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Fall 2013 American Studies Courses at Rose Hill









Fall 2013 American Studies Courses at Rose Hill

AMST-2800-R01: AMERICAN LEGAL REASONING            
Hayes, Arthur S.
        TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM      
This course has two objectives: (I) To introduce students to the basics of legal reasoning by using Socratic dialogue, case analysis, research, and writing. (II) To give students a basic understanding of the history and operations of the U.S. Supreme Court and its impact on the American judicial and political systems, culture and economy. [H] [P]

AMST-3010-R01: APPROACHES TO AMERICAN  STUDIES (Interdisciplinary Capstone Core)

LaBennett, Oneka      M 2:30PM - 4:59PM                        

American Studies Majors and Minors Only.

An introduction to the interdisciplinary perspectives and methods of American studies, required of all American Studies majors, and typically taken in the junior year. In this course, students will gain:

   Knowledge about the history of American studies as an interdisciplinary movement--its major schools of thought, some of its influential figures, recent and emergent developments, and the conflicts and controversies that have animated work in the field;

   Understanding of several of the methodologies American studies scholars use to analyze American culture;

   Awareness of some of the major theories that influence and underpin American studies scholarship.

In the end, students will have developed the skills and knowledge necessary both for informed, rigorous reading of current publications in the field and for the production of original research of their own in future classes, including the senior thesis.


This year, the course is organized around the theme of immigration. Over the course of the semester we will trace the history of American studies scholars’ engagement with immigration, explore the methodological and theoretical tools they have deployed in their analyses, assess the value of various keywords they have used to interpret immigration in the United States, and accumulate an archive of primary sources—texts, sites, events, figures, and objects—that help us ask new questions about American culture.

 

AMST-3500-R01: THE SENIOR SEMINAR              

Peppard, Christiana & Tyler, Dennis            T 4:00PM - 6:29PM  

Seniors Only.

A seminar taught by two members of the American Studies faculty, this course provides a focused exploration of American icons and religiosity as well as examines a variety of methodological approaches to help students complete their senior essay. Students will consider several iconic forms from 20th and 21st-century America, along with tools for parsing categories of religion, religiosity, popular devotion, and public acclaim. Subjects will include media mogul Oprah Winfrey, civil rights activist and Episcopal priest Pauli Murray, and objects from material culture and popular devotion. Reading materials will be drawn from social theory, popular culture, literature and literary theory, theology and anthropology of religion. The course work will be aimed towards facilitating the design and completion of a successful senior thesis in American Studies.

AFAM-3132-R01: BLACK PRISON EXPERIENCE: (Pluralism/ Advanced Social Science Core)
Chapman, Mark L.    T 2:30PM – 5:15PM             
This course examines the historical and contemporary experience of African Americans in the prison system with a special emphasis on the role of religion as a transforming agent. Students will survey the writings of current and former prisoners and ask what role, if any, spirituality played in their experience of incarceration.  [H] [D, P]

AFAM-3134-R01 From Rock & Roll to Hip Hop

Naison, Mark.  TF 11:30-12:45

A study of urban youth culture through an examination of musical forms and their evolution from the post WWII era to the present. Begins with Rock and Roll and ends with Rap and Hip Hop. [A] [C, D]

AFAM-3146-R01: CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES: (Globalism/Advanced Social Science Core)                   
Edward, Jane K.     TF 11:30AM - 12:45PM
This course explores the experiences of contemporary African immigrants in the United States with particular focus on immigrant experiences from Sub-Saharan African. The course is designed to introduce students to contemporary literature, theoretical and methodological issues concerning the study of African immigration and the history of recent African immigration to the United States.  It will explore migratory processes of Africans both within the continent and across international borders. Through lectures based on selected readings, class discussions, and educational audiovisual materials, the course will discuss the following topics: reasons for migration, or what motivated many Africans to migrate to the United States; migration and settlement patterns in the host society; adjustment to life in America; the formation of national and transnational identities in the context of race and ethnic relations within the American society; changes in gendered and generational roles and relations; and the socio-cultural, economic, political, and intellectual contributions of African immigrants to the host societies as well as their linkages with their communities in Africa. [H] [D, P]


AFAM-4000-R01: AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: AMERICAN DREAM (Senior Values)

Naison, Mark
  TF 8:30AM - 9:45AM           
As we enter the 21st century, few subjects have the power to arouse more controversy and confusion among Americans than affirmative action.  What began in the middle 1960's as a moral imperative to help African-Americans overcome 300 years of exclusion from American institutions has evolved into a wide variety of practices to help disfranchised and under represented groups gain access to employment, education, and business opportunities. Although equal opportunity remains a valued goal of most Americans,  some of the methods employed by government agencies, educational institutions and businesses to achieve race and gender representation in the distribution of scarce resources have aroused great opposition.  In the last twenty years,  affirmative action programs in cities and states have been challenged by public referenda (two of which, in California and in Washington, have been successful), have been overturned by actions of a state legislature ( Governor Jeb Bush’s “One Florida Initiative) and have been the subject of hundreds of lawsuits, several of which have resulted in Supreme Court decisions. Most recently, the United States Supreme Court, responding to a court challenge to the use of race in admissions by the University of Michigan, voted to approve the affirmative action plan of the University of Michigan Law School, while rejecting the one used by University’s undergraduate college. Further court challenges to affirmative action can be expected, and the whole subject has been given new life by the election of Barack Obama, who self-identifies as Black and bi-racial, as President of the United States. Some people believe that election of a Black president has ushered in a new “post-racial era in American history;” others argue that whites are now the group most in need of protection. One thing that is certain- debates over affirmative action, and the meaning of race in America, are not going away any time soon.
[H] [P]

ANTH-2700-R01: YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT: ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD

Krasinski, Kathryn.
TBA.
As the center of all significant human rituals and ceremonies, food is studied by a range ofnatural and social scientists. For the anthropologist, food is connected to the human body and health, social relations, identity, and even ideology; we are literally what we eat.  This course examines the role food plays in shaping cultural practices throughout the world. Students will explore changing concepts of food through time beginning with early humans, modes of food production, preparation, and consumption. Through primary literature, lectures, local ethnic markets, and sharing meals throughout the semester, this class will immerse you in the theoretical and empirical significance of the cross-cultural significance of food. Bon appétit!  


AMCS-3320-R01: THE WRITING IRISH

O’Donnell, Angela. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

This course will explore the influence of Catholicism on the development of Irish and Irish-American Literature from the early 20th century to the present. Featuring Irish- and American-born writers of Irish ancestry, the course will focus on the work of writes such as James Joyce, Patrick Kavanaugh, Seamus Heaney, Eavan Boland, Mebh McGuckian, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Kennedy, Elizabeth Cullinan, Frank O’Hara, Alice McDermott and Michael Donaghy. Through selected historical and critical readings, we will attempt to create a descriptive narrative of what happens when Irish writers wrestle with Catholic identity in the context of 20th-century political and economic struggle, both in Ireland and in America, and a growing culture of unbelief.
 This is an EP3 Seminar. [L] [D,C]

AMCS-3340-R01: CATHOLICISM AND DEMOCRACY
Gould, William.  MR 10:00AM-11:15AM

Examines the relationship between Catholicism and democracy, placing particular stress on their relevance to contemporary American public life. In this context, Catholicism will be understood not only as a religious institution, but as the source of a tradition of communitarian social and political thought, while democracy will be understood not only as a form of government, but also as an ethos shaping American society. Authors and texts will include Alexis de Tocqueville, Orestes Brownson, Dorothy Day, John Courtney Murray, and relevant documents from Vatican II and the American hierarchy. The historic tension between Catholicism and democracy will be the subject of our conversation as will the possibilities for greater harmony between them. In particular, we will explore the possibility that Catholicism’s communitarian orientation might serve as a corrective to American individualism and consumerism, while democratic institutions and practices might have something to offer Catholicism.
This is an EP3 Seminar.
[R,H] [D, P]

COMM-2525-R01: DIGITAL MEDIA & CYBERCULTURE
Marwick, Alice E.  MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description to be added soon.

COMM-2602-R01: MYTH & SYMBOL OF AMERICAN CHARACTER (Pluralism)
Capo, James A.  T 6:00PM-8:30PM

Description to be added soon.

COMM-3103-R01: VER CENSORSHIP/FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Instructor TBA. T 6:00PM-8:30PM

Description to be added soon.

COMM-3108-R02: MOVIES AND THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (Pluralism)                  
Instructor TBA.  T 6:00PM - 8:30PM
Lab Fee.
A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present. [C]

COMM-3110-R01: PEACE, JUSTICE AND THE MEDIA
Instructor TBA. MR 10:00AM – 11:15AM             

This course analyzes the ways in which the media represent the issues of peace and justice. Considering the relevance of peace and justice for democratic practices, the variety of media depictions of such issues will be analyzed. Topics such as environmental and economic justice, poverty and the poor, race and gender, war and peace, and media ethics and values will be covered.
[A] [C, P]

COMM-3111-R01: GENDER IMAGES IN MEDIA                 
Instructor TBA. MR 10:00AM - 11:15AM
Description to be added soon. [A] [C]

COMM-3112-R01: MEDIA LAW (Advanced Social Science Core)            
Hayes, Arthur S.                    TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM
Juniors and Seniors Only.
This course is designed to introduce the communication and media studies major to the basic issues in the field of media law. Examined here are the Constitutional principles underlying the major Supreme Court cases that have established the parameters governing the use of communication technologies in the country. Special focus will be given to the various legal changes posed by new media. Juniors and Seniors only. [A, H] [P]

COMM-3205-R01: THE JOURNALIST & THE LAW (Advanced Social Science Core)
Instructor TBA. W 6:30PM - 9:00PM

Juniors and Seniors Only.
An investigation of the legal concerns of the working journalist: prior restraint, shield law, libel, invasion of privacy, the Freedom of Information Act. [A, H] [P]

COMM-3309-R01: CHILDREN AND MEDIA           
Freeman, Lewis I.      MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM
Juniors and Seniors Only. Prereq: COMM 1010 & 1011 COMM majors or permission of instructor.
This course explores the controversy surrounding children's media. Topics such as the role of media in socialization and learning, the effects of media content and communication technologies on children's behavior, thought and emotions are examined. The functions that media perform for children, and the efforts to design media specifically for children are considered. Various forms such as television, popular music, film, video games, fairy tales and children's literature are explored. [H] [P]

COMM-3310-R01: TV COMEDY & AMERICAN VALUES
Tueth, Michael. TF 1:00-2:15PM

Description to be added soon.

COMM-3451-R01: FILMS OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK
Instructor TBA. M 6:00PM-8:30PM

Rose Hill Students Only. Lab Fee.

A critical examination of Hitchcock's cinema. Students explore Hitchcock's major films, including Rear Window, Vertigo and Psycho from a variety of perspectives, including psychoanalytic, narrative and feminist theory. Emphasis on Hitchcock's role in the British and American studio systeand his mastery of cinematic technique and language. [A] [C]

COMM-3476-R01: ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDIA
Intructor TBA. T 6:00PM - 8:30PM            

Juniors and Seniors Only.        

What do newspaper and magazine editors, public relations officers in universities and corporations, advertising executives, entertainment moguls, search engine operators, and broadcast news directors have in common? Media professionals like these face challenging moral dilemmas on a daily basis. Issues such as honesty, privacy, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and offensive content, among others, require those who work in media industries to make ethical decisions that balance individual considerations with institutional pressures. This course provides students with tools for making more knowledgeable and principled judgments about the ethics of media. Using a moral reasoning method based on philosophy, media practice, and critical thinking, we will work together to encourage each other’s problem-solving skills, to heighten our sensitivity to ethical issues, and to develop our ability to examine different points of view in a systematic manner.
[A] [C, P]

COMM-3505-R01: HISTORY & CULTURE OFADVERTISING
Andersen, Robin K.    MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM
This course will assess the impact of promotional and commercial messages on the many spheres of modern life including; the environmental, psychological, socio-cultural and political levels.  Advertising will be analyzed within the broader context of consumer culture and understood as a form of social communication. We discuss a range of topics from personal to cultural practices, from identity to branding, and from political ads to Internet promotions and beyond. Advertising messages and their visual and textual strategies of persuasion will be explored as we investigate the language of images and the dynamics between cultural icons and popular tastes. The relationship between advertising, marketing and the mass media will also be explored. The influences of marketing practices and advertising messages on the commercial media will be covered. Finding connections between contemporary research practices, focus groups and marketing designs, helps us understand the ways in which promotional strategies influence the media environment. Other topic areas such as the representations of gender, nature and the environment, as well as war-themed promotions will be given attention. [D, P]

COMM-3681-R01: MEDIA AND NATIONAL IDENTITY (Advanced Social Science Core/Globalism)
Instructor TBA.  TF 1:00PM-2:15PM
An examination of case studies showing how national identity is inferred and organized by mass media. Questions include: How is nationalism produced by media discourse? How are outsiders portrayed? Who draws the boundaries between inside and outside, and how? Texts will include television, radio, print journalism, music and films. [C]

COMM-4001-R01: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE (Value Seminar / Eloquentia Perfecta 4)
Tueth, Michael.  TF 2:30PM-3:45PM

Description to be added soon.

COMM-4402-R01: VALUES IN THE NEWS (Value Seminar / Eloquentia Perfecta 4)
Capo, James A.           T 2:30PM – 5:15PM
An examination of how news constructs and mediates personal and social values. This course considers how news frames discourse about reality, and then analyzes the framing of specific values, ethical issues and moral behaviors. [H] [C, P]

COMM-4603-R01: MEDIA & POPULAR CULTURE             
Instructor TBA.  MR 4:00PM-5:15PM        
An exploration of various forms of contemporary popular culture and their meanings in modern life. Theoretical approaches are discussed and various media texts such as film, television, advertising images, popular icons, music and style are analyzed. [A] [C]

ECON-3453-R01: LAW AND ECONOMICS (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Themeli, Booi             MR 10:00AM - 11:15AM      
Prereq: ECON 1200.
This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. [H] [P]

ECON-3453-R02: LAW AND ECONOMICS (Advanced Social Science Core)  
Themeli, Booi             MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM
Prereq: ECON 1200.
This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. [H] [P]

ECON-3850-R02: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS : (Advanced Social Science Core)
Conte, Marc N.  MR 11:30PM - 12:45PM                

Prereq: ECON 1100 or ECON 1200.
Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies, from reducing air and water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone depleting gases. However, the environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike. [H] [P]

ECON-4110-R01: ETHICS & ECONOMICS (Senior Values)           
Themeli, Booi
             MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM                  
Rose Hill Seniors Only.

This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution and economic sanctions.  [H] [P]


ECON-4110-R02: ETHICS & ECONOMICS (Senior Values)

Tueth, Michael S
                     MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM           
Rose Hill Seniors Only.

This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution and economic sanctions.  [H] [P]


ENGL-3067-R01: CONTEMPORARY WOMEN POETS

O’Donnell, Angela. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

In this course, students will read poetry written by women poets in the 20th and 21st centuries with a focus on the imaginative representation of women’s lived experience.  We will read the work of poets who address the themes of feminine embodiment and sexuality, women’s roles as mothers and daughters, women’s work (both professional and domestic), and the role poetry plays in enabling women to discover a language to contain their experience. Our emphasis will be on women who are currently writing, but we will also explore the work of the some of the most influential predecessors of contemporary women poets.   Among the poets we will read are Sylvia Plath, Ann Sexton, Elizabeth Bishop, Rita Dove, Anna Swir, Adrienne Rich, Eavan Boland, Louise Erdrich, Mary Karr, and A.E. Stallings.  In addition to their poems, we will read critical essays by these poets that shed light on their own work and on the contributions of women poets to contemporary poetry.  We will also have at least one writer visit class and offer a poetry reading on campus.
This is an EP3 Seminar.
[L] [D,C]

ENGL-3333-R01: CAPTIVES/CANNIBALS/REBELS
Holm, Melanie D. TF 10:00AM-11:15AM

Cannibals, captives, and rebels are everywhere in early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think about why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and what they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; authors may include Mary Rowlandson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Eliza Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle. Rose Hill Sophmores and Juniors only.   

[L] [C]

ENGL-3333-R02: CAPITVES/CANNIBALS/REBELS
Holm, Melanie D. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Cannibals, captives, and rebels are everywhere in early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think about why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and what they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; authors may include Mary Rowlandson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Eliza Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle. Rose Hill Sophmores and Juniors only.   

[L] [C]

ENGL-3359-R01: ASIAN DIASPORIC LITERATURE

Kim, James Y.  TF 11:30-12:45PM

Description to be added soon.


ENGL-3653-R01: MAJOR AMERICAN AUTHORS

Instructor TBA. TR 5:30PM-6:45PM

This course provides an introduction to major American authors. [L] [C]


ENGL-3662-R01: POSTWAR & U.S. LIT &
CULTURE (Eloquentia Perfecta 3/ Interdisciplinary Capstone Core)
Contreras, Daniel T.  TF 10:00AM-11:15AM

This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.
[L][C]


ENGL-4129-R01: 4 MODERN CATHOLIC WRITERS (VALUE SEMINAR / ELOQUENTIA PERFECTA 4)

Giannone, Richard.  T 2:30PM-5:15PM
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This seminar will consider the writings of Dorothy Day (1897-1980), Thomas Merton (1915-1968), Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), and Walker Percy (1916-1990). These four authors, who arguably can be termed reformers as wel as artists in their own right, are the principal critics of the modern Catholic predicament before and after World War II. Each in her or his way saw a church in drastic need of rebuilding and sought to restore what had collapsed and had been left unheeded by what was essentially an immigrant institution. [L, R] [C]

HIST-3657-R01: AMERICAN CONSTITUTION (ADVANCED HISTORY CORE, AMERICAN STUDIES)
Cornell, Saul A.  TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description to be added soon.

HIST-3843-R01: AMERICAN DRUG WAR
Wolfe, Noel.  MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

Drugs have played a significant role in American political and legal discourses of the 20th
century.  Increased focus on drug abuse resulted in an increase in the regulation of drugs, criminal prosecution and incarceration of drug users and sellers.  This course will examine the history of drug use, abuse and regulation in the United States beginning with the mid-19th century.  This course will also explore the impact of drugs on American culture.  [H] [P] [D]

HIST-3857-R01: AMERICA SINCE 1945
Instructor TBA. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

Integrating economic, political and social history, this course will explore the development of the American economy, paying particular attention to transformations in the nature of work and labor relations. [H] [P]

HIST-3905-R01: AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY: HISTORY & ART
Swinth, Kirsten N.  Time TBA.

Description to be added soon.

HIST-3909-R01: FILM, FICTION, POWER
Dietrich, Christopher. W 11:30AM-2:00PM

What sorts of themes do authors, screen-writers, and directors try to sell in the marketplace of popularculture? How do they reflect relations of international power? What do these reflections on power reveal about American society, its politics, and its place in the world?  The goal of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of how visual and written representations of American power have influenced, challenged, and even transformed the U.S. relations in the world.  With their capacity to reach millions in accessible forms, films and fiction do more than tell stories or entertain audiences.  They have the unparalleled means to shape values and beliefs about power.  They convey the social mores of the period in which they were produced.   They address attitudes not only toward the practice and nature of American power, but also toward associated topics, including the morality of war, definitions of heroism, the depiction of enemies, and the ethical responsibility of individuals.
[H, L] [P,C]

PHIL-3720-R01: AFRICAN AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY (PLURALISM)
Green, Judith.  MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

Description to be added soon.

PHIL-4302-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & ETHICS (Eloquentia Perfecta 3/ Pluralism/ Interdisciplinary Capstone Core)        
Van Buren, Edward J.                        TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM
This seminar studies national and global environmental problems and policies with regard to the values or ethical questions involved in them. As such, it combines the disciplines of environmental policy (predominantly a social science field) and environmental ethics (predominantly a humanities field), both of which are by themselves interdisciplinary fields incorporating the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and applied arts and sciences. Environmental policy, often called environmental studies, is the interdisciplinary study of the creation, evolution, implementation and effectiveness of environmental policies that address national and global environmental problems such as climate change, placing particular emphasis on the use of history, anthropology, psychology, economics, sociology, and politics. Environmental ethics is the interdisciplinary study of the values or ethical dimensions of environmental problems and policies, with particular emphasis on the use of philosophy, history, literature, art and religion. Both disciplines emerged with the growing awareness of a national and global environmental crisis in the 1960s and 1970s. [R, H]

PHIL-4302-R02: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & ETHICS (Eloquentia Perfecta3/ Pluralism/ Interdisciplinary Capstone Core)        
Van Buren, Edward J.                        TF 11:30AM - 12:45PM
This seminar studies national and global environmental problems and policies with regard to the values or ethical questions involved in them. As such, it combines the disciplines of environmental policy (predominantly a social science field) and environmental ethics (predominantly a humanities field), both of which are by themselves interdisciplinary fields incorporating the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and applied arts and sciences. Environmental policy, often called environmental studies, is the interdisciplinary study of the creation, evolution, implementation and effectiveness of environmental policies that address national and global environmental problems such as climate change, placing particular emphasis on the use of history, anthropology, psychology, economics, sociology, and politics. Environmental ethics is the interdisciplinary study of the values or ethical dimensions of environmental problems and policies, with particular emphasis on the use of philosophy, history, literature, art and religion. Both disciplines emerged with the growing awareness of a national and global environmental crisis in the 1960s and 1970s. [R, H]

POSC-2102-R01: INTRO TO URBAN POLITICS (Pluralism)
Hinze, Annika M.  TF 10:00AM-11:15AM
A study of politics and power within urban political systems, including an examination of their historical development, current political economy, and prospects for the future.

POSC-3121-R01: NEW YORK CITY POLITICS (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core)
Berg, Bruce    MR 10:00AM - 11:15AM
An analysis of the New York City political system. Attention will be paid to the participants in New York City government and politics, the factors that influence policy making in New York City, as well as public policies produced by the system. [H] [P]

POSC-3209-R01: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (Advanced Social Science Core)                  
Hume, Robert J.  MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM
A casebook analysis of central issues of constitutional law. Examines the Constitution's origins, judicial review, federalism, separation and balance of powers, domestic and foreign affairs, the commerce clause, substantive due process, the rise of the administrative state, philosophies of interpretation. Presents the Constitution as defining a structure of government, rights and political economy. Examines the Constitution's role in American political development and democracy. [H] [P]

POSC-3217-R01: THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Cohen, Jeffrey E.  TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM                 
An examination of presidential leadership, including the development, growth, and exercise of presidential power. Includes analysis of republican foundations of the presidency, organization and operation of office, role in domestic and foreign policy, relations with Congress, and the importance of character. [H] [P]

POSC-3230-R01: LAW & SOCIETY (Advance Social Science Core)
Hume, Robert J.  MR 4:00PM-5:15PM

Description to be added soon.

POSC-3307-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS (Advanced Social Science Core)           
Fleisher, Richard                    TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM            
The course will deal with understanding how and why the political process leads to the types of policy choices affecting the environment that have been made by governmental actors rather than a policy oriented course in which the substantive alternatives for public policy in the area are examined and evaluated in some detail. [H] [P]

POSC-3317-R01: MEDIA & PUBLIC OPINON (Advanced Social Science Core)
McDermott, Monika L.  TF 2:30PM-3:45PM

Description to be addedsoon.

POSC-4100-R01: SEMINAR: AMERICAN POLITICS
Cohen, Jeffrey E.  R 2:30PM-4:30PM

Description to be added soon.

POSC-4210-R01: SEMINAR: STATE, FAMILY & SOCIETY (Senior Values)         
Berg, Bruce    M 2:30PM - 5:15PM             
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This seminar will examine the relationship between political systems and the family by exploring the connection between varying philosophical/ideological perspectives on state intervention in the family. Public policy issues to be discussed will include marriage and divorce, adoption and foster care, child care, family and child autonomy and child and domestic abuse. [H] [P]

PSYC-3600-R01: MULTICULTURAL ISSUES (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core)           
Instructor TBA.  TF 2:30PM - 3:45PM                   
Prereq: PSYC 1000.
As the United States becomes increasingly diverse, it is important to understand the variety of cultures that make up this diversity. This course will serve to increase students’ awareness of multicultural topics such as discrimination and prejudice. We are all members of various social groups, therefore, much of the course will be based on students’own experiences with their own and other social groups. [H] [D]

SOCI-2701-R01: INTRO TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE              
Sweet, Kerry R.  TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM
An overview of the criminal justice system: law, its sociology, and its social and political functions. A critical examination of law enforcement agencies, the judicial system, and corrections. [H] [P]

SOCI-2925-R01: MEDIA CRIME SEX VIOLENCE               
Sweet, Kerry R.  TF 8:30AM - 9:45AM                   
An analysis of mass media reporting, presentation and explanation. [A, H] [P]

SOCI-2965-R01: SCIENCE FICTION & SOCIAL CRISIS                
Wormser, Richard L.  W 11:30AM - 2:00PM
In a dreamworld inhabited by battle weary heroes and heroines who confront alien forces, where machines find human beings disposable and wizards' spells sometimes fail, where madmen create monsters that threaten humanity, we enter a realm in which science fiction often stands as a metaphor for the human condition, resurrecting quasi-mythological perceptions that have all but vanished in our nonfictional scientific world. Through the use of selected readings, feature films and lectures, this course will examine the sociological insights that science fiction films and literature offer about how we live our lives in the "here and now" of the post modern world. [L, A] [C]

SOCI-3136-R01: INEQUALITY-WHY/EFFECTS (Pluralism/Interdisciplinary Captsone Core)
Miyawaki, Michael H.  MR 10:00AM-11:15AM
Description to be added soon.

SOCI-3400-R01: GENDER, BODIES, SEXUALITY: (Pluralism)                  
Avishai-Bentovim, Orit
  T 2:30PM - 5:15PM          
This course explores how gender shapes our lives and the world around us, including our definitions and experiences of sexuality. Rather than simple biological differences, we will examine gender and sexuality as social constructions, as social relations, as contested sets of cultural meanings, as lived experiences, and as dimensions of social structure. Course materials include theoretical writings, empirical studies, autobiographical reflections, and films. These materials will inspire us to consider the social, economic, and cultural institutions and forces that shape our lives. The study of gender and sexuality is very broad in scope, and in this course we will focus on gender as a key dimension of all social structure and institutions, with a particular interest in the intersection between gender and sexuality and the shaping of gendered and sexed bodies. My hope is that you will develop a “gender lens,” a perspective on the sources and consequences of social constructs and social inequalities that shape the modern social institutions that we inhabit, such as schools, the workplace, the state, and the family. This includes a critical evaluation of widespread assumptions about gender that we often take for granted, such as the naturalness of categories of man” and “woman,” “femininity” and “masculinity” and “heterosexual” and “homosexual.” [H] [D]


SOCI-3405-R01: GENDER, RACE, CLASS (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core
Kurti, Zhandarka MR 5:30PM - 6:45PM
                  
The primary purpose of this course is to study how the interconnections of gender, race and class, shape the structure of our society and affect how we relate to each other and the world around us. The course begins by examining gender, race and class as sociological concepts, with the purpose of using this framework to analyze and interpret contemporary social problems in the United States. The course is divided into two parts. The first part will examine gender, race and class in a conceptual and sociological framework to provide insight of how these social categories intersect in the social structure and have produced a highly stratified and unequal society. We will focus on how these categories intersect and directly affect the lived experience of populations in the United States through an examination of various issues such as unemployment and healthcare. In the second part of the class, we will move from the local to the global and examine the impact of globalization on our society, again through the lens of gender, race, class and sexuality. This class will use a wide range of historical documents, cartoons, films and documentaries to provide further insight into how gender, race and class shape our everyday experiences. [H] [D, P]


SOCI-3456-R01: MODERN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core)                  

Bilous, Adriane
  MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM        
American social movements and political protests have been vehicles of change and sometimes of resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and culture? Through theoretical and empirical assessment, this course introduces students to movements that have formed over such issues as poverty, racism, sexism, and environmental degradation.  Particular emphasis is given to diversity among social movement actors and the opportunities and challenges presented for social movements in a pluralist society. The last segment of the course will focus on the future of social movements, including the effects of recent challenges posed by globalization and growth in corporate power. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-3456-R02: MODERN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS: (Pluralism/ Advanced Social Science)             
Bush, Evelyn.  TF 8:30AM - 9:45AM

American social movements and political protests have been vehicles of change and sometimes of resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and culture? Through theoretical and empirical assessment, this course introduces students to movements that have formed over such issues as poverty, racism, sexism, and environmental degradation.  Particular emphasis is given to diversity among social movement actors and the opportunities and challenges presented for social movements in a pluralist society. The last segment of the course will focus on the future of social movements, including the effects of recent challenges posed by globalization and growth in corporate power. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-3601-R01: URBAN POVERTY (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core)           
Rhomberg, Christopher  MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM
                 
This course deals with contemporary issues and problems in cities, with a special focus on residential segregation and urban poverty. [H] [P]

SOCI-4961-R01: URBAN ISSUES & POLICIES                   
Rosenbaum, Emily V. T 2:30PM - 5:15PM    
Description to be added soon.           

SOCI-4970-R01: COMMUNITY SERVICE AND SOCIAL ACTION: (Senior Values)        
Rodriguez,Orlando     MR 4:00PM – 5:15PM
Community Service Required.
This course will deepen students understanding of the meaning of community service and social action in America and challenge them to confront the moral issues and social commitments necessary to be members of a just democratic society. [H] [D, P]

SPAN-3002-R01: LAT. AM: LIT/CULTURE SURVEY
Vich, Cynthia M.  MR 11:30-12:45PM

Description to be added soon.

THEO-4025-R01: MARRIAGE IN THE 21ST CENTURY
Hinze, Christine F.  MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

Description to be added soon.


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