oral and written submissions at an American law school or in an American or global legal practice.


 


Site  | Directories
Submit Search Request