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American Studies


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Fall 2012 American Studies Courses at Rose Hill










AFAM AMCS ARHI COMM ECON ENGL HIST PHIL POSC PSYC SOCI THEO

Fall 2012 American Studies courses at Rose Hill

AMST-2800-R01: AMERICAN LEGAL REASONING        
Hayes, Arthur S.
TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM      
This course has two objectives: (I) To introduce students to the basics of legal reasoning by using Socratic dialogue, case analysis, research, and writing. (II) To give students a basic understanding of the history and operations of the U.S. Supreme Court and its impact on the American judicial and political systems, culture and economy. [H] [P]

AMST-3010-R01: APPROACHES TO AMERICAN  STUDIES (Interdisciplinary Capstone Core)
Hendler, Glenn S.
M 2:30PM - 4:59PM               
American Studies Majors and Minors Only.
An introduction to the interdisciplinary perspectives and methods of American studies, required of all American Studies majors and minors, and typically taken in the junior year. In this course, students will gain:
  • Knowledge about the history of American studies as an interdisciplinary movement--its major schools of thought, some of its influential figures, recent and emergent developments, and the conflicts and controversies that have animated work in the field;
  • Understanding of several of the methodologies American studies scholars use to analyze American culture;
  • Awareness of some of the major theories that influence and underpin American studies scholarship.
In the end, students will have developed the skills and knowledge necessary both for informed, rigorous reading of current publications in the field and for the production of original research of their own in future classes, including (for majors) the senior thesis.
This year, the course is organized around a theme that was the subject of the September 2011 issue of American Quarterly: sound. Sound studies is a new rubric within American studies, but the field has long been interested in studying the sensory experiences of everyday life, music popular and otherwise, and technologies that produce and reporduce sound. Over the course of the semester we will trace the history of American studies scholars’ engagement with sound, explore the methodological and theoretical tools they have deployed in their analyses, assess the value of various keywords they have used to interpret sound in the United States, and accumulate an archive of primary sources—texts, sites, events, figures, and objects—that help us ask new questions about American culture.


AMST-3500-R01: THE SENIOR SEMINAR        
Farland, Maria & Stoll, Steven
R 2:30PM - 4:29PM
Seniors Only.
A seminar taught by two members of the American Studies faculty, this course provides focused exploration of the country and city in American history and culture as the basis of the senior essay. Students will consider the cultural depiction of city and country in literature and painting, the political economy of urban expansion and industrial agriculture, as well as the social history of labor movements that combined factory workers and farmers. Authors might include Raymond Williams, Leo Marx, Karl Marx, Robert Frost, the Twelve Southerners who wrote I’ll Take My Stand, James C. Scott, William Cronon, and others. The course work will be aimed towards facilitating the design and completion of a successful senior thesis in American Studies.

Fall 2012 courses at Rose Hill cross listed with American Studies

AFAM-3037-R01: BEING AND BECOMING BLACK (Advanced Social Science Core/Globalism)
LaBennett, Oneka
MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM        
Fulfills Global Studies Requirement.
This course is about being Black throughout the Atlantic world.  What constitutes Blackness?  What experiences, cultural understandings and social problems shape the identities of people of African descent?  In order to address these questions, the course focuses on the people who were relocated by the Atlantic slave trade to the Caribbean, South and Central America, and the United States, and on their subsequent migrations.  We will explore the disparate cultural, national, historical and intellectual contexts in which Black identities are constructed, revealing both commonalities and differences.  Paying specific attention to how racial identity is shaped by social context, the course will interrogate theories of Black identity formation and notions of Black nationhood, and will examine different perspectives on Diaspora theory. Questions addressed will also include: How can we characterize the role of slaveryand colonialism in defining Black identity? Is “diaspora” a useful concept for understanding Blackness? How can we theorize on the notion of “identity” and on the social construction of race for such a diverse and wide spread group of people? Where do Black women fit into theories surrounding Black identity formation, politics and nationhood? Topics examined will also include: gender, migration and transnationalism, authenticity and Black identity formation vis-à-vis popular culture, contradictions associated with blanqueamiento, and hair as a site for female body politics.  While readings are interdisciplinary in approach, our understandings of Blacks in the Atlantic world will be informed by ethnographic, historical and literary texts covering many cultural contexts including the U.S., England, Kenya, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Brazil, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic. Students are urged to choose research topics early in the term from a variety of subjects including music, fashion, religion, literature, politics, sports, etc. [H] [D, P]

AFAM-3112-R01: THE SIXTIES: (Pluralism / Advanced History Core)
Naison, Mark
TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM             
An examination of the political, cultural and economic changes that took place in the United States during the 1960s. Special attention will be given to the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War in shaping public discourse and in presenting Americans with important political and moral choices. [A, H] [C, D]

AFAM-3132-R01: BLACK PRISON EXPERIENCE: (Pluralism/ Advanced Social Science Core)
Chapman, Mark L.
T 2:30PM - 4:59PM        
This course examines the historical and contemporary experience of African Americans in the prison system with a special emphasis on the role of religion as a transforming agent. Students will survey the writings of current and former prisoners and ask what role, if any, spirituality played in their experience of incarceration.  [H] [D, P]

AFAM-3146-R01: CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN IMMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES: (Globalism/Advanced Social Science Core)        
Edward, Jane K.
TF 11:30AM - 12:45PM
This course explores the experiences of contemporary African immigrants in the United States with particular focus on immigrant experiences from Sub-Saharan African. The course is designed to introduce students to contemporary literature, theoretical and methodological issues concerning the study of African immigration and the history of recent African immigration to the United States.  It will explore migratory processes of Africans both within the continent and across international borders. Through lectures based on selected readings, class discussions, and educational audiovisual materials, the course will discuss the following topics: reasons for migration, or what motivated many Africans to migrate to the United States; migration and settlement patterns in the host society; adjustment to life in America; the formation of national and transnational identities in the context of race and ethnic relations within the American society; changes in gendered and generational roles and relations; and the socio-cultural, economic, political, and intellectual contributions of African immigrants to the host societies as well as their linkages with their communities in Africa. [H] [D, P]

AFAM-4000-R01: AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: AMERICAN  DREAM (Senior Values )
Naison, Mark
TF 8:30AM - 9:45AM        
As we enter the 21st century, few subjects have the power to arouse more controversy and confusion among Americans than affirmative action.  What began in the middle 1960's as a moral imperative to help African-Americans overcome 300 years of exclusion from American institutions has evolved into a wide variety of practices to help disfranchised and under represented groups gain access to employment, education, and business opportunities. Although equal opportunity remains a valued goal of most Americans,  some of the methods employed by government agencies, educational institutions and businesses to achieve race and gender representation in the distribution of scarce resources have aroused great opposition.  In the last twenty years,  affirmative action programs in cities and states have been challenged by public referenda (two of which, in California and in Washington, have been successful), have been overturned by actions of a state legislature ( Governor Jeb Bush’s “One Florida Initiative) and have been the subject of hundreds of lawsuits, several of which have resulted in Supreme Court decisions. Most recently, the United States Supreme Court, responding to a court challenge to the use of race in admissions by the University of Michigan, voted to approve the affirmative action plan of the University of Michigan Law School, while rejecting the one used by University’s undergraduate college. Further court challenges to affirmative action can be expected, and the whole subject has been given new life by the election of Barack Obama, who self-identifies as Black and bi-racial, as President of the United States. Some people believe that election of a Black president has ushered in a new “post-racial era in American history;” others argue that whites are now the group most in need of protection. One thing that is certain- debates over affirmative action, and the meaning of race in America, are not going away any time soon. [H] [P]

AMCS-3333-R01: AMERICAN CATHOLIC FICTIONS (Advanced Literature Core)        
O'Donnell, Angela G.
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM               
This course explores the narratives created by American Catholic artists and the variety of forms their stories take.  Emphasis will be on 20th-Century and contemporary American Catholic novelists and short story writers, such as William Kennedy, Flannery O’Connor, Ron Hansen, Mary Gordon, David Plante, and Andre Dubus, and we will read some contemporary poetry as well.  In addition, students will engage the work of American Catholic filmmakers (suchas Francis Ford Coppola), visual artists (including Andy Warhol), and the music & lyrics of Catholic composers/songwriters (such as Bruce Springsteen).  We will consider the content of these visual, musical, and literary narratives—and the relationships among them--in light of their grounding in the specific American and Catholic cultures they portray, and we will explore the particular capability of each genre to convey the artist’s vision of the possibilities and limitations of the world he or she inhabits and (re)creates. [L, R][C]

AMCS-3340-R01: CATHOLICISM & DEMOCRACY: (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Gould, William J.
MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM        
This course will examine the relationship between Catholicism and democracy, placing particular stress on their relevance to contemporary American public life. In this context, Catholicism will be understood not only as a religious institution, but as the source of a tradition of communitarian social and political thought, while democracy will be understood not only as a form of government, but also as an ethos shaping American society. Authors and texts will include Alexis de Tocqueville, Orestes Brownson, Dorothy Day, John Courtney Murray, and relevant documents from Vatican II and the American hierarchy. The historic tension between Catholicism and democracy will be the subject of our conversation as will the possibilities for greater harmony between them. In particular, we will explore the possibility that Catholicism's communitarian orientation might serve as a corrective to American individualism and consumerism, while democratic institutions and practices might have something to offer Catholicism. [H, R] [P]

ARHI-2250-R01: PRE-COLUMBIAN ART: (Globalism)        
Mundy, Barbara
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM
Seniors Only.
Introduction to the art of Mexico, Central America and Peru from its beginnings to the time of its contact with Europe. Examination of architecture, sculpture, ceramics, and paintings in the context of such cultures as Olmec, Teotihuacan, Maya, Aztec, Chavin, Mochica, Tiahuanaco and Inca. [A] [C]

COMM-3108-R01: MOVIES AND THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (Pluralism)        
Ribalow, Meir
T 2:30PM - 5:15PM     
Lab Fee.
A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present. [C]

COMM-3108-R02: MOVIES AND THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (Pluralism)        
Ribalow, Meir
T 6:00PM - 8:30PM
Lab Fee.
A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present. [C]

COMM-3110-R01: PEACE, JUSTICE AND THE MEDIA        
Brandt, Christopher
TF 2:30PM - 3:45PM        
This course analyzes the ways in which the media represent the issues of peace and justice. Considering the relevance of peace and justice for democratic practices, the variety of media depictions of such issues will be analyzed. Topics such as environmental and economic justice, poverty and the poor, race and gender, war and peace, and media ethics and values will be covered. [A] [C, P]

COMM-3111-R01: GENDER IMAGES IN MEDIA        
TBA
MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM
We will add the description for this course when the instructor makes it available to us. [A] [C]

COMM-3112-R01: MEDIA LAW (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Hayes, Arthur S.
TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM
Juniors and Seniors Only.
This course is designed to introduce the communication and media studies major to the basic issues in the field of media law. Examined here are the Constitutional principles underlying the major Supreme Court cases that have established the parameters governing the use of communication technologies in the country. Special focus will be given to the various legal changes posed by new media. Juniors and Seniors only. [A, H] [P]

COMM-3205-R01: THE JOURNALIST & THE LAW (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Delio, Suzanne C.
W 6:30PM - 9:00PM        
Juniors and Seniors Only.
An investigation of the legal concerns of the working journalist: prior restraint, shield law, libel, invasion of privacy, the Freedom of Information Act. [A, H] [P]

COMM-3307-R01: SOCIAL MEDIA        
Marwick, Alice E.
TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM              
Not Open to Freshmen.
An introduction to computer-mediated communication, electronic networking, online Internet communication and emerging interactive social contexts, such as MUDS, Chat, Discussion Lists and the World Wide Web. This course includes computer-based observations and hands-on projects. Computer literacy not presumed. [A] [C]

COMM-3309-R01: CHILDREN AND MEDIA        
Freeman, Lewis I.
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM
Juniors and Seniors Only. Prereq: COMM 1010 & 1011 COMM majors or permission of instructor.
This course explores the controversy surrounding children's media. Topics such as the role of media in socialization and learning, the effects of media content and communication technologies on children's behavior, thought and emotions are examined. The functions that media perform for children, and the efforts to design media specifically for children are considered. Various forms such as television, popular music, film, video games, fairy tales and children's literature are explored. [H] [P]

COMM-3403-R01: AMERICAN FILM COMEDY        
Tueth, Michael
W 11:30AM - 2:00PM
Lab Fee.
The course takes both a theoretical and historical approach to Hollywood film comedy from thesilent classics of Sennett, Chaplin, and Keaton to the best of contemporary work in the genre. [A] [C]

COMM-3451-R01: FILMS OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK        
Shanahan, Mark T.
M 6:00PM - 8:30PM        
Rose Hill Students Only. Lab Fee.
A critical examination of Hitchcock's cinema. Students explore Hitchcock's major films, including Rear Window, Vertigo and Psycho from a variety of perspectives, including psychoanalytic, narrative and feminist theory. Emphasis on Hitchcock's role in the British and American studio systeand his mastery of cinematic technique and language. [A] [C]

COMM-3476-R01: ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDIA        
Sternberg, Janet
T 6:00PM - 8:30PM        
Juniors and Seniors Only.
What do newspaper and magazine editors, public relations officers in universities and corporations, advertising executives, entertainment moguls, search engine operators, and broadcast news directors have in common? Media professionals like these face challenging moral dilemmas on a daily basis. Issues such as honesty, privacy, confidentiality, conflicts of interest, and offensive content, among others, require those who work in media industries to make ethical decisions that balance individual considerations with institutional pressures. This course provides students with tools for making more knowledgeable and principled judgments about the ethics of media. Using a moral reasoning method based on philosophy, media practice, and critical thinking, we will work together to encourage each other’s problem-solving skills, to heighten our sensitivity to ethical issues, and to develop our ability to examine different points of view in a systematic manner. [A] [C, P]

COMM-3505-R01: HISTORY & CULTURE OF ADVERTISING
Andersen, Robin K.
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM
This course will assess the impact of promotional and commercial messages on the many spheres of modern life including; the environmental, psychological, socio-cultural and political levels.  Advertising will be analyzed within the broader context of consumer culture and understood as a form of social communication. We discuss a range of topics from personal to cultural practices, from identity to branding, and from political ads to Internet promotions and beyond. Advertising messages and their visual and textual strategies of persuasion will be explored as we investigate the language of images and the dynamics between cultural icons and popular tastes. The relationship between advertising, marketing and the mass media will also be explored. The influences of marketing practices and advertising messages on the commercial media will be covered. Finding connections between contemporary research practices, focus groups and marketing designs, helps us understand the ways in which promotional strategies influence the media environment. Other topic areas such as the representations of gender, nature and the environment, as well as war-themed promotions will be given attention. [D, P]

COMM-3681-R01: MEDIA AND NATIONAL IDENTITY (Advanced Social Science Core/Globalism)
TBA
T 2:30PM - 5:15PM
An examination of case studies showing how national identity is inferred and organized by mass media. Questions include: How is nationalism produced by media discourse? How are outsiders portrayed? Who draws the boundaries between inside and outside, and how? Texts will include television, radio, print journalism, music and films. [C]

COMM-4402-R01: VALUES IN THE NEWS ( Value Seminar / Eloquentia Perfecta 4 )
Capo, James A.
TF 11:30AM - 12:45PM
An examination of how news constructs and mediates personal and social values. This course considers how news frames discourse about reality, and then analyzes the framing of specific values, ethical issues and moral behaviors. [H] [C, P]

COMM-4005-R01: DIGITAL MEDIA AND PUBLIC RESPONSIBILITY (Senior Values)        
Capo, James A. TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM
Fordham Rose Hill Seniors Only.
An examination of the choices and responsibilities which shape personal identity and common humanity for those who regularly employ the tools of digital media and computer technology. Regular use of digital media enables individuals to separate from their physical selves and from the community spaces in which they have traditionally lived. This course focuses on the resulting ethical tensions. [H] [P]

COMM-4603-R01: MEDIA & POPULAR CULTURE        
TBA
TF 10:00AM - 11:15 AM        
An exploration of various forms of contemporary popular culture and their meanings in modern life. Theoretical approaches are discussed and various media texts such as film, television, advertising images, popular icons, music and style are analyzed. [A] [C]

ECON-3453-R01: LAW AND ECONOMICS (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Themeli, Booi
MR 10:00AM - 11:15AM      
Prereq: ECON 1200.
This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. [H] [P]

ECON-3453-R02: LAW AND ECONOMICS (Advanced Social Science Core)  
Themeli, Booi
MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM
Prereq: ECON 1200.
This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. [H] [P]

ECON-3850-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (Advanced Social Science Core)        
McLeod, Darryl L.
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM        
Prereq: ECON 1100 or ECON 1200.
Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies, from reducing air and water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone depleting gases. However, the environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike. [H] [P]

ECON-3850-R02: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS : (Advanced Social Science Core)        
McLeod, Darryl L.
MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM        
Prereq: ECON 1100 or ECON 1200.
Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies, from reducing air and water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone depleting gases. However, the environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike. [H] [P]

ECON-4110-R01: ETHICS & ECONOMICS (Senior Values)        
Themeli, Booi
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM               
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution and economic sanctions.  [H] [P]

ECON-4110-R02: ETHICS & ECONOMICS (Senior Values)
Tueth, Michael S
MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM        
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution and economic sanctions.  [H] [P]

ENGL-3069-R01: WRITING THE CITY        
Caldwell, Mark
W 11:30AM - 1:59PM        
Creative Writing.
In this class we'll be reading (and writing) fiction, literary non-fiction, and poetry about urban life. Readings will center on three cities: New York, Paris, and Cairo. [L] [C]

ENGL-3356-R01: INTRO TO ASIAN AMERICA STUDIES: (Advanced Literature Core)        
Kim, James
TF 2:30PM - 3:45PM        
An introduction to key issues in Asian American Studies, viewed through a transnational frame of reference. Topics will most likely include patterns of Asian migration to the US, exclusion laws, Japanese American internment, model minority discourse, and Asians and Asian Americans in film and media. [L] [C, D]

ENGL-3438-R01: AMERICAN MODERNISM: (Advanced Literature Core)        
TBA
TF 2:30PM - 3:45PM
This course introduces forms of literary experimentation associated with the modernist movement, including authors such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Gertrude Stein, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer and others. We’ll examine such contexts as Harlem Renaissance, American writers in Paris, southern agrarianism, and others, as a way of grasping modernism’s fascination with difficulty. [L] [C]

ENGL-3467-R01: DISOBEDIENCE IN LITERATURE: (Advanced Literature Core)        
Caldwell, Mark
R 2:30PM - 4:29PM        
"Of man's first disobedience" -- so begins John Milton's epic poem, PARADISE LOST. Milton was not alone in his having interest sparked: the concept of disobedience, in its various permutations (literary, social, political, psychological, religious) has energized a wide variety of literary works. One might say that without some form of disobedience there could be no storytelling. Some of the questions that will shape our explorations in this course include: when is disobedience herioc, and when is it destructive or regrettable? What is the difference between disobeying your family and disobeying the law? Can an obedient character be interesting? How are the different modes of authority (religious, juridical, familial, played off against one another in order to license behavior? Using disobedience as our master rubric, we will follow important continuities and innovative changes in literary history across the past three centuries. [L] [C]

ENGL-3584-R01: EARLY CARIBBEAN LITERATURE: (Advanced Literature Core)        
Kim, Julie C.
MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM        
Since 1942 Europeans have alternated between imagining the Caribbean as a tropical paradise or as a land of dangerous savagery. This course will examine British writing about the Caribbean from the sixteenth through early nineteenth century in order to understand the ways in which authors thought about and represented cultural and ethnic difference, colonialism, slavery, and other issues related to imperial expansion. It will also look at some of the earliest works produced by authors who lived in the Caribbean and participated in the emergence of new Caribbean literary forms. [L] [C, D]

ENGL-3653-R01: MAJOR AMERICAN AUTHORS: (Advance Literature Core)        
TBA
TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM
This course provides an introduction to major American authors. [L] [C]

ENGL-3662-R01: POSTWAR 1945 U.S. LITERATURE & CULTURE: (Advanced Literature Core)        
Collins, Cornelius
MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM
This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility. [L][C]

ENGL-3930-R01: INTRODUCTION TO GAY & LESBIAN LIT        
Cahill, Edward C.
MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM
This course will examine texts by a diverse range of 20th C. American and British authors, including Radclyffe Hall, James Baldwin, Patricia Highsmith, Paul Monette, Audre Lorde, and Tony Kushner. Readings, lectures, and discussions will emphasize the literary and cultural history of same-sex identity and desire, heteronormativity and oppression, and queer civil protest. It will also consider the problems of defining a queer literary canon, introduce the principles of queer theory, and explore the discursive boundaries between the political and the personal. [L] [C, D]

ENGL-4121-R01: NEW YORK CITY IN FICTION (Advanced Literature Core)        
TBA
TR 5:30PM - 6:45PM        
FCRH Seniors Only.
This course will explore both short stories and novels written in and about New York City during the 20th century. [L] [C]

ENGL-4129-R01: 4 MODERN CATHOLIC WRITERS (Senior Values)        
TBA
T 2:30PM - 4:59PM
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This seminar will consider the writings of Dorothy Day (1897-1980), Thomas Merton (1915-1968), Flannery O'Connor (1925-1964), and Walker Percy (1916-1990). These four authors, who arguably can be termed reformers as wel as artists in their own right, are the principal critics of the modern Catholic predicament before and after World War II. Each in her or his way saw a church in drastic need of rebuilding and sought to restore what had collapsed and had been left unheeded by what was essentially an immigrant institution. [L, R] [C]

HIST-3633-R01: THE COLD WAR SPACE RACE: (Advanced History Core)        
Siddiqi, Asif A.
MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM
Prereq: PSYC 1000.
In this course, we will consider the entire history of space exploration with a particular focus on the Cold War era. The course will begin with the first dreaming about space travel during the 16th century and end with the rise of new space powers such as China and India. Using a combination of primary and secondary sources, we will consider the political, military, technological, social, and cultural dimensions of space exploration. Among many issues, we will engage in speculations on why humans were drawn to the cosmos in the first place, discuss the weaponization of space, examine the geopolitical rationales for space travel, explore the popular culture of Star Trek and Star Wars, deconstruct the myth of the hero astronaut, uncover the secret Soviet space program, revisit the extraordinary Apollo missions to the Moon, and evaluate the International Space Station of the 21st century. [H] [P]

HIST-3653-R01: GENDER IN EARLY AMERICA: (Advanced History Core)        
Crane, Elaine
MR 10:00AM - 11:15AM
Consideration of the roles of women and men from the 17th century into the 1840s, and the attitudes that shaped those roles in American society. The course will explore transatlantic influences and the interchange of European, Native American, and African American values. [H] [P]

HIST-3752-R01: COMING OF THE CIVIL WAR: (Advanced History Core)        
Cimbala, Paul
MR 10:00AM - 11:15AM
A history of the sectional crisis in America, focusing on the questions: Why did the South secede? Why did the North decide to fight rather than allow it? [H] [P]

HIST-3791-R01: AFRICAN-AMERICAN HISTORY I: (Advanced History Core/ Pluralism)        
Anderson, Robert B.
MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM       
Begins with an introduction to the African background and slave trade. An examination of U.S. slave communities, resistance and rebellion, abolitionism, institutional development through the Civil War. Readings in original texts from 18th and 19th centuries. [H] [D, P]

HIST-3822-R01: U.S. CULTURAL HISTORY: (Advanced History Core)        
Cornell, Saul A.
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM         
The focus of this course is on ideas, assumptions, and values in American life from colonial times to the present, from ministers' sermons to blues performances, from philosophical essays to Hollywood films. It examines the symbolic forms and social context of conflicting as well as shared beliefs and considers the character of American cultural expression on various levels, in ways in which different groups have influenced American cultural life, and the meaning of recent mass culture. [H] [P]

HIST-3857-R01: AMERICA SINCE 1945(Advanced History Core)        
Swinth, Kirsten N.
TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM        
Integrating economic, political and social history, this course will explore the development of the American economy, paying particular attention to transformations in the nature of work and labor relations. [H] [P]

HIST-3990-R01: NORTH AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY: (Advanced History Core)       
Stoll, Steven B.
MR 10:00AM - 11:15AM        
How has the natural environment figured in human history and how do we think historically about it? Where did our material world come from? How did a technological civilization appear in only two or three centuries, and what has been its effect on the environments of Earth? North American Environmental History attempts to answer these questions in a 400-year narrative of the Atlantic World, from before Columbus to the BP Oil Spill; from the Aztecs to modern Mexico City; from English capitalism to Globalization. The course covers many other subjects, including wilderness, suburbs, agriculture, disease, romantic painting, and the advent of the “Third World." In every instance, we will ask questions about the political and cultural forces at work in how people thought about Nature. [H] [P]

HIST-4652-R01: SEMINAR: LAWS AND OUTLAWS: (Advanced History Core)        
Crane, Elaine
M 1:30PM - 3:20PM        
This course deals with the legal culture of early America. Through primary and secondary readings we will explore both formal and informal law and the ways in which such “guidelines” affected the daily life of people in various communities. The class will consider historical writing as literature with particular emphasis on the microhistorical narrative. We will meet weekly and discuss the readings in a seminar format. It is absolutely essential that everyone read the assignments in advance and come to class ready to engage in discussion about the connections between history, law, literature, race, and gender. [H] [P]

PHIL-3730-R01: AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY        
Green, Judith
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM
The dominant trends and personalities in American philosophy with particular emphasis on Royce, Peirce, James and the pragmatic movement, Dewey, Whitehead and contemporary currents. [H] [P]

PHIL-4302-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY & ETHICS (Eloquentia Perfecta 3/ Pluralism/ Interdisciplinary Capstone Core)        
Van Buren, Edward J.
TF 11:30AM - 12:45PM
This seminar studies national and global environmental problems and policies with regard to the values or ethical questions involved in them. As such, it combines the disciplines of environmental policy (predominantly a social science field) and environmental ethics (predominantly a humanities field), both of which are by themselves interdisciplinary fields incorporating the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and applied arts and sciences. Environmental policy, often called environmental studies, is the interdisciplinary study of the creation, evolution, implementation and effectiveness of environmental policies that address national and global environmental problems such as climate change, placing particular emphasis on the use of history, anthropology, psychology, economics, sociology, and politics. Environmental ethics is the interdisciplinary study of the values or ethical dimensions of environmental problems and policies, with particular emphasis on the use of philosophy, history, literature, art and religion. Both disciplines emerged with the growing awareness of a national and global environmental crisis in the 1960s and 1970s. [R, H]

PHIL-4407-R01: GENDER, POWER & JUSTICE: (Senior Values)        
Murphy, Ann V.
TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This course examines the interplay between gender and various political and religious institutions both in the United States and elsewhere. Honing several philosophical accounts of gender, we will consider the ethical and political issues that arise in contemporary debates regarding gender and violence, women and warfare, Muslim women and the veil, and the relationship between sexual difference and humanism as a philosophical discourse. [R] [D, P]

PHIL-4407-R02: GENDER, POWER & JUSTICE: (Senior Values)        
Murphy, Ann V.
TF 11:30AM - 12:45PM
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This course examines the interplay between gender and various political and religious institutions both in the United States and elsewhere. Honing several philosophical accounts of gender, we will consider the ethical and political issues that arise in contemporary debates regarding gender and violence, women and warfare, Muslim women and the veil, and the relationship between sexual difference and humanism as a philosophical discourse. [R] [D, P]

POSC-3121-R01: NEW YORK CITY POLITICS (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core)
Berg, Bruce
MR 10:00AM - 11:15AM       
An analysis of the New York City political system. Attention will be paid to the participants in New York City government and politics, the factors that influence policy making in New York City, as well as public policies produced by the system. [H] [P]

POSC-3122-R01: RELIGION & AMERICAN POLITICS: (Interdisciplinary Capstone Core)   
McDermott, Monika L.
& Bayne, Brandon TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM         
This interdisciplinary seminar explores the nexus of religion and American public life. After treating topics related to electoral politics (e.g. canidate religion, voter religion, "value voters," religious rhetoric), students will then engage a series of "hot topics" that encompass ( and often combine) both religious and political discourse. The goal is to provide students with two alternative, yet complementary methods of analyzing the intersection of religion and American politics- one from a political science perspective and one from a theological perspective. [R] [P]

POSC-3209-R01: CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Hume, Robert J.
MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM
A casebook analysis of central issues of constitutional law. Examines the Constitution's origins, judicial review, federalism, separation and balance of powers, domestic and foreign affairs, the commerce clause, substantive due process, the rise of the administrative state, philosophies of interpretation. Presents the Constitution as defining a structure of government, rights and political economy. Examines the Constitution's role in American political development and democracy. [H] [P]

POSC-3217-R01: THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Cohen, Jeffrey E.
TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM        
An examination of presidential leadership, including the development, growth, and exercise of presidential power. Includes analysis of republican foundations of the presidency, organization and operation of office, role in domestic and foreign policy, relations with Congress, and the importance of character. [H] [P]

POSC-3229-R01: JUDICIAL BEHAVIOR (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Hume,Robert J.
MR 4:00PM - 5:15PM       
An examination of judicial decision making, this course explores classic and contemporary explanations for how judges decide cases. Topics include rival theories of constitutional interpretation as well as behavioral studies on the motivations of judges. [H] [P]

POSC-3307-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS (Advanced Social Science Core)        
Fleisher, Richard
TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM        
The course will deal with understanding how and why the political process leads to the types of policy choices affecting the environment that have been made by governmental actors rather than a policy oriented course in which the substantive alternatives for public policy in the area are examined and evaluated in some detail. [H] [P]

POSC-3309-R01: WOMEN IN AMERICAN POLITICS (Advanced Social Science Core)        
McDermott, Monika L.
TF 2:30PM - 3:45PM        
This course examines the role of women in three major areas of American politics: women as citizens and voters; women as candidates of elective office; and women as political officeholders. The course analyzes each of these areas in the context of the unique experience woman have had both historically and currently. [H] [P]

POSC-3645-R01: POLITICS OF IMMIGRATION (Pluralism, Advanced Social Science Core)        
Hinze, Annika M.
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM       
Immigration is one of the most controversial issues of our time. In the world’s industrialized countries, immigration has led to fierce political debates. But immigration also greatly affects the sending countries of immigration in their human and socio-economic capital, as well as their political influence. We can hardly look at immigration through just one lens: It is too multi-faceted and complex, as it entails legal and undocumented immigrants, high- and low-skilled immigrants, immigrants who come because they choose to, and those, who see no other choice but leave their countries, due to war, discrimination, or tremendous poverty. Aside from socio-economic fears, people in receiving countries of immigration also fear its socio-cultural impact and the change it mayprovoke in their societies. This course introduces students to the main questions underlying political debates on immigration, such as the composition of national and cultural identity, different senses of community, as well as political, social, and economic issues related to immigration in the United States and other countries on the receiving end of immigration. In doing so, we will examine the conflicts around and consequences of immigration for both immigrants and receiving countries, but we will also look at the reasons why immigrants leave their countries of origin. We will examine the ways immigrants settle in their new country, the strategies they use to integrate themselves intothe socio-cultural fabric, and the potential obstacles they encounter. Finally, we will explore and compare current political immigration debates in both Europe and North America. [H] [D, P]

POSC-4106-R01: SEMINAR: PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS        
Panagopoulos, Costas
R 2:30PM - 4:30PM     
This course will explore the complexitiesof presidential elections in the United States. Attention will be devoted to the nomination and general election phases of the process. Few aspects of the American electoral process have experienced as much change as the presidential nomination process over the course of the past few decades. Developments in presidential primaries, campaign finance and nominating conventions have dramatically altered the backdrop against which presidential candidates pursue the nomination. In general election contests, presidential campaigns have honed their targeting, communications and mobilization strategies considerably. This course will examine these developments and offer students an in-depth view of the politics of contemporary presidential elections. [P]

POSC-4210-R01: SEMINAR: STATE, FAMILY & SOCIETY (Senior Values)        
Berg, Bruce
M 2:30PM - 5:15PM        
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
This seminar will examine the relationship between political systems and the family by exploring the connection between varying philosophical/ideological perspectives on state intervention in the family. Public policy issues to be discussed will include marriage and divorce, adoption and foster care, child care, family and child autonomy and child and domestic abuse. [H] [P]

PSYC-3600-R01: MULTICULTURAL ISSUES (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core)        
Yip, Tiffany
TF 2:30PM - 3:45PM        
Prereq: PSYC 1000.
As the United States becomes increasingly diverse, it is important to understand the variety of cultures that make up this diversity. This course will serve to increase students’ awareness of multicultural topics such as discrimination and prejudice. We are all members of various social groups, therefore, much of the course will be based on students’ own experiences with their own and other social groups. [H] [D]

PSYC-4340-R01: LAW & PSYCHOLOGY: (Senior Values)
Cruise, Keith R.
TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
An introduction to (a) the issues relevant to understanding human behavior from the perspective of law and psychology and (b) the contributions of psychology as a behavioral science to such legal issues as legal evidence, juries, and criminal and civil responsibility. [H] [P]

PSYC-4340-R02: LAW & PSYCHOLOGY: (Senior Values)
TBA
TF 1:00PM - 2:15PM
Rose Hill Seniors Only.
An introduction to (a) the issues relevant to understanding human behavior from the perspective of law and psychology and (b) the contributions of psychology as a behavioral science to such legal issues as legal evidence, juries, and criminal and civil responsibility. [H] [P]

SOCI-2701-R01: INTRO TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE        
Sweet, Kerry R.
TF 10:00AM - 11:15AM
An overview of the criminal justice system: law, its sociology, and its social and political functions. A critical examination of law enforcement agencies, the judicial system, and corrections. [H] [P]

SOCI-2925-R01: MEDIA CRIME SEX VIOLENCE        
Sweet, Kerry R.
TF 8:30AM - 9:45AM        
An analysis of mass media reporting, presentation and explanation. [A, H] [P]

SOCI-2965-R01: SCIENCE FICTION & SOCIAL CRISIS        
Wormser, Richard L.
W 11:30AM - 2:15PM
In a dreamworld inhabited by battle weary heroes and heroines who confront alien forces, where machines find human beings disposable and wizards' spells sometimes fail, where madmen create monsters that threaten humanity, we enter a realm in which science fiction often stands as a metaphor for the human condition, resurrecting quasi-mythological perceptions that have all but vanished in our nonfictional scientific world. Through the use of selected readings, feature films and lectures, this course will examine the sociological insights that science fiction films and literature offer about how we live our lives in the "here and now" of the post modern world. [L, A] [C]

SOCI-3400-R01: GENDER, BODIES, SEXUALITY: (Pluralism)        
Avishai-Bentovim, Orit
W 11:30AM - 2:15PM        
This course explores how gender shapes our lives and the world around us, including our definitions and experiences of sexuality. Rather than simple biological differences, we will examine gender and sexuality as social constructions, as social relations, as contested sets of cultural meanings, as lived experiences, and as dimensions of social structure. Course materials include theoretical writings, empirical studies, autobiographical reflections, and films. These materials will inspire us to consider the social, economic, and cultural institutions and forces that shape our lives. The study of gender and sexuality is very broad in scope, and in this course we will focus on gender as a key dimension of all social structure and institutions, with a particular interest in the intersection between gender and sexuality and the shaping of gendered and sexed bodies. My hope is that you will develop a “gender lens,” a perspective on the sources and consequences of social constructs and social inequalities that shape the modern social institutions that we inhabit, such as schools, the workplace, the state, and the family. This includes a critical evaluation of widespread assumptions about gender that we often take for granted, such as the naturalness of categories of man” and “woman,” “femininity” and “masculinity” and “heterosexual” and “homosexual.” [H] [D]

SOCI-3405-R01: GENDER, RACE, CLASS (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core)        
Kurti, Zhandarka
MR 2:30PM - 3:45PM               
The primary purpose of this course is to study how the interconnections of gender, race and class, shape the structure of our society and affect how we relate to each other and the world around us. The course begins by examining gender, race and class as sociological concepts, with the purpose of using this framework to analyze and interpret contemporary social problems in the United States. The course is divided into two parts. The first part will examine gender, race and class in a conceptual and sociological framework to provide insight of how these social categories intersect in the social structure and have produced a highly stratified and unequal society. We will focus on how these categories intersect and directly affect the lived experience of populations in the United States through an examination of various issues such as unemployment and healthcare. In the second part of the class, we will move from the local to the global and examine the impact of globalization on our society, again through the lens of gender, race, class and sexuality. This class will use a wide range of historical documents, cartoons, films and documentaries to provide further insight into how gender, race and class shape our everyday experiences. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-3456-R01: MODERN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core)        
Bilous, Adriane
MR 10:00AM - 11:15AM        
American social movements and political protests have been vehicles of change and sometimes of resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and culture? Through theoretical and empirical assessment, this course introduces students to movements that have formed over such issues as poverty, racism, sexism, and environmental degradation.  Particular emphasis is given to diversity among social movement actors and the opportunities and challenges presented for social movements in a pluralist society. The last segment of the course will focus on the future of social movements, including the effects of recent challenges posed by globalization and growth in corporate power. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-3456-R02: MODERN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS: (Pluralism/ Advanced Social Science)        
Bilous, Adriane
TF 8:30AM - 9:45AM
American social movements and political protests have been vehicles of change and sometimes of resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and culture? Through theoretical and empirical assessment, this course introduces students to movements that have formed over such issues as poverty, racism, sexism, and environmental degradation.  Particular emphasis is given to diversity among social movement actors and the opportunities and challenges presented for social movements in a pluralist society. The last segment of the course will focus on the future of social movements, including the effects of recent challenges posed by globalization and growth in corporate power. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-3601-R01: URBAN POVERTY (Pluralism/Advanced Social Science Core)        
Rhomberg, Christopher
MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM               
This course deals with contemporary issues and problems in cities, with a special focus on residential segregation and urban poverty. [H] [P]

SOCI-4961-R01: URBAN ISSUES & POLICIES        
Rosenbaum, Emily V.
T 2:30PM - 4:59PM        
Rose Hill Seniors Only
This course examines inequality in the urban housing market, with a focus on differential access to housing/neighborhoods and the social and economic opportunities embedded in residential location.  Among the key topics are segregation (its causes and consequences), affordability, and the policies that have been implemented to resolve residential inequalities and their correlates.  All readings should be done prior to class, as class will consist of lecture and discussion. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-4970-R01: COMMUNITY SERVICE AND SOCIAL ACTION: (Senior Values)        
Rodriguez,Orlando
MR 8:30AM - 9:45AM
Community Service Required.
This course will deepen students understanding of the meaning of community service and social action in America and challenge them to confront the moral issues and social commitments necessary to be members of a just democratic society. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-4971-R01: DILEMMAS OF THE MODERN SELF: (Senior Values)        
McCarthy, E. D.
MR 11:30AM - 12:45PM
Modern selfhood or identity is studied as a series of conflicts or dilemmas "What is a self today?" What are the special problems of ourselves as modern and post-modern "subjects"? [H] [P]

THEO-3878-R01: RELIGION & AMERICAN POLITICS: (Interdisciplinary Capstone Core)   
McDermott, Monika L.
TF 1:00PM - 2:00PM           
This interdisciplinary seminar explores the nexus of religion and American public life. After treating topics related to electoral politics (e.g. canidate religion, voter religion, "value voters," religious rhetoric), students will then engage a series of "hot topics" that encompass ( and often combine) both religious and political discourse. The goal is to provide students with two alternative, yet complementary methods of analyzing the intersection of religion and American politics- one from a political science perspective and one from a theological perspective. [H, R] [P]

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