Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 
African and African American Studies


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Past Events

Spring 2013

BodyVOX!  - May 12 – 13, 2013

BodyVOX! is an original dance-theater-activist performance written and performed collaboratively by young women. BodyVOX! explores the curvy lines between "sexy" and "sexualized," and demands that we not just critique the media messages force-fed to girls but that we take action and ignite change. Created in an express 4-week process, our intergenerational team of artists, dancers, writers, activists and performers use performance to share our creative strategies to end the sexualization of girls, a root cause of violence against women and girls.  

Written & performed by: Amee, Courtney, Erica, Nicosie, Mia, Mia, Quien, Stephanie & Tanzina, with Emma, Nadia and Aja & the SPARKteam. Directed by: Aimee Cox & Dana Edell

Location:

Sunday May 12 at 7pm
Monday May 13 at 7pm
The Veronica Lally Kehoe Studio Theatre
Fordham University at Lincoln Center
113 West 60th Street (at Columbus Ave.)
A,C,B,D,1 trains to Columbus Ave
*Special lobby installation created by FORCE: Upsetting Rape Culture

Admission: FREE! 

BodyVOX! is a collaboration between The Department of African and African American Studies, The Theatre Program at Fordham University, viBe Theater Experience, and SPARK Movement.

BAAHP 10th Anniversary Conference
Saturday, April 6: 8:30am-5:15pm in Keating 1, Lecture Hall, Rose Hill Campus
Please join us for a conference commemorating the 10th anniversary of Fordham's Bronx African American History Project. Featuring presentations from leading historians, journalists, educators, and community organizers, the symposium will showcase research and activism related to and emanating from the Bronx African American History Project. Participants include: Joan Morgan, author of When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist, award-winning journalist, and cultural critic; Brian Purnell, assistant professor of Africana Studies, Bowdoin University; Mamadou Niang, Managing Director, NextMedia; Nancy Biberman, founder and president, WHEDco; Sheikh Moussa Drammeh, founder, African Rapid Relief Mobilization; Natasha Lightfoot, assistant professor of history, Columbia University. With remarks from special, honored guests: Joseph M. McShane, S.J., President, Fordham University; Helen D. Foster, Council Member, District 16, Bronx, NY.

Sponsors: The New York City Council, The Bronx Music Heritage Center/WHEDco.Admission is free and open to the public. RSVP is required. To RSVP visit: http://baahpconference.eventbrite.com

BAAHP 10th Anniversary Concert & Film Screening
Saturday, April 6: 5:30-11:30pm in McGinley Student Center, Rose Hill Campus
Please join us for musical performances commemorating the 10th anniversary of Fordham's Bronx African American History Project. National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master, Jimmy Owens and his band will perform the original composition, "Bronx Suite." The evening will also include a documentary film screening, live hip hop performances, and a DJ dance party! Featured performances include: At 5:30pm, "I Love the Bronx: The Musical Life of Dr. Valarie Capers," a rough-cut documentary about the acclaimed Bronx jazz pianist, directed by Dawn Russell; Bronx hip hop artists, Circa 95 and Rebel Diaz; DJ Illinoiz and DJ Charlie Hustle.Sponsors: Travis Viola and the Viola Family, The New York City Council, The Bronx Music Heritage Center/WHEDco.

Admission is free and open to the public. RSVP is required. To RSVP visit: http://theconcertbaahp10thanniversary.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Dr. Mark Naison: naison@fordham.edu or visit: www.fordham.edu/baahp

The Contradictions of Fair Hope — Film Screening and Talk Back, Friday, March 8th, 2013
Screening of the award winning documentary, The Contradictions of Fair Hope, which traces the gradual loss of tradition in one of the last remaining African American benevolent societies known as The Fair Hope Benevolent Society in Uniontown, Alabama. Executive produced by Golden Globe and Emmy winning actress, S. Epatha Merkerson, and narrated by Whoopi Goldberg, this gripping film traces the contradictions of progress, Black community identity, and economic independence in a rural African American community. To be followed by a Q&A with executive producers, S. Epatha Merkerson and Rockell Metcalf.

Download the program flyer
.

10th Anniversary Celebration & Conference of the Bronx African American History Project's (BAAHP), April 6, 2013 - The Bronx African American History Project (BAAHP) of Fordham University will celebrate its 10th anniversary on Saturday, April 6, 2013.

Televising the Revolution: Critical Media and the Public with Dr. Tukufu Zuberi from the PBS series, The History Detectives, Friday, April 12th 2013 Join Dr. Tukufu Zuberi, former chair of the Sociology Department at the University of Pennsylvania and current host of the popular PBS program, The History Detectives, for a dynamic discussion on the connections between various media platforms, public scholarship and community engagement. Students, faculty and community members will find the creative interactive format of this event thought (and action) provoking!

Download the program flyer.

The Emancipation Series
In commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, the Department of African and African American Studies will sponsor a series of events during the 2013 academic year. Download the program flyer.

Burial Database Project of Enslaved African Americans – January 18, 2013
The Department of African and African American Studies served as faculty adviser to the Burial Database Project of Enslaved African Americans. The Project was created and developed with the primary goal of documenting burial grounds of enslaved African Americans in the United States. To learn more about the Burial Database Project of Enslaved African Americans, please visit www.vanishinghistory.org

Memorializing American Slavery - Saturday, February 9, 2013
January 1, 2013 marks the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. In commemoration, the Department of African and African American Studies will host the symposium Memorializing American Slavery. While many local and national sesquicentennial celebrations will focus on Abraham Lincoln as the author of the Emancipation Proclamation, we will focus on the enslaved and the problem of historical memory in contemporary American culture and society. Invited distinguished historians will include - Dr. David Blight, Professor of American History and Director of the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance & Abolition at Yale University and Dr. Annette Gordon-Reed, Pulitzer Prize for History and Professor of History and Law at Harvard University. Download the flyer.


Fall 2013

Student-Led Conference
November 2, 2013

The theme of the third student led conference is "Understanding Africa in 21st. Century." Selected students from LC and Rh campuses will be presenting their final papers at the conference. The conference will be open to students, faculty, and members of the public. We expect 12 students from both campuses to participate. Download the flyer now.


Spring 2014

Black History Month Symposium on Civil Rights in the 21st Century
Featuring keynote speaker, Kristen Clarke, Esq. and journalist Farai Chideya
Black History Month 2014 co-sponsored with Fordham Law
February 22, 11:00 a.m.
Lincoln Center Campus, 113 W. 60th Street, 12th Floor Faculty Lounge

Download the Event Flyer
Civil Rights in the 21st Century celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the 1964 Civil Rights Act will feature Keynote Speaker, Kristen Clarke, Esq., Bureau Chief Civil Rights Division, New York State Attorney General's Office and Respondent, Farai Chideya, journalist and political analyst.

The Civil Rights Act stands as the nation’s benchmark civil rights legislation, opening the door for other landmark laws including the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the Fair Housing Act of 1968 and the Americans With Disabilities Act of 1990. Despite meaningful progress achieved since passage of the Civil Rights Act, significant challenges remain and racial discrimination continues to stand as a threat to equality. Robust enforcement of civil rights laws remains necessary now more than ever to ensure that we do not roll back the fragile gains that have been made over the course of the past 50 years. Ms Clarke's presentation will focus on many of the current challenges which stand as a threat to equal justice under law and the continuing need to tackle the persistence of racial discrimination in American life.

Open to the Public. RSVP recommended but not required. Contact us at Department of African and African American Studies 212-636-6360 or 718 817-3745 or aaas@fordham.edu.

Symposium on Perspectives on National Reconciliation in South Sudan: Lessons learnt from South Africa, Rwanda, and Sudan
April 5, 2014, 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Lincoln Center Campus, McMahon Hall, Room 109

Download the event flyer
The symposium will discuss some of the challenges of political reconciliation and justice in South Sudan. The speakers will offer a fresh vision and explore policy options for peace, democracy, and development in South Sudan. Outstanding academics, policy makers, and human rights activists from South Sudan will debate possible ways of addressing these pivotal issues. The symposium will conclude by offering possible alternative perspectives for an inclusive national and political reconciliation. FREE and open to the public. Breakfast and lunch will be served.

Lecture on Cocoa, Slavery, and Colonial Africa
April 10, 2014, 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Rose Hill Campus, Walsh Library, O'Hare Special Collections - 4th Floor

Download the event flyer
Dr. Catherine Higgs, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, will be giving a lecture titled "Chocolate, Slavery, and the Humanitarian Impulse in Colonial Africa" based on her book Chocolate Islands: Cocoa, Slavery, and Colonial Africa. In Chocolate Islands, Higgs explores the competing meanings regarding the dignity of labor in colonial Africa, revealing the idealism, naivety, and racism that shaped attitudes toward Africa, even among those who sought to improve the conditions of its workers.


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