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American Studies


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Fall 2011 American Studies Courses at Lincoln Center









Fall 2011 American Studies courses at Lincoln Center

AMST 2000-L01              Major Developments in American Culture     Fisher, J             MW 11:30-12:45
An introduction to American cultural studies and a narrative cultural history of the United States, designed for students with an interest in the American Studies major but relevant for majors in other fields such as History and English. The major developments addressed may include events and problems such as the origins of American nationalism, Native American/European encounters, the institution of slavery, early social movements such as abolitionism and feminism; the "Market Revolution," the frontier and the border, imperial expansion, immigration and exclusion, new social movements since the 1960s, globalization, and the rise of the prison-industrial complex.

Tentative Book List (Subject to Change):
1) John Barry, Rising Tide: The Great Mississippi Flood of 1927 and How it Changed America 0684840024

2) F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby 0743273565
3) Rebecca Skloot, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks 1400052189
4) Carlo Rotella, Good with Their Hands: Boxers, Bluesmen, and Other Characters fromthe Rust Belt 0520243358
5) J.J. Philips, Mojo Hand: An Orphic Tale 0933944128
6) Anne Fadiman, The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down 0374525641

 

Fall 2011 courses at Lincoln Center cross listed with American Studies

AFAM 2100-L01             AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY II                    Watkins-Owens, I            T 2:30-5:15pm
A survey of African American history from the Reconstruction period to the present: the era of accommodation and the origins of the 20th-century protest; Washington-DuBois debate; migration and urbanization; the Harlem Renaissance; the civil rights movement; black power and contemporary issues. Fulfills urban studies requirement in history.
[H] [D, P]


AFAM 3634-L01      FILM AND THE AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN         TBA                        MR  4:00-5:15pm

[H] [D, P]


AFAM 3637-L01       BLACK FEMINISM: THEORY AND EXPRESSION      TBA                        MR 2:30-3:45pm
This course examines the history of black feminist/womanist thought as a political practice, a aesthetic sensibility and a scholarly methodology. Combining black feminist theory with literary and cultural works by black womenartists, the class will discuss conflicts with black feminists practice as well as the future of black feminism.
[H][D,P]

AFAM 4650-L01          SOCIAL WELFARE AND SOCIETY                   
Watkins-Owens, I            W 6:00-8:30pm
An examination of American values and attitudes about poverty, entitlement and dependency and the role of the state, individuals and society in social welfare. Presents an exploration of how experiences such as homelessness, welfare and unemployment are conceptualized in American society and how this thinking affects ourvalues over time. Fulfills senior values.
[H][P]


COMM 3108-C01         MOVIES & THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE          Kim, Nelson              T 6:00-8:45pm
A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present. Lab fee.
[A][C]

COMM 3476-L01            ETHICAL ISSUES IN THE MEDIA                           Knight, Lori                 W2:30-5:15
Review of some basic ethical principles and examination of media related issues such as freedom of expression, the right to privacy and the public's right to know.
[A][P]


COMM 4001-L01                FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE                 Auster, A                      T 2:30-5:15pm
From the clarities of the American Western to the ambiguities of film noir and the religious/philosophical intricacies of many European directors, the theme of good and evil has been a constant one in cinematic history. This course examines how the complexities of human morality are played out, puzzled over, made visually and narratively compelling by directors such as Ford, Kubrick, Reed, Welles, Scorsese, Fellini, Bergman and Rohmer. Lab fee.
[A][C]


COMM 4001-L02              FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE                 Tueth, M                      MW 1:00-2:15pm

From the clarities of the American Western to the ambiguities of film noir and the religious/philosophical intricacies of many European directors, the theme of good and evil has been a constant one in cinematic history. This course examines how the complexities of human morality are played out, puzzled over, made visually and narratively compelling by directors such as Ford, Kubrick, Reed, Welles, Scorsese, Fellini, Bergman and Rohmer. Lab fee.
[A] [C]

    

COLI 3215-L01               THE WAR NOVEL                                        Harris, F.              TF 11:30-12:45

This course focuses on how the 20th-century war novel translates the experience of war into fiction (World War I and II, and the Vietnam War). Readings may include Hemingway, Remarque, Céline, Claude Simon, Tim O'Brien.
 
[L][C]

ECON 3453-L01               LAW AND ECONOMICS                   Buckley                        
MR 2:30-3:45pm
The extensive overlaps between the disciplines of law and economics are increasingly recognized by both fields. Most American law schools include the economic analysis of law in most substantive course areas. This course will examine how economic analysis, especially the focus on the measurement of costs and benefits, and on legal penalties as the "price" of bad behavior whose purpose is in part to efficiently discourage such behavior. We will also use economic ideas of opportunity costs, transaction and information costs, and efficiency to illuminate issues of law and regulation. In addition, we will see how legal frameworks of property and contract rights are recognized by economists as fundamental to the functioning of the economy. We will look at topics in property and contract law, and also at the legal process of litigation and tort liability. We may also look at criminal law from an economic viewpoint. This course should be useful to students who plan on careers in business or government where the legal framework is a critical part of the economic environment. The course will also be useful to students planning on law school, where the concepts covered here are increasingly integrated into law school curricula. Knowledge of basic microeconomic analysis principles will be important to the course, but the prerequisite can be waived for non-econ majors if they are willing to do some extra work early on.
[H] [P]


ENGL 3629-C01         20TH C. AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE      TBA          R 6:00-8:45pm
A study of central African American writers in their cultural and historical contexts.
[L] [C,D]


HIST 3863-L01         CATHOLICS & JEWS IN NYC                        Soyer, D          MW 1:00-2:15pm
[H, R][D, P]

HIST 3990-L01     NORTH AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY    Stoll, Steven  MR 1:00-2:15pm

The course will explore various aspects of North American Environmental History. 
[
H] [P]


MUSC 2031-L01    ROCK & POP MUSIC SINCE WWII                Gelbart, M              T2:30-5:15pm
Rock and pop music have played key roles in Western culture for over half a century. This couse considers the roots and musical features of rock and related styles, their changing status within "mainstream" culture, and the musical and ethical issues they raise. From the R&B music of the early 1950's to the British Invasion, punk, disco, rap, alternative and the spread of electronica, pop musicians have moved billions of people, while raising questions about race, gender, generation gaps, commercialism, and globalization.
[A][C]

POSC 2250-L01               THE US CONGRESS                           Greer, C                          TF 8:30-9:45am 
A study of the historical development and current operations of the U.S. Congress. Particular attention will be paid to the impact of elections, formal and informal rules and procedures, political parties and committees on the policies produced by Congress and/or the relations between the Congress and the executive branch.
[H] [P]

SOCI 2701-R01           INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE         Block, S        TF 2:30-3:45pm
An overview of the criminal justice system: law, its sociology, and its social and political functions. A critical examination of law enforcement agencies, the judicial system, and corrections.
[H] [P]


SPAN 2640-L01       SERVICE LEARNING: SPANISH & NEW YORK CITY Kasten, C   TF 2:30-3:45pm

This course works to achieve greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking world. We will examine the Latin Americans and Latino experience in NYC through a variety of written and visual texts. Students will work in community to improve their language skills and cultural understanding in a highly contextualized environment. Community service required.
[H, L][D]

 

 
 

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