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Fall 2012 American Studies Courses at Lincoln Center










AFAM COMM ECON ENGL HIST POSC SOCI THEO

Fall 2012 American Studies courses at Lincoln Center

AMST-2000-L01: MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS IN AMERICAN CULTURE (PLURALISM)
Fisher, James T.
MW 11:30AM - 12:45PM
An introduction to American cultural studies and a narrative cultural history of the United States, designed for students with an interest in the American Studies major but relevant for majors in other fields such as History and English. The major developments addressed may include events and problems such as the origins of American nationalism, Native American/European encounters, the institution of slavery, early social movements such as abolitionism and feminism; the "Market Revolution," the frontier and the border, imperial expansion, immigration and exclusion, new social movements since the 1960s, globalization, and the rise of the prison-industrial complex.


Fall 2012 courses at Lincoln Center cross listed with American Studies

AFAM-3637-L01: BLACK FEMINISM: THEORY & EXPRESSION      
Cox, Aimee
M 6:00PM - 8:45PM
This course examines the history of black feminist/womanist thought as a political practice, a aesthetic sensibility and a scholarly methodology. Combining black feminist theory with literary and cultural works by black womenartists, the class will discuss conflicts with black feminists practice as well as the future of black feminism. [L] [C, D]

AFAM-3667-L01: CARIBBEAN LITERATURE
Mustafa, Fawzia
T 2:30PM - 5:15PM
Courses functions as both AFAM and COLI.
Comparative analysis of works from the English-, French- and Spanish-speaking Caribbean written in and about exile, migration and diaspora. The experience of exile, migration and diaspora in the formation of national and anti-nationalist discourses. Emphasis on colonial and post-colonial cultural theory. [L] [C, D]

COMM-3108-L01: MOVIES AND THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE       
Auster, Albert
T 6:00PM - 8:45PM  
Lab Fee.
A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present.
[C]

COMM-3332-L01: UNDERSTANDING TELEVISION
Clark, Jennifer S.
TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM
Credit will not be given for both this course and CM 3105.
Critical Analysis of television as a storytelling medium. Study of current approaches to television narrative and style. Screenings and discussion of TV series and news programming. [A] [P]

COMM-3401-L01: HOLLYWOOD GENRES
Kim, Nelson
W 2:30PM - 5:15PM
Lab fee. Credit will not be given for both this course and CM 3491.
Cultural, psychological, socioeconomic analyses of theme, plot, characterization, and iconography of popular formula films. [A] [C]

COMM-3482-L01: FILM AND GENDER
Clark, Jennifer S.
TF 2:30PM - 3:45PM
This course explores the interrelated nature of gender and film in aesthetics, production, marketing, and reception. To do so, the course focuses on film theory and criticism about representations of femininity and masculinity, which include attendant issues of sexuality, embodiment, race, class and nationality. This approach will be augmented by considerations of historical and cultural contexts, developments within film industries, key figures in film production, and audiences. Films will include mainstream commercial films and filmmakers as well as feminist, avant-garde, and counter-cinemas. [A] [C]

COMM-4001-L01: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE (SENIOR VALUES)
Auster, Albert
T 2:30PM - 5:15PM
Lab Fee.
The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. [A] [C]

COMM-4001-L02: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE (SENIOR VALUES)
Tueth, Michael
TF 11:30AM - 12:45PM
Lab Fee.
The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. [A] [C]

COMM-4601-L01: TELEVISION AND SOCIETY
Dunks, Robert W.
T 2:30PM - 5:15PM
A problem-based and issue-oriented analysis of the medium as it affects basic social institutions and values. Our secondary goal this semester will be to develop our powers of argumentation through verbal practice in class and through writing practice in the form of essay exam answers and a research paper. Importantly for your development as a critical thinker, the readings, visual texts and class discussions will not provide all of the “answers” to our questions in this class. You will expand on and complicate the notions we discuss to come to your own coherent readings of our texts. [C]

ECON-3453-L01: LAW & ECONOMICS
Buckley, Michael D.
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM
This course is cross-listed for American Studies and Prelaw. No prereq, but Econ 1200 recommended.
The extensive overlaps between the disciplines of law and economics are increasingly recognized by both fields. Most American law schools include the economic analysis of law in most substantive course areas. This course will examine how economic analysis, especially the focus on the measurement of costs and benefits, and on legal penalties as the “price” of bad behavior whose purpose is in part to efficiently discourage such behavior. We will also use economic ideas of opportunity costs, transaction and information costs, and efficiency to illuminate issues of law and regulation. In addition, we will see how legal frameworks of property and contract rights are recognized by economists as fundamental to the functioning of the economy. We will look at topics in property and contract law, and also at the legal process of litigation and tort liability. We may also look at criminal law from an economic viewpoint. This course should be useful to students who plan on careers in business or government where the legal framework is a critical part of the economic environment. The course will also be useful to students planning on law school, where the concepts covered here are increasingly integrated into law school curricula. Knowledge of basic microeconomic analysis principles will be important in the course, but the prerequisite can be waived for non-econ majors if they are willing to do some extra work early on. [H] [P]

ECON-3580-L01: ECONOMICS OF DIVERSITY
Barry, Janis
TF 11:30AM - 12:45PM
Manyof the social interaction of an individual in American society are shaped by the ethnic, racial, and gender groups to which the individual belongs. In this course we will investigate several of the economic effects of social interactions in a diverse society including: residential segregation, peer effects on neighborhood crime rates, inter-racial marriage patterns, diverse, social norms and cultural beliefs, the spread of diseases, income inequality, and affirmative action. While the specific topics covered are broad, many share properties that can be understood through the concepts of basic network theory.
[H] [D, P]

ENGL-3058-L01 WRITING AUTOBIOGRAPHY
Stone, Elizabeth E.
TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM
An advanced writing course that develops students' skills in first-person narrative. [L] [C]

ENGL-3617-L01: AMERICAN SHORT STORY
Tanksley, William R.
TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM
Covers the development of the short story in America as it evolved through classicism, romanticism, realism, naturalism, and existentialism; with emphasis on recurring cultural issues: images of women, the Puritan heritage, the American Dream, American materialism, and others. [L] [C]

ENGL-3841-L01: CONTEMPORARY FICTION
Tanksley, William R.
TF 2:30PM - 3:45PM
What makes comtemporary fiction "contemporary"? How does it differ from pre-World War II fiction or so-called "modernist" writing? This course explores the fundamental transformation of the way contemporaries see the world, dealing with writers as diverse as Kundera, Nabokov, Philip Roth, Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, Joan Didion, Marquez, Mishma, Robbe-Grillet, Patrick Suskind, Calvino and Vonnegut. [L] [C]

HIST-3657-L01: AMERICAN CONSTITUTION
Krukofsky, Howard
MW 1:00PM - 2:15PM
Role of constitutionalism in the development of American society. The concept of a higher law, federal-state controversies, economic growth, and the expansion of personal rights will be considered in the context of the American constitution. [H] [P]

HIST-3753-L01: CIVIL WAR ERA, 1861-1877        
Goldberg, Barry
T 6:00PM - 8:45PM
A history of the war years and America's racial and sectional readjustment after the war. [H] [P]

HIST-4953-L01: THE US CIVILIZING EFFORT IN LATIN AMERICA
Lindo-Fuentes, Hector
TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM
Students in this undergraduate seminar will do research in primary sources to analyze different aspects of the US "civilizing mission" in Latin America. The course will concentrate in the period from 1898 to the eve of the Great Depression. We will discuss the efforts of diplomats, missionaries, business people, educators and the like to “civilize” Latin Americans, and the reaction of Latin Americans to such efforts.  [H] [D, P]

POSC-3209-L01: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW   
Greenberg-Chao, Laura
T 6:00PM - 8:45PM
A casebook analysis of central issues of constitutional law. Examines the Constitution's origins, judicial review, federalism, separation and balance of powers, domestic and foreign affairs, the commerce clause, substantive due process, the rise of the administrative state, philosophies of interpretation. Presents the Constitution as defining a structure of government, rights and political economy. Examines the Constitution's role in American political development and democracy. [H] [P]

POSC-3228-L01: CIVIL RIGHTS
Deluca Jr., Thomas S.
MW 1:00PM - 2:15PM
A casebook analysis of legal responses to public and private discrimination, with emphasis on race and gender. Examines Supreme Court decisions, laws, and politics, involving the 5th, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th amendments, equal protection and level of scrutiny, civil and voting rights, public accommodations, employment, private associations, schools, privacy, "natural" roles, the public/private dichotomy. Studies movements for equality. Evaluates busing, affirmative action, pay equity and other remedies. [H] [P]

SOCI-2960-L01: POPULAR CULTURE
Nerio, Ronald J.
MW 11:30AM - 12:45PM
This course will investigate the nature of contemporary popular culture. How do people spend their "spare time"? Does this vary with social class? Is sport the new religion? And how does this differ from that of earlier periods and simpler societies? [A, H] [C]

SOCI-3300-L01: "RACE" AND "MIXED RACE"
Nerio, Ronald J.
MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM
The origins of "race," its historic role and social construction are examined. Ancient and modern day ideas are explored. Contrasts between the United States and Latin American conceptions of "race" and "mixed race" are analyzed. Future implications are discussed. [H] [D, P]

THEO-3876-L01: MUSLIMS IN AMERICA
Kueny, Kathryn M.
MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM
This course will examine the history and experience of Muslims in the United States from the time of the slave trade to the present day. Through a close analysis of both primary and secondary materials such as histories, religious texts, ethnographies, biographies, fictional tales, news articles, web blogs, music and films, students will explore the rich diversity of US Muslim communities as well as their multi-faceted contributions to the global Muslim umma and to the formation of an “American Islam.” Particular emphasis will be given to the impact of 9/11 and the “war on terror” on both the representations, challenges, and experiences of Muslims in America. [H] [D, P]

THEO-4600-L01: RELIGION AND PUBLIC LIFE
Steinfels, Peter F.
MW 1:00PM - 2:15PM
The course explores the role of religion in public life, focusing primarily on American democracy and its separation of church and state. The course will focus on religion's voice in public debate over issues such as health, poverty, andbiomedical and economic issues, whether specifically religious arguments and language should have place in public discourse, and the role of discourse in a pluralistic society. [R, H] [P]

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