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Fall 2014 American Studies Courses at Rose Hill









Fall 2014 American Studies Courses at Rose Hill

AMST-4010-R01: APPROACHES TO AMERICAN STUDIES
McGee, Micki. T 2:30-5:00PM

American Studies Majors and Minors Only.
An introduction to the interdisciplinary perspectives and methods of American studies, required of all American Studies majors, and typically taken in the junior year. In this course, students will gain:
•   Knowledge about the history of American studies as an interdisciplinary movement--its major schools of thought, some of its influential figures, recent and emergent developments, and the conflicts and controversies that have animated work in the field;
•   Understanding of several of the methodologies American studies scholars use to analyze American culture;
•   Awareness of some of the major theories that influence and underpin American studies scholarship.
In the end, students will have developed the skills and knowledge necessary both for informed, rigorous reading of current publications in the field and for the production of original research of their own in future classes, including the senior thesis.
This year, the course is organized around the theme of technology. Over the course of the semester we will trace the history of American studies scholars’ engagement with technology, explore the methodological and theoretical tools they have deployed in their analyses, assess the value of various keywords they have used to interpret technology change in the United States, and accumulate an archive of primary sources—texts, sites, events, figures, and objects—that help us ask new questions about American culture.

AMST-4500-R01: THE SENIOR SEMINAR
Cassuto, Leonard & McGee, Micki. W 12:00-2:00PM

Seniors Only.
A seminar taught by two members of the American Studies faculty, this course provides a focused exploration of issues in disability/capacity studies. Reading materials will be drawn from social theory, moral philosophy, popular culture, literature and literary theory. The course work will be aimed towards facilitating the design and completion of a successful senior thesis in American Studies on topics that students have been engaged with during their previous junior seminar experience.

AFAM-3134-R01: FROM ROCK & ROLL TO HIP HOP
Naison, Mark. TF 1:00-2:15PM

A study of urban youth culture through an examination of musical forms and their evolution from the post WWII era to the present. Begins with Rock and Roll and ends with Rap and Hip Hop. [A] [C, D]

AFAM-4000-R01: AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: AMERICAN DREAM
Naison, Mark. TF 8:30-9:45AM

As we enter the 21st century, few subjects have the power to arouse more controversy and confusion among Americans than affirmative action.  What began in the middle 1960's as a moral imperative to help African-Americans overcome 300 years of exclusion from American institutions has evolved into a wide variety of practices to help disfranchised and under represented groups gain access to employment, education, and business opportunities. Although equal opportunity remains a valued goal of most Americans,  some of the methods employed by government agencies, educational institutions and businesses to achieve race and gender representation in the distribution of scarce resources have aroused great opposition.  In the last twenty years,  affirmative action programs in cities and states have been challenged by public referenda (two of which, in California and in Washington, have been successful), have been overturned by actions of a state legislature ( Governor Jeb Bush’s “One Florida Initiative) and have been the subject of hundreds of lawsuits, several of which have resulted in Supreme Court decisions. Most recently, the United States Supreme Court, responding to a court challenge to the use of race in admissions by the University of Michigan, voted to approve the affirmative action plan of the University of Michigan Law School, while rejecting the one used by University’s undergraduate college. Further court challenges to affirmative action can be expected, and the whole subject has been given new life by the election of Barack Obama, who self-identifies as Black and bi-racial, as President of the United States. Some people believe that election of a Black president has ushered in a new “post-racial era in American history;” others argue that whites are now the group most in need of protection. One thing that is certain- debates over affirmative action, and the meaning of race in America, are not going away any time soon. [H] [P]

AMCS-3333-R01: AMERICAN CATHOLIC FICTIONS
O'Donnell, Angela. MR 2:30-3:45PM
EP3 Seminar.
This course explores the narratives created by American Catholic artists and the variety of forms their stories take. Emphasis will be on 20th -Century and contemporary American Catholic novelists and short story writers, such as William Kennedy, Flannery O’Connor, Stuart Dybek, Mary Gordon, David Plante, and Andre Dubus, and we will read some contemporary poetry as well. In addition, students will engage the work of American Catholic filmmakers (such as Coppola & Scorsese), visual artists (including Warhol & Mapplethorpe), and the music & lyrics of Catholic composers/songwriters (such as Bruce Springsteen). We will consider the content of these visual, musical, and literary narratives—and the relationships among them--in light of their grounding in the specific American and Catholic cultures they engage, and we will explore the particular capability of each genre to convey the artist’s vision of the possibilities and limitations of the world he or she inhabits and (re)creates. [L,R] [C]

AMCS-3340-R01: CATHOLICISM & DEMOCRACY
Gould, William J. MR 5:30-6:45PM

EP3 Seminar.
Examines the relationship between Catholicism and democracy, placing particular stress on their relevance to contemporary American public life. In this context, Catholicism will be understood not only as a religious institution, but as the source of a tradition of communitarian social and political thought, while democracy will be understood not only as a form of government, but also as an ethos shaping American society. Authors and texts will include Alexis de Tocqueville, Orestes Brownson, Dorothy Day, John Courtney Murray, and relevant documents from Vatican II and the American hierarchy. The historic tension between Catholicism and democracy will be the subject of our conversation as will the possibilities for greater harmony between them. In particular, we will explore the possibility that Catholicism’s communitarian orientation might serve as a corrective to American individualism and consumerism, while democratic institutions and practices might have something to offer Catholicism. [R,H] [D, P]

ANTH-2700-R01: YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT: THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD
Krasinski, Kathryn E. TF 8:30-9:45AM

As the center of all significant human rituals and ceremonies, food is studied by a range of natural and social scientists. For the anthropologist, food is connected to the human body and health, social relations, identity, and even ideology; we are literally what we eat.  This course examines the role food plays in shaping cultural practices throughout the world. Students will explore changing concepts of food through time beginning with early humans, modes of food production, preparation,and consumption. Through primary literature, lectures, local ethnic markets, and sharing meals throughout the semester, this class will immerse you in the theoretical and empirical significance of the cross-cultural significance of food. Bon appétit! [H][C, D]

ARHI-2520-R01: AMERICAN ART
Heleniak, Kathryn. MR 2:30-3:45PM

This course will examine the development of American painting, sculpture and architecture from colonial times to the early 20th century, with an emphasis on painting. Major artists will be discussed in depth (Copley, West, Allston, Cole, Church, Bierstadt, Mount, Bingham, Homer, Eakins, Cassatt, O'Keeffe and others). [A] [C]

COMM-2525-R01: DIGITAL MEDIA & CYBERCULTURE
Instructor TBA. TF 1:00-2:15PM

A study of the technological, social, and cultural aspects of digital media and its emerging cyberculture and an exploration of digital media environments and digital research techniques. [A][C, P]

COMM-3108-R02: MOVIES & AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Wormser, Richard L. T 6:00-8:45PM

Lab fee.
A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature film from the early 20th century to the present. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement of the core curriculum. [A][C]

COMM-3110-R01: PEACE, JUSTICE AND THE MEDIA
Brandt, Christopher. MR 4:00-5:15PM

This course analyzes the ways in which the media represent the issues of peace and justice. Considering the relevance of peace and justice for democratic practices, the variety of media depictions of such issues will be analyzed. Topics such as environmental and economic justice, poverty and the poor, race and gender, war and peace, and media ethics and values will be covered. [A] [C, P]

COMM-3111-R01: GENDER IMAGES IN THE MEDIA
Instructor TBA. MR 4:00-5:15PM


COMM-3112-R01: MEDIA LAW
Hayes, Arthur S. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Juniors and Seniors Only.
This course is designed to introduce the communication and media studies major to the basic issues in the field of media law. Examined here are the Constitutional principles underlying the major Supreme Court cases that have established the parameters governing the use of communication technologies in the country. Special focus will be given to the various legal changes posed by new media. [A, H] [P]

COMM-3205-R01: THE JOURNALIST & THE LAW
Hayes, Arthur S. TF 2:30-3:45PM

Juniors and Seniors Only.
An investigation of the legal concerns of the working journalist: prior restraint, shield law, libel, invasion of privacy, the Freedom of Information Act. [A, H] [P]

COMM-3307-R01: SOCIAL MEDIA
Marwick, Alice E. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

An introduction to computer-mediated communication, electronic networking, online Internet communication and emerging interactive social contexts, such as MUDS, Chat, Discussion Lists and the World Wide Web. This course includes computer-based observations and hands-on projects. Computer literacy not presumed. [A][C]

COMM-3309-R01: CHILDREN AND MEDIA
Freeman, Lewis I. W 11:30AM-2:00PM

This course is designed to introduce you to the study of Children and Media. At least since Plato called for the banishment of the poets from the Republic to shield the young from ‘harmful’ ideas, adults have been wondering and worrying about the impact of mediated communication on children. In recent centuries, the emergence of new communication technologies has been consistently accompanied by calls for censorship and regulation as frightened parents worried about the impact of these new media on their children. What do we actually know about how the mass media impact the developing brain? Despite nearly a century of experimental research, methodological, ethical and philosophical challenges of studying children and media have left scholars with many questions and few clear answers. [A] [C, P]

COMM-3451-R01: FILMS OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK
Shanahan, Mark T. M 6:00-8:45PM

Rose Hill Students Only. Lab Fee.
A critical examination of Hitchcock's cinema. Students explore Hitchcock's major films, including Rear Window, Vertigo and Psycho from a variety of perspectives, including psychoanalytic, narrative and feminist theory. Emphasis on Hitchcock's role in the British and American studio system and his mastery of cinematic technique and language. [A] [C]

COMM-3505-R01: HISTORY & CULTURE OF ADVERTISING
Andersen, Robin K. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

This course will assess the impact of promotional and commercial messages on the many spheres of modern life including; the environmental, psychological, socio-cultural and political levels.  Advertising will be analyzed within the broader context of consumer culture and understood as a form of social communication. We discuss a range of topics from personal to cultural practices, from identity to branding, and from political ads to Internet promotions and beyond. Advertising messages and their visual and textual strategies of persuasion will be explored as we investigate the language of images and the dynamics between cultural icons and popular tastes. The relationship between advertising, marketing and the mass media will also be explored. The influences of marketing practices and advertising messages on the commercial media will be covered. Finding connections between contemporary research practices, focus groups and marketing designs, helps us understand the ways in which promotional strategies influence the media environment. Other topic areas such as the representations of gender, nature and the environment, as well as war-themed promotions will be given attention. [H] [D, P]

COMM-4001-R01: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE
Watchel, Edward A. M 6:00-8:45PM

Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore the ethical aspects of each film's issues,while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the students' appreciation of the films' artistic achievements. [A,R] [C]

COMM-4001-R02: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE
Instructor TBA. W 8:30-11:59AM

Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore the ethical aspects of each film's issues,while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the students' appreciation of the films' artistic achievements. [A,R] [C]

COMM-4603-R01: MEDIA & POPULAR CULTURE
Instructor TBA. W 11:30AM-1:49PM

An exploration of various forms of contemporary popular culture and their meanings in modern life. Theoretical approaches are discussed and various media texts such as film, television, advertising images, popular icons, music and style are analyzed. [A] [C]

ECON-3453-R01: LAW AND ECONOMICS
Themeli, Booi. MR 10:00-11:15AM

Prereq: ECON 1200.
This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both thegeneral economist and students planning to attend law school. [H] [P]

ECON-3453-R02: LAW AND ECONOMICS
Themeli, Booi. MR 11:30-12:45AM

Prereq: ECON 1200.
This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. [H] [P]

ECON-3850-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
Conte, Marc N. MR 2:30-3:45PM

Prereq: ECON 1100 or ECON 1200.
Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies, from reducing air and water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone depleting gases. However, the environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike. [H] [P]

ECON-4110-R01: ETHICS & ECONOMICS
Themeli, Booi. MR 2:30-3:45PM

Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution and economic sanctions. [H] [P]

ECON-4110-R02: ETHICS & ECONOMICS
Themeli, Booi. MR 4:00-5:15PM

Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution and economic sanctions. [H] [P]

ENGL-3333-R01: CAPTIVES/CANNIBALS/REBELS
Instructor TBA. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

Rose Hill Sophmores and Juniors only.
Cannibals, captives, and rebels are everywhere in early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think about why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and what they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; authors may include Mary Rowlandson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Eliza Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle. [L] [C]

ENGL-4129-R01: FOUR MODERN CATHOLIC WRITERS
Giannone, Richard. T 2:30-4:59PM

This seminar will consider the writings of Dorothy Day (1897-1980), Thomas Merton (1915-1968), Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), and Walker Percy (1916-1990). These four authors, who arguably can be termed reformers as well as artists in their own right, are the principal critics of the modern Catholic predicament before and after World War II. Each in her or his way saw a church in drastic need of rebuilding and sought to restore what had collapsed and had been left unheeded by what was essentially an immigrant institution. [L, R] [C]

ENGL-4184-R01: POSTWAR U.S. LITERATURE & CULTURE
Contreras, Daniel T. TF 1:00-2:15PM

This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility. [L][C]

ENGL-4184-R02: POSTWAR U.S. LITERATURE & CULTURE
Contreras, Daniel T. TF 2:30-3:45PM

This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility. [L][C]

HIST-4005-R01: AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY: HISTORY & ART
Swinth, Kirsten N. T 3:30-5:20PM

This course is an interdisciplinary capstone class that includes visual art, the history of art, and history.  We will practice photography, study its evolution as an art form, and explore photography’s impact on American culture.  The class is divided into four units, each focusing on a photographic type—documentary photography, nature photography, photojournalism, and family snapshots.  Within each unit, the class will focus on the relationship between photography and American culture and history. [A, H][C]

HIST-4820-R01: SEMINAR: AFRICAN ICONS
Ray, Carina E. W 11:30AM-2:00PM

This seminar introduces students to a broad range of iconic figures in Africa's recent history, while also providing them with the investigative and analytical skills associated with sound historical research and writing. We will encounter well-known historical figures, like Nelson and Winnie Mandela, while others, such as Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti and Thomas Sankara, may be unfamiliar, or infamous like Idi Amin and Robert Mugabe. We will read and critically engage a vast array of sources, including speeches, government documents, autobiographical pieces and press reports, in addition to scholarly studies. As a result of the contested and often politicized nature of these sources students will be called upon to develop their capacity for independent and critical thought, which will in turn prepare them to write effectively and persuasively. [H][D,P]

SPAN-3002-R01: LATIN AMERICA: LITERATURE & CULTURE SURVEY
Vich, Cynthia M MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

Fulfills the Global Studies requirement. Conducted in Spanish.
The study of Spanish-American society through its cultural expressions: literature, art, music, film, and print journalism. [L][C]

PHIL-4116-R01: ART, MORALITY, POLITICS
Gosetti, Jennifer A. MR 11:30-12:45PM

Art, Morality, and Politics is a seminar devoted to examining the relationship between art and moral and political values, including the political and moral suppression of art, the cultural critique of traditional aesthetic values, and the use of art and literature to express moral or political perspectives. [A, H] [C, P]

PHIL-4302-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & ETHICS
Van Buren, Edward J. TF 10:00-11:15AM

This seminar studies national and global environmental problems and policies with regard to the values or ethical questions involved in them. As such, it combines the disciplines of environmental policy (predominantly a social science field) and environmental ethics (predominantly a humanities field), both of which are by themselves interdisciplinary fields incorporating the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and applied arts and sciences. Environmental policy, often called environmental studies, is the interdisciplinary study of the creation, evolution, implementation and effectiveness of environmental policies that address national and global environmental problems such as climate change, placing particular emphasis on the use of history, anthropology, psychology, economics, sociology, and politics. Environmental ethics is the interdisciplinary study of the values or ethical dimensions of environmental problems and policies, with particular emphasis on the use of philosophy, history, literature, art and religion. Both disciplines emerged with the growing awareness of a national and global environmental crisis in the 1960s and 1970s. [R, H][P]

PHIL-4302-R02: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & ETHICS
Van Buren, Edward J. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

This seminar studies national and global environmental problems and policies with regard to the values or ethical questions involved in them. As such, it combines the disciplines of environmental policy (predominantly a social science field) and environmental ethics (predominantly a humanities field), both of which are by themselves interdisciplinary fields incorporating the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and applied arts and sciences. Environmental policy, often called environmental studies, is the interdisciplinary study of the creation, evolution, implementation and effectiveness of environmental policies that address national and global environmental problems such as climate change, placing particular emphasis on the use of history, anthropology, psychology, economics, sociology, and politics. Environmental ethics is the interdisciplinary study of the values or ethical dimensions of environmental problems and policies, with particular emphasis on the use of philosophy, history, literature, art and religion. Both disciplines emerged with the growing awareness of a national and global environmental crisis in the 1960s and 1970s. [R, H][P]

POSC-2102-R01: INTRODUCTION TO URBAN POLITICS
Hinze, Annika M. MR 2:30-3:45PM

A study of politics and power within urban political systems, including an examination of their historical development, current political economy, and prospects for the future. [H] [P]

POSC-3121-R01: NEW YORK CITY POLITICS
Berg, Bruce. MR 10:00-11:15AM

An analysis of the New York City political system. Attention will be paid to the participants in New York City government and politics, the factors that influence policy making in New York City, as well as public policies produced by that system. [H] [P]

POSC-3209-R01: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
Hume, Robert J. TF 10:00-11:15AM

A casebook analysis of central issues of constitutional law. Examines the Constitution's origins, judicial review, federalism, separation and balance of powers, domestic and foreign affairs, the commerce clause, substantive due process, the rise of the administrative state, philosophies of interpretation. Presents the Constitution as defining a structure of government, rights and political economy. Examines the Constitution's role in American political development and democracy. [H] [P]

POSC-3217-R01: THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY
Cohen, Jeffrey E. TF 1:00-2:15PM

An examination of presidential leadership, including the development, growth, and exercise of presidential power. Includes analysis of republican foundations of the presidency, organization and operation of office, role in domestic and foreign policy, relations with Congress, and the importance of character. [H] [P]

POSC-3307-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS
Fleisher, Richard. TF 2:30-3:45PM

The course will deal with understanding how and why the political process leads to the types of policy choices affecting the environment that have been made by governmental actors rather than a policy oriented course in which the substantive alternatives for public policy in the area are examined and evaluated in some detail. [H] [P]

POSC-4106-R01: SEMINAR: PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS
Panagopoulos, Costas. T 2:30-4:30PM

This course will explore the complexities of presidential elections in the United States. Attention will be devoted to the nomination and general election phases of the process. Few aspects of the American electoral process have experienced as much change as the presidential nomination process over the course of the past few decades. Developments in presidential primaries, campaign finance and nominating conventions have dramatically altered the backdrop against which presidential candidates pursue the nomination. In general election contests, presidential campaigns have honed their targeting, communications and mobilization strategies considerably. This course will examine these developments and offer students an in-depth view of the politics of contemporary presidential elections. [H] [P]

POSC-4210-R01: SEMINAR: STATE, FAMILY & SOCIETY
Berg, Bruce. M 2:30-5:15PM

Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This seminar will examine the relationship between political systems and the family by exploring the connection between varying philosophical/ideological perspectives on state intervention in the family. Public policy issues to be discussed will include marriage and divorce, adoption and foster care, child care, family and child autonomy and child and domestic abuse. [H] [P]

PYSC-3600-R01: MULTICULTURAL ISSUES
Instructor TBA. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Prereq: PSYC 1000.
As the United States becomes increasingly diverse, it is important to understand the variety of cultures that make up this diversity. This course will serve to increase students’ awareness of multicultural topics such as discrimination and prejudice. We are all members of various social groups, therefore, much of the course will be based on students’ own experiences with their own and other social groups. [H] [D]

SOCI-2701-R01: INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Sweet, Kerry R. TF 10:00-11:15AM

An overview of the criminal justice system: law, its sociology, and its social and political functions. A critical examination of law enforcement agencies, the judicial system, and corrections. [H] [P]

SOCI-2925-R01: MEDIA, CRIME, SEXUAL VIOLENCE
Sweet, Kerry R. TF 8:30-9:45AM

An analysis of mass media reporting, presentation and explanation. [A, H] [P]

SOCI-2965-R01: SCIENCE FICTION & SOCIAL CRISIS
Wormser, Richard L. W 11:30AM-2:00PM

In a dreamworld inhabited by battle weary heroes and heroines who confront alien forces, where machines find human beings disposable and wizards' spells sometimes fail, where madmen create monsters that threaten humanity, we enter a realm in which science fiction often stands as a metaphor for the human condition, resurrecting quasi-mythological perceptions that have all but vanished in our nonfictional scientific world. Through the use of selected readings, feature films and lectures, this course will examine the sociological insights that science fiction films and literature offer about how we live ourlives in the "here and now" of the post modern world. [L, A] [C]

SOCI-3136-R01: INEQUALITY-WHY/EFFECTS
Miyawaki, Michael H. MR 8:30-9:45AM

What are the causes and consequences of social inequality?  In this course, you will gain an understanding of the historical and contemporary factors that create and maintain inequality in the United States.  You will be introduced to major sociological explanations, concepts, and forms of inequality in society as well as the role of class, race, and gender in the creation and perpetuation of inequality.  You will also learn about the social consequences of inequality among different groups and how it affects their life chances. [D, P]

SOCI-3401-R01: GENDER, CRIME, JUSTICE
Flavin, Jeanne M. MR 4:00-5:15PM

This course describes, explains, and challenges the treatment of men and women victims, offenders, and workers in the criminal justice system. In the process, we will examine and critique (a) theoretical and empirical approaches to gender and crime, (b) the role of the criminal law, and (c) our responses to crime and victimization. Issues of race, class, and sexuality also will be raised. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-3405-R01: GENDER, RACE, CLASS
Kurti, Zhandarka. MR 5:30-6:45PM

The primary purpose of this course is to study how the interconnections of gender, race and class, shape the structure of our society and affect how we relate to each other and the world around us. The course begins by examining gender, race and class as sociological concepts, with the purpose of using this framework to analyze and interpret contemporary social problems in the United States. The course is divided into two parts. The first part will examine gender, race and class in a conceptual and sociological framework to provide insight of how these social categories intersect in the social structure and have produced a highly stratified and unequal society. We will focus on how these categories intersect and directly affect the lived experience of populations in the United States through an examination of various issues such as unemployment and healthcare. In the second part of the class, we will move from the local to the global and examine the impact of globalization on our society, again through the lens of gender, race, class and sexuality. This class will use a wide range of historical documents, cartoons, films and documentaries to provide further insight into how gender, race and class shape our everyday experiences. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-3601-R01: URBAN POVERTY
Rhomberg, Christopher D. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

This course deals with contemporary issues and problems in cities, with a special focus on residential segregation and urban poverty. [H] [P]

SOCI-4400-R01: GENDER, BODIES, SEXUALITY
Avishai-Bentovim, Orit. T 2:30-5:00PM

This course explores how gender shapes our lives and the world around us, including our definitions and experiences of sexuality. Rather than simple biological differences, we will examine gender and sexuality as social constructions, as social relations, as contested sets of cultural meanings, as lived experiences, and as dimensions of social structure. Course materials include theoretical writings, empirical studies, autobiographical reflections, and films. These materials will inspire us to consider the social, economic, and cultural institutions and forces that shape our lives. The study of gender and sexuality is very broad in scope, and in this course we will focus on gender as a key dimension of all social structure and institutions, with a particular interest in the intersection between gender and sexuality and the shaping of gendered and sexed bodies. My hope is that you will develop a “gender lens,” a perspective on the sources and consequences of social constructs and social inequalities that shape the modern social institutions that we inhabit, such as schools, the workplace, the state, and the family. This includes a critical evaluation of widespread assumptions about gender that we often take for granted, such as the naturalness of categories of man” and “woman,” “femininity” and “masculinity” and “heterosexual” and “homosexual.” [H] [D]

SOCI-4961-R01: URBAN ISSUES & POLICIES
Rosenbaum, Emily V. T 2:30-5:15PM

Rose Hill Seniors Only
This course examines inequality in the urban housing market, with a focus on differential access to housing/neighborhoods and the social and economic opportunities embedded in residential location.  Among the key topics are segregation (its causes and consequences), affordability, and the policies that have been implemented to resolve residential inequalities and their correlates.  All readings should be done prior to class, as class will consist of lecture and discussion. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-4971-R01: DILEMMAS OF THE MODERN SELF
McCarthy, E.D. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

Modern selfhood or identity is studied as a series of conflicts or dilemmas "What is a self today?" What are the special problems of ourselves as modern and post-modern "subjects"? [H] [P]

THEO-4600-R01: RELIGION AND PUBLIC LIFE
Welborn, Larry L. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

The course explores the role of religion in public life, focusing primarily on American democracy and its separation of church and state. The course will focus on religion's voice in public debate over issues such as health, poverty, and biomedical and economic issues, whether specifically religious arguments and language should have place in public discourse, and the role of discourse in a pluralistic society. [R, H] [P]

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