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American Studies


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Spring 2010 American Studies Courses at Rose Hill









Spring 2010 American Studies courses at Rose Hill

AMST 2000-R01     MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS IN AMERICAN CULTURE                     Roberta S. Gold       
MR 11:30 am-12:45 pm

An introduction to American cultural studies and a narrative cultural history of the United States, designed for students with an interest in the American Studies major but relevant for majors in other fields such as History and English. The major developments addressed may include events and problems such as the origins of American nationalism, Native American/European encounters, the institution of slavery, early social movements such as abolitionism and feminism; the "Market Revolution," the frontier and the border, imperial expansion, immigration and exclusion, new social movements since the 1960s, globalization, and the rise of the prison-industrial complex.


Spring 2010 courses at Rose Hill cross listed with American Studies

AFAM 3102-R01     THE BLACK FAMILY                                                                        Oneka LaBennett
MR 11:30 am-12:45 pm 
An examination of the history of the black family from slavery to the present facing on the social, political, and economic challenges facing this institution. [H] [D, P] (Pluralism)

AFAM 3150-R01     CARIBBEAN PEOPLES & CULTURE                                              Claude J. Mangum
T 02:30 pm-05:00 pm
An examination of the historical, cultural and contemporary characteristics of various ethnic groups in the Caribbean. Special attention will be devoted to Afro-West Indians. [H] [D, P] (Fulfills the Globalism and American Pluralism requirements in the Core)

AMCS 3200-R01     AMERICAN & CATHOLIC                                                              Mark S. Massa
TF 01:00 pm-02:15 pm
This course examines the contributions of various Catholic figures and movements from the end of the 19th Century to the start of the 21st. How did the various Catholic generations of the past 110 years understand themselves as Americans and Catholics? And how did subsequent generations change that understanding? This course will give particular emphasis to how younger generations initiated or prompted change, with an eye to discovering how youth culture today might be shaping the future of American Catholic identity. [R] [P]

ARHI 2520-R01     AMERICAN ART                                                                              Kathryn M. Heleniak
MR 11:30 am-12:45 pm
This course will examine the development of American painting, sculpture and architecture from colonial times to the early 20th century, with an emphasis on painting. Major artists will be discussed in depth (Copley, West, Allston, Cole, Church, Bierstadt, Mount, Bingham, Homer, Eakins, Cassatt, O'Keeffe and others).  [A] [C]

COMM 2301-R01   THE BROADCAST INDUSTRY                                                        John M. Micewicz
MR 10:00 am-11:15 am
The examination of the American broadcasting industry from a variety of perspectives, such as regulation, advertising, programming, technology, institutional structure and audience research. Lessons from broadcast history are used to shed light on contemporary concerns. [A, H] [P]

COMM 2525-R01   DIGITAL MEDIA & CYBERCULTURE                                             Janet Sternberg
W 06:00 pm-08:30 pm
A study of the technological, social and cultural events that created digital media and its emerging cyberculture. An exploration of digital media environments and digital research techniques.  [A] [C, P]


A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present. Lab fee. [A] [C] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

COMM 3108-R02     MOVIES & AMERICAN EXPERIENCE                                            Meir Ribalow
T 06:00 pm-08:30 pm
A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present. Lab fee. [A] [C] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

COMM 3112-R01     MEDIA LAW                                                                                   Suzanne C. Delio
W 06:00 pm-08:30 pm
This course is designed to introduce the communication and media studies major to the basic issues in the field of media law. Examined here are the Constitutional principles underlying the major Supreme Court cases that have established the parameters governing the use of communication technologies in the country. Special focus will be given to the various legal changes posed by new media. Juniors and Seniors only. [A, H] [C, P]

COMM 3205-R01     JOURNALISTS & THE LAW                                                         Arthur S. Hayes
MR 11:30 am-12:45 pm
Students should think of this course as a media law handbook for journalists. We will examine U.S. Supreme Court and federal appeals court opinions and other materials with the aim of developing: (1) an understanding of the fundamentals of free speech-free press law, (2) and ability to spot when journalists' conduct may lead to lawsuits alleging libel, violations of national security, violations of the fair administration of justice and defendants fair trial rights and invasion of privacy, (3) an understanding of journalists’ rights and privileges under the law, (4) the skills to read and analyze court opinions and reason as lawyers do. [A] [P]

COMM 3407-R01     THE SCIENCE FICTION GENRE                                                     Lance A. Strate
T 02:30 pm-05:00 pm
Sociological, cultural, and psychoanalytic analysis and criticism of the science fiction genre in cinema, television, radio, print and other media. [A] [C] Lab fee.

COMM 3571-R01     POPULAR MUSIC AS COMMUNITY                                             Thomas M. McCourt
W 08:30 am-11:00 am
This class will examine the ways in which popular music influences (and is influenced by) economics, politics, culture, and society. The course requires no formal musical knowledge, but it does require a great deal of passion and commitment.  Given the sprawling nature of popular music, we cannot hope to be all-inclusive. Therefore, we will focus on the last 50 years of American and English popular music (although student input from other areas is welcome. [A] [C] Juniors and Seniors only.

COMM 4001-R01     FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE                                                      Michael Tueth
MR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm
This course offers the opportunity for students to explore issues of morality and human values by viewing and responding to outstanding examples of American filmmaking.  The students watch the films outside of class, view clips in class, engage in discussions, and write one paper about a film of the student's choice which the student considers appropriate to the theme of the course, which changes with every semester.  Some themes have been: personal identity, social entrapment, encountering evil, human freedom, etc. Lab fee. [A] [C] (Senior Values)

COMM 4002-R01     VALUES IN THE NEWS                                                                  James A. Capo
TF 01:00 pm-02:15 pm
An examination of how news constructs and mediates personal and social values. This course considers how news frames discourse about reality, and then analyzes the framing of specific values, ethical issues and moral behaviors. [H] [C, P] (Senior Values)

ECON 3453-R01     LAW AND ECONOMICS                                                                    Booi Themeli
MR 02:30 pm-03:45 pm
This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. [H] [P]

ECON 3453-R02     LAW AND ECONOMICS                                                                   Booi Themeli
MR 02:30 pm-03:45 pm
This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. [H] [P]

ECON 3453-R02     LAW AND ECONOMICS                                                                   Booi Themeli
MR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm
This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. [H] [P]

ENGL 3325-R01     SLAVERY & 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE                                  Julie C. Kim
MR 02:30 pm-03:45 pm
Britain became a dominant economic and imperial power in the eighteenth century, yet its success was predicated on the labor of slaves, who were forcibly transported by the millions from Africa to the Americas. In this course, we’ll examine the impact of the slave trade and slavery on British and American writing between the years 1700 and 1800. We’ll also look at how slaves and former slaves responded to these institutions in writing and action. Today, slavery seems unjustifiable: how, then, did proponents of slavery explain their participation and reliance upon such a system? How did the British and Americans after the Revolution reconcile their ideals of liberty with the denial of rights to slaves? How did slaves challenge these justifications and contribute to the emergence of an eighteenth-century abolitionist movement? As we’ll see, texts became battlegrounds upon which writers of varying backgrounds and opinions debated the morality of slavery and the validity of racial distinctions. Slavery was a form of oppression, but it also served as the catalyst for literally thousands of essays, poems, novels, travel narratives, and other works on the subject. We won’t read all of these, of course, but we will read a representative sample to understand the central role played by slaves in the development of British and American thought and culture. Texts will include Aphra Behn’s Oroonoko, Isaac Bickerstaffe’s The Padlock, Phillis Wheatley’s Poems, George Colman’s Inkle and Yarico, Olaudah Equiano’s Interesting Narrative, John Stedman’s Narrative of an Expedition Against the Revolted Negroes of Surinam, Charles Brockden Brown’s Ormond, William Earle’s Obi, and Leonora Sansay’s Secret History. [L] [C, D]

ENGL 3629-R01     20TH CENTURY AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE              YvetteT. Christianse
MR 11:30 am-12:45 pm
A study of central African American writers in their cultural and historical contexts. [L] [C, D]  (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

ENGL 3919-R01     WRITING WHITENESS                                                                  Glenn S. Hendler
TF 02:30 pm-03:45 pm
"As long as you think you are white, there's no hope for you" (James Baldwin). What could Baldwin have meant by such a provocative statement? This course will address this question by tracing the process by which some Americans have come to think of themselves as "white," a category defined both against their own ethnic and national origins and against racial "others." [L] [C, D]

ENGL 3963-R01     COLONIZATION AND COSMOPOLITANISM                                  Wing Sze E. Leung
TF
01:00 pm-02:15 pm               
In this course, we will read, think, discuss and write about the ways in which colonization has shaped the different articulations of cosmopolitanism in both the history of European thought and twentieth-century Asian representational arts. [L] [C]

ENGL 4501-R01           
THE CITY IN LITERATURE                                                    Mark Caldwell
M 02:30 pm-04:20 pm
A seminar-style exploration of poetry and fiction about cities and city life. [L] [C]

HIST 3653-R01     GENDER IN EARLY AMERICA                                                      Elaine Crane
MR 11:30 am-12:45 pm
Consideration of the roles of women and men from the 17th century into the 1840s, and the attitudes that shaped those roles in American society. The course will explore transatlantic influences and the interchange of European, Native American, and African American values. [H] [D, P]

HIST 3681-R01     AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY TO 1860                         Saul A. Cornell
TF 01:00 pm-02:15 pm
This course surveys the intellectual and cultural history of the United States from its colonial origins up to the civil war. The primary focus of the class will be on intellectual history, but the course will also explore the complex interactions between elite culture and popular culture. The course will examine major intellectual movements such as Puritanism, Civic Republicanism, Democracy, Transcendentalism, Abolitionism, and the Pro-Slavery argument. In addition to analyzing the expanding world of print culture in Early America, the course will also consider developments in art, architecture, material culture, and music. The main focus will be on primary sources, but there will also be occasional readings drawn from modern scholarship. The course will combine lecture and discussion. [H] [P]

HIST 3794-R01     THE GREAT DEPRESSION                                                           Mark D. Naison
TF 01:00 pm-02:15 pm
An examination of the causes of the Great Depression and its impact on American society from 1929-41. Subjects covered will be the Hoover Administration, the New Deal, the labor movement, left wing and right wing movements at home and abroad, and the impact of the Depression on American values and American culture.  [H] [P]

HIST 3838-R01     HISTORY OF US SEXUALITY                                                        Doron Ben-Atar
MR 02:30 pm-03:45 pm
History of social, political, scientific and cultural battles over sexuality and reproduction in the United States from the Colonial Era to the present. [H] [D, P]

HIST 3990-R01     NORTH AMERICAN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY                      TBA
MR 10:00 am-11:15 am
The course will explore various aspects of North American Environmental History.  [H] [P]

HIST 4752-R01     SEM: AMERICA AT WAR                                                              Paul Cimbala
M 01:30 pm-03:20pm
An exploration of the interaction of war and society from the colonial era through Vietnam, presented in a seminar format.  [H] [P]

HIST 4780-R01     SEM: HISTORY OF CAPITALISM                                                 TBA
M 01:30 pm-03:20 pm
Political economy is the social science that treats the sources and methods of production for subsistence and wealth. It is the study of how political systems conceive of and organizes economic life and of the ideas people hold as they set out to derive wealth from nature. Its founding authors are still read today, although they tended to deny that ecology and economy could possibly come into conflict. Instead, they proposed mechanistic models in which the market resolved all contradictions. This seminar considers the various ways that capitalist societies have apportioned resources and conceived of nature, progress, and wealth. It is a topical historical survey intended to teach the origins, qualities and historical manifestations of this powerful social system. The course assumes no knowledge of economics and only a basic knowledge of American and European history. [H] [P]

IRST 3412-R01     IRISH AMERICA                                                                            TBA
MR 11:30 am-12:45 pm
This course traces the historical experience of Irish emigrants from the mid-17th century to the present day. [H] [P]

PHIL 3722-R01     NATIVE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY                                                Judith Green
MR 11:30 am-12:45 pm
This seminar-style course will explore the philosophical contributions of Native Americans (also known as American Indians, and best known by the names these diverse people have given themselves), including insights about how to preserve our biotic community and to live with one another amidst our American pluralism in ways that are spiritually satisfying. [R] [D] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

POSC 2102-R01     INTRODUCTION TO URBAN POLITICS                                      Paul P. Kantor
MR 02:30 pm-03:45 pm
A study of politics and power within urban political systems, including an examination of their historical development, current political economy, and prospects for the future. [H] [P] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

POSC 2205-R01     THE U.S. CONGRESS                                                                      Richard Fleisher
MR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm
A study of the historical development and current operation of the U.S. Congress. Particular attention is paid to the impact of elections, political parties, formal and informal rules and procedures, and congressional committees on the policies produced by Congress, and to Congress' relation to the executive branch. [H] [P]

POSC 2214-R01     CIVIL RIGHTS & LIBERTIES                                                          Robert J. Hume
TF 10:00 am-11:15 am
A casebook analysis of Supreme Court decisions on civil rights and civil liberties. Topics include freedom of speech and religion, the right to privacy, gender and racial equality, the death penalty, and protections against unreasonable searches and seizures. [H] [D, P]

POSC 2302-R01     MEDIA & PUBLIC OPINION                                                           Monika L. McDermott
MR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm
A critical examination of the nature, formation, and distribution of public opinion and partisan attitudes in the United States. Emphasis on the importance of the media in the formation of public opinion and the connection between public opinion and democracy.  [A, H] [P]

POSC 2315-R01     CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS                                                       Arnold I. Linhardt
M 06:30 pm-09:15 pm
This course undertakes an in-depth study of campaigns and voting, with an emphasis on the presidential and congressional elections. We will examine elections from the perspectives of candidates, political parties, interest groups, the media, political consultants, and voters. In addition, we will address some basic questions about elections in America: What are the rules? Who wins and why? What difference do elections make? [H] [P]

POSC 2315-R01     CAMPAIGNS AND ELECTIONS                                                       Costas Panagopoulos
MR 02:30 pm-03:45 pm
This course undertakes an in-depth study of campaigns and voting, with an emphasis on the presidential and congressional elections. We will examine elections from the perspectives of candidates, political parties, interest groups, the media, political consultants, and voters. In addition, we will address some basic questions about elections in America: What are the rules? Who wins and why? What difference do elections make? [H] [P]

POSC 3208-R01     LAW & SOCIETY                                                                             Robert J. Hume
TF 01:00 pm-02:15 pm
An assessment of the impact of courts on society, this course evaluates the success of groups that have tried to use courts to bring about social change, including African-Americans, women, and homosexuals. Theories of judicial impact will also be explored. [H] [D, P]

POSC 3321-R01     AMERICAN PUBLIC POLICY                                                             Claudia Halbac
TF 01:00 pm-02:15 pm
Analysis of the process of policy making at the national level, including the politics of selected policy issues. Studends examine how some issues never make it to the public agenda and the forces that shape those that do.
[P] [H]


POSC 3909-R01     VIETNAM, CUBA-JFK ASSASSINATION                                      Bruce Andrews
TF 01:00 pm-02:15 pm
This course will examine the dark underside to United States foreign policy and politics revealed by conspiracy and cover-up surrounding the Kennedy assassination. [H] [P]

PSYC 3600-R01     MULTICULTURAL ISSUES                                                             Tiffany Yip
TF 02:30 pm-03:45 pm
The focus of this course is the multicultural applicability of scientific and professional psychology. Traditional psychological theories, scientific psychology, psychological tests, and the practice of psychology will be examined and critiqued from cultural and socio-historical perspectives. Contemporary psychological theories and research specific to men, women, gay men, lesbians, and race/ethnicity will be reviewed. Note: Many studentsin this class will have taken Statistics and Research Methods, and Intro Psych (PSYC 1000) is a prerequisite.  [H] [D] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

SOCI 2420-R01     SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF RACE AND ETHNICITY                           Brian G. Arthur
MR 08:30 am-09:45 am
This course explores the historical and contemporary issues surrounding the impact that race and ethnicity have in society. Students will examine how racial and ethnic criteria often guide important economic, political, and social decisions that affect access to resources by various groups and which usually have major consequences for the individual. [H] [D, P] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

SOCI 2701-R01     INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE                                    Jeanne M. Flavin
MR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm
An overview of the criminal justice system: law, its sociology, and its social and political functions. A critical examination of law enforcement agencies, the judicial system, and corrections. [H] [P]

SOCI 2925-R01     MEDIA CRIME SEX VIOLENCE                                                        Kerry R. Sweet
TF 08:30 am-09:45 am
An analysis of mass media reporting, presentation and explanation. [A, H] [P]

SOCI 3255-R01     SOCIOLOGY OF MEDIA                                                                  Christopher D. Rhomberg
MR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm
This course examines the role of the media, particularly the news media, as a dominant institution in a contemporary democratic society. Students will examine news media content, the structure of news media organizations, and the relationship of news media organizations to other dominant institutions. The materials used for examination will be a variety of contemporary case studies. [A, H] [P]

SOCI 3405-R01     GENDER, RACE, CLASS                                                                    Stephanie M. Laudone
TF 01:00 pm-02:15 pm
This course examines the relationship between gender, race, and class as overlapping dimensions of social experience in the U.S. Drawing on a variety of sources, including theoretical, ethnographic, and literary writings, each of these dimensions is considered as part of a complex approach to social problems. [H] [D, P] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

SOCI 3407-R01     IMMIGRATION CITIZEN RACE/ETHNICITY                                  Greta A. Gilbertson
MR 11:30 am-12:45 pm
This course explores the meaning of race, ethnicity and citizenship in the incorporation of Black, White, Latino and Asian immigrants into the US, both historically and comparatively. [H] [D, P]

SOCI 3456-R01     MODERN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS                                  Evelyn Bush
TF 01:00 pm-02:15 pm
Social movements in 20th-century America have been vehicles of political protest, social change, and sometimes also resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and popular culture? In addition to a general andtheoretical assessment of social movements, this course introduces students to particular movements that have formed over such issues as alcohol consumption, racism, war, and abortion. [H] [D, P] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

SOCI 3602-R01     URBAN SOCIOLOGY                                                                          Christopher D. Rhomberg
MR 02:30 pm-03:45 pm
One of the most significant developments in human history has been the development of cities. Thiscourse will examine the evolution and contemporary characteristics of cities in sociological perspective. The course includes a descriptive overview of the growth and development of cities and a discussion of the current state of urban America. Particular attention will be paid to New York City. We will also analyze various theoretical approaches to understanding urbanization, such as the human-ecological and Marxist theories. [H] [P]

SOCI 3675-R01     LATINA WOMEN: IMMIGRATION AND INEQUALITY                  Norma E. Fuentes-Mayorga
TF 10:00am-11:15 am
This course provides an introduction to feminist as well as gender theories which now explain the stratification of women in both US and Latino societies. In addition, students are introduced to US-based Latino as well as Latin American literatures and the different dimensions or tools through which gender, socialization, and power stratification are measured. The objective of the course are: a.) to examine the historical processes that have structured the identity of Latina women as part of a minority group; b.) to review and provide synthesis of existing feminine and gender paradigms on power inequality; and c.) to provide critical analysis of the applicability of these models in understanding the current integration of Latina and immigrant women in American society. [H] [D, P] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

SOCI 3708-E01     LAW & SOCIETY                                                                             John G. Callahan
W 06:30 pm-9:15 pm
How and when did law originate? What functions does law serve to the society and to the individuals within that society? Students will examine theories of jurisprudence and alternative sociological perspectives dealing with selected legal and constitutional issues in the United States and Europe. Particular attention is focused on legal policy and social change. [H] [P]

SOCI 3708-R01     LAW & SOCIETY                                                                              Michael W. Cuneo
TF 11:30 am-12:45 pm
How and when did law originate? What functions does law serve to the society and to the individuals within that society? Students will examine theories of jurisprudence and alternative sociological perspectives dealing with selected legal and constitutional issues in the United States and Europe. Particular attention is focused on legal policy and social change. [H] [P]

SOCI 3714-R01     TERRORISM AND SOCIETY                                                           Kerry R. Sweet
TF 10:00 am-11:15 am
This course examines the history and societal causes of terrorism in its many forms, and the state's and society's counter-terrorist response. Among issues to be examined are the nature of terrorist ideology and the source of support for, and opposition to, terrorism among the people that terrorists claim to represent. Other issues to be examined are prevention preparedness and emergency responses to terrorist attacks, and political, civil, and human rights challenges faced by countries dealing with terrorism in the 21st century. [H] [P]

SOCI 4970-R01     COMMUNITY SERVICE AND SOCIAL ACTION                              Orlando Rodriguez
MR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm
This course will deepen students’ understanding of the meaning of community service and social action in America and challenge them to confront the moral issues and social commitments necessary to be members of a just democraticsociety. [H] [D, P] (Service Learning and Senior Values)

SPAN 3070-R01     THE LATIN-AMERICAN URBAN CHRONICLE                              Viviane A. Mahieux
TF 10:00 am-11:15 am
This course will cover the urban chronicle from the late 19th century to the present, exploring how this hybrid genre negotiates its link to literature, media, public space and the cultural economy of the city. [L] [C]

THEO 3281-R01     RELIGION IN AMERICA                                                                  Thomas J. Shelley
TWF 11:30 am-12:20 pm
A survey of religion in America from Colonial time through the present day. [R, H] [P] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

WMST 3010-R01     FEMINIST THEORY IN INTER-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE          Judith Green
MR 04:00 pm-05:15 pm
An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective. [R, H] [D, P] (Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)


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