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American Studies


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Spring 2013 American Studies Courses at Rose Hill









Spring 2013 American Studies courses at Rose Hill

AFAM-3115-R01: ML KING & MALCOLM X      

Chapman, M. TF 11:30am-12:45pm  

An examination of the lives, philosophies, and historical influences of Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. The purpose of this course is to examine the life and thought of Martin L. King Jr. and Malcolm X. Our main goals are to trace the development in their thinking, and to examine the similarities and differences between them. Finally, we will evaluate their contributions to the African-American freedom struggle, American society and the world. Our method of study will emphasize the VERY close reading of the primary and secondary material; the use of audio and videocassettes; lecture presentations and class discussions.  

[H] [D, P]

 

AFAM-3684-R01/ENGL-3684-R01: FOOD AND GLOBALIZATION

Kim, J and LaBennett, O. MR 11:30am-12:45pm  

This course will introduce students to some of the interdisciplinary theories and methods of American studies by focusing on issues of food and globalization.  Although theories of globalization have a long history, food has become a particularly fraught topic within recent debates over economy and culture. Addressing these debates, we will consider such questions as: Why is it important to study food?  What can tracing the global exchange of such products as sugar, rice, and fast food teach us about colonialism, interactions between Old and New World ecosystems, American imperialism, localization, and the emergence of new consumer cultures?  How does the transnational flow of food shape lived realities surrounding race, gender, body image, and class identity? We will explore food in a variety of geographical contexts, including the United States, the Caribbean, Latin America, and Asia, in order to engage with transnational and comparative currents in American Studies.        

[H, L] [C, D]

 

AFAM-4192-R01: RACE & RELIGION: TRANS-ATLANTIC

Anderson, R. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm      

Examines the construction and deconstruction of race policies in the Trans-Atlantic World from the 16th to 20th Centuries.  Focusing on the socio-economic, political, theological, and philosophical beliefs and practices that influenced these developments, students will grapple with the ethical and moral dilemmas presented by race-based policies and practices.  What does one do when a secular or religious policy or practice conflicts with one’s moral beliefs or ethical values?  To what extent is one allowed to cooperate with malevolence?  To what extent should one resist an immoral or unjust practice?  Using South Africa and the US as case studies, this course is divided into four historical periods: Colonization and Slavery, 1492-1862; Revolution and Reconstruction, 1860s-1890s, Segregation, 1890s-1940s; Apartheid and Civil Rights, 1940s-1990s.  

[H, R] [D, P]

 

AMST-2000-R01: MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS IN AMERICAN CULTURE

Gold, R. TF 1:00pm-2:15pm

An introduction to American cultural studies and a narrative cultural history of the US, designed for students with an interest in the American Studies major but relevant for majors in other fields such as History and English. The major developments addressed may include events and problems such as the origins of American nationalism, Native American/European encounters, the institution of slavery, early social movements such as abolitionism and feminism; the "Market Revolution," the frontier and the border, imperial expansion, immigration and exclusion, new social movements since the 1960s, globalization, and the rise of the prison-industrial complex.    

 

ANTH-3111-R01: NEW WORLD ARCHAELOLOGY      

Krasinski, K. MR 11:30am-12:45pm

What were the Americas like before the arrival of Europeans? This course investigates the prehistory of the western hemisphere with emphasis on the arrival and expansion of hunter-gatherer societies throughout the New World. Explore ancient Native American cultural adaptations from the Ice Age to today's global warming within the diverse and dynamic habitats of early times. Students will gain a broader appreciation of American Indian culture and diversity, as well as its extraordinarily long record of survival and achievement.       

[H] [D, P]

 

ANTH-3373-R01: ENVIRONMENT & HUMAN SURVIVAL        

Gilbert, A. TF 8:30am-9:45am  

This course is an inquiry into the biological and cultural processes by which human populations have adapted to the world's diverse ecosystems. Particular attention is devoted to issues of group survival in difficult habitats and the environmental impact of preindustrial and recently Westernized cultures.     

[H] [P]

 

ANTH-3490-R01: ANTHROPOLOGICAL POLITICAL VIOLENCE      

Consroe, K. TF 2:30pm-3:45pm

This course investigates the nature of political violence and articulate its many forms from the anthropological perspectives of gender, class, ethnicity, economics, and of course, politics. Specific areas of study include Northern Ireland, Germany, Sudan, Palestine, Mexico, Argentina, China, Australia, and the U.S. The course will discuss the motivations for action (or inaction) by governments, elites, and insurgents, and students will get to know some of the organizations working against political violence. Field trips will include visits to the United Nations, The United Holocaust Museum, and Ground Zero. Podcasts, news broadcasts, movies and audio documentation of events will provide further access to examples of global political violence.

[H] [P]

 

CISC-4650-R01: CYBERSPACE - ETHICS & ISSUES  

Chen, D. TF 11:30am-12:45pm

Course explores issues of personal and social morality in the context of the new technological developments related to the use of computers. Part I is devoted to constructing a framework within which these issues can be analyzed: the basis of ethical theories, and their application to practical decisions in life. Part II will be organized around a series of seminar discussions of student-presented papers. In the papers, you will be expected to analyze the ethical issues raised by the use of computers.  Paper topics will be selected from areas such as the following: software ownership and intellectual property, software piracy, defective software, misuse of software, privacy and information access, computer crime, viruses and hacking, computer security, and computer communication and freedom of expression. This list is not intended to be definitive, and students are encouraged to find other relevant topics of interest. Rose Hill Seniors only.

[A] [P]

 

COMM-2525-R01: DIGITAL MEDIA & CYBERCULT    

Sternberg, J. W 6:00pm-8:30pm       

A study of the technological, social and cultural events that created digital media and its emerging cyberculture. An exploration of digital media environments and digital research techniques.  

[A] [C, P]

 

COMM-3103-R01: VER CENSORSHIP/FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION  

TBA. T 2:30pm-5:15pm

The course examines 'censorship' as an abuse of power in order to silence, marginalize, or distort another's voice or viewpoint. We will explore the consequences of media constructions on individual and community expressiveness.  

[A] [P]

 

COMM-3108-R01: MOVIES & AMERICAN EXPERIENCE        

TBA. T 2:30pm-5:15pm  

A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present. Lab fee.     

[A] [C]

 

COMM-3108-R02: MOVIES & AMERICAN EXPERIENCE        

TBA. T 6:00pm-8:30pm.

A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early 20th century to the present. Lab fee.     

[A] [C]

 

COMM-3110-R01: PEACE, JUSTICE AND THE MEDIA 

Andersen, R. TF 2:30pm-3:45pm       

This course analyzes the ways in which the media represent the issues of peace and justice. Considering the relevance of peace and justice for democratic practicies, the variety of media depictions of such issues will be analyzed. Topics such as environmental and economic justice, poverty and the poor, race and gender, war and peace, and media values and ethics will be covered.     

[A] [C, P]

 

COMM-3111-R01: GENDER IMAGES IN MEDIA

TBA. W 8:30am-11:00am

TBA   

[A] [C]

 

COMM-3112-R01: MEDIA LAW

Delio, S. W 6:30pm-9:00pm    

This course is designed to introduce the communication and media studies major to the basic issues in the field of media law. Examined here are the Constitutional principles underlying the major Supreme Court cases that have established the parameters governing the use of communication technologies in the country. Special focus will be given to the various legal changes posed by new media. Juniors and Seniors only. 

[A, H] [P]

 

COMM-3205-R01: JOURNALIST & THE LAW   

Hayes, A. W 11:30am-2:00pm 

Students should think of this course as a media law handbook for journalists. We will examine U.S. Supreme Court and federal appeals court opinions and other materials with the aim of developing: (1) an understanding of the fundamentals of free speech-free press law, (2) and ability to spot when journalists' conduct may lead to lawsuits alleging libel, violations of national security, violations of the fair administration of justice and defendants fair trial rights and invasion of privacy, (3) an understanding of journalists’ rights and privileges under the law, (4) the skills to read and analyze court opinions and reason as lawyers do.        

[A] [P]

 

COMM-3307-R01: SOCIAL MEDIA       

Marwick, A. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm        

An introduction to computer-mediated communication, electronic networking, online Internet communication and emerging interactive social contexts, such as MUDS, Chat, Discussion Lists and the World Wide Web. This course includes computer-based observations and hands-on projects. Computer literacy not presumed. 

[A] [C]

 

COMM-3476-R01: ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDIA

Sternberg, J. T 6:00pm-8:30pm        

Review of ethical principles and examination of media-related issues such as freedom of expression, the right to privacy and the public's right to know. Juniors and Seniors Only.    

[A] [P]

 

COMM-3566-R01: MEDIA EFFECTS      

TBA. TF 10:00am-11:15am      

What are the effects of mass media on society? This question lies at the heart of mass communications. While many people feel that it is “obvious” that the media have a powerful effect on society, social scientists remain divided on the issue. Reviewing both classic and contemporary literature, we will trace the various models that have been offered as possible explanations for the mechanism of media influence.

[A] [C]

 

COMM-3681-R01: MEDIA/NATIONAL IDENTITY       

Maushart, S. T 2:30pm-5:15pm

An examination of case studies showing how national identity is inferred and organized by mass media. Questions include: How is nationalism produced by media discourse? How are outsiders portrayed? Who draws the boundaries between inside and outside, and how? Texts will include television, radio, print journalism, music and films.

[C]

 

COMM-4001-R01: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE      

TBA. W 11:30am-2:00pm        

This course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore the ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the students' appreciation of the films' artistic achievements. Rose Hill Seniors only.    

[A,R] [C]

 

COMM-4002-R01: VALUES IN THE NEWS       

Capo, J. TF 1:00pm-2:15pm    

An examination of how news constructs and mediates personal and social values. This course considers how news frames discourse about reality, and then analyzes the framing of specific values, ethical issues and moral behaviors. Rose Hill Seniors only.        

[A] [P] 

 

COMM-4004-R01: SOCIAL ETHICS IN TELECOMM.

Capo, J. TF 11:30am-12:45pm 

This course deals with the policy decisions and ethical issues facing society in the telecommunications age. Of special concern are the ethical issues raised by the melding together of heretofore discrete media into vertically integrated, profit oriented, corporations. Rose Hill Seniors only. Prereq: COMM 1010 & COMM 1011 [A] [P]

 

COMM-4603-R01: MEDIA & POPULAR CULTURE      

TBA. TF 2:30pm-3:45pm

An exploration of various forms of contemporary popular culture and their meanings in modern life. Theoretical approaches are discussed and various media texts such as film, television, advertising images, popular icons, music and style are analyzed.     

[A] [C]

 

COMM-4640: MULTICULTURALISM     

Hayes, A. T 2:00pm-5:30pm    

Course provides a comprehensive review and analysis of ethnic media (news & entertainment) history, ownership, management, production, content, advertising, self-identity, and audiences. Emphasis will be placed on late 20th and early 21st century issues and trends. Thus, the majority of course will focus on media owned by or targeting African-Americans, African immigrants, Latinos, Asian-Pacific Americans, and Middle-Eastern. See: http://newamericamedia.org/  (Relevant contemporary European-American media groups will also be covered. For example: the Irish Echo's coverage of immigration.)

[A] [D, P]

 

ECON-3453-R01: LAW AND ECONOMICS       

Themeli, B. MR 11:30am-12:45pm    

This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. Prereq: ECON 1200      

[H] [P]

 

ECON-3850-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS      

TBA. MR 10:00am-11:15am

Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies, from reducing air and water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone depleting gases. However, the environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike. Prereq: ECON 1200

[H] [P]

 

ECON-3850-R02: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS      

TBA. MR 11:30am-12:45pm     

Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies, from reducing air and water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone depleting gases. However, the environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike. Prereq: ECON 1200     

[H] [P]

 

ECON-4110-R01: ETHICS & ECONOMICS      

Themeli, B. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm        

This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution, and economic sanction. Rose Hill Seniors only. Prereq: ECON 1200
[H] [P]

 

ECON-4110-R02: ETHICS & ECONOMICS      

Themeli, B. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm        

This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution, and economic sanction. Rose Hill Seniors only. Prereq: ECON 1200
[H] [P]

 

ENGL-3041-R01: MODERN AMERICAN FICTION       

TBA. T 2:30pm-5:00pm  

This course considers modern American fiction of the twentieth century from a variety of critical perspectives. 

[L] [C]

 

ENGL-3333-R01: CAPTIVES/CANNIBALS/REBELS      

Kim, J. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm     

Cannibals, captives, and rebels are everywhere in early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think about why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and what they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; authors may include Mary Rowlandson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Eliza Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle. Rose Hill Sophmores and Juniors only.  

[L] [C]


ENGL-3336-R01: EARLY AMERICAN NOVEL
Fifelski, J. MR 11:30am-12:45pm
The American novel was a late arrival. No novels were published in America during the colonial period, and the first native entries in the genre appeared in the late eighteenth century, shortly after the formation of the United States and generations after the first English novels were published. This course will sketch the tradition of the American novel from its beginnings through the Civil War. To that end, we will read a selection of representative early American novels -- representative, that is, of the way that we view the history of the American novel today. We will consider the ways that the American novel comes into being: what literary categories it draws upon, and how. We will also trace the ways that American novels came to be valued (some more than others), in their own time and ours. And we will consider different ways of reading early American novels, employing approaches both old and new.
[L] [C]

ENGL-3436-R01: AMERICAN DREAM IN LITERATURE

Kavros, H. MR 8:30am-9:45am

In the course we will explore the changing conceptions of success and business in American literature in genres including the sermon, autobiography, short story, novel, and drama, and through literary periods including Puritanism, Transcendentalism, Realism, and Naturalism. 

[L] [C]

 

ENGL-3653-R01: MAJOR AMERICAN AUTHORS        

TBA. TR 5:30pm-6:45pm

This course provides an introduction to major American authors, including Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Dickinson, Whitman, James, Wharton, and others.

[L] [C]

 

ENGL-3662-R01: POSTWAR U.S. LITERATURE & CULTURE 

Contreras, D. TF 2:30pm-3:45pm        

This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history.  Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.   

[L] [C]

 

ENGL-3665-R01: COMING OF AGE, ASIAN AMERICA 

Kim, J. TF 10:00am-11:15am   

In the traditional coming-of-age story, the protagonist achieves personal maturity by internalizing the values of mainstream society. But what if you’re one of mainstream society’s outcasts? In this multimedia course, we will explore some of the competing strategies contemporary Asian American artists have developed to describe, narrate, and negotiate the difficulty of growing up on the margins. With the help of additional critical, theoretical, and historical readings, we will evaluate the extent to which Asian American artists contest hegemonic social values, revise the form of the traditional novel of development, and generally re-imagine what it means to come of age.        

[L] [D, C]

 

ENGL-3701-R01: AMERICAN WRITERS IN PARIS     

Collins, C. TR 5:30pm-6:45pm 

As a capital of modern Western culture, Paris has long been attractive to experimental artists from other countries, a home in exile to find supportive audiences, publishers, and collaborators. American writers were led to Paris early in the 20th century by such figures as Wharton, Stein, and Pound, who were followed by roughly two movements: after WWI, the "Lost Generation" of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and others, and after WWII, a circle of African American authors including Wright, Baldwin, and Himes. Through a selection of their works, as well as the art and music of the period, this course will explore the creative aims and cultural contexts of these three groups.

[L] [D, C]

 

HIST-3656-RO1: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION       

Crane, E. MR 11:30am-12:45pm       

The history of the Revolution and formation of the Constitution.         

[H] [P]

 

HIST-3753-R01: CIVIL WAR ERA, 1861-1877        

Cimbala, P. MR 10:00am-11:15am

A history of the war years and America's racial and sectional readjustment after the war.   

[H] [P]

 

HIST-3804-R01: CITY IN AMERICAN HISTORY       

Soyer, D. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm  

This course provides an overview of the development of American cities, with an emphasis on the people and communities of which they are comprised. It will examine such topics as the growth of the urban infrastructure, the origins of urban problems, sub-urbanization, and the image of the city in American culture. Using the resources of New York, the course seeks to give students the information and analytical skills necessary to interpret historically their urban environment.       

[H] [P]

 

HIST-3804-R01: CITY IN AMERICAN HISTORY       

Soyer, D. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm  

This course provides an overview of the development of American cities, with an emphasis on the people and communities of which they are comprised. It will examine such topics as the growth of the urban infrastructure, the origins of urban problems, sub-urbanization, and the image of the city in American culture. Using the resources of New York, the course seeks to give students the information and analytical skills necessary to interpret historically their urban environment.       

[H] [D, P]

 

HIST-3838-R01: HISTORY OF US SEXUALITY

Gold, R. TF 2:30pm-3:45pm    

History of social, political, scientific and cultural battles over sexuality and reproduction in the United States from the Colonial Era to the present.

[H] [P]


HIST-3880-R01: HISTORY OF THE COLD WAR
Dietrich, C. TBA.
The course will examine the Cold War as a political, economic, ideological, and military contest on a global scale. It will give special attention to the American role and experience in the origins of the conflict and its historical significance.  The course will familiarize students with the well- and lesser-known moments of crisis in the Cold War--the nuclear arms race, the Berlin Crises, the Cuban Missile Crisis, triangular diplomacy, superpower rapprochement, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Arab-Israeli wars, and the end of colonialism in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East.  Above all, it will place these events in context through a thorough examination of how international politics affected society in the United States and abroad between 1945 and 1991.
[H] [P]
 

HIST-3904-R01: AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY   

Himmelberg, R. TF 11:30am-12:45pm        

American economic development and growth, with attention both to market forces and economic policy and the connection and interplay between them, from the colonial era to the present. To what extent did governmental policies influence the impact of market forces in the history of economic development and to what extent did economic interests and considerations determine the classic events of American history, such as the Revolution, the Civil War, Imperialism and the Cold War?  Course imparts a sophisticated understanding of the causes of economic growth and of economic events and circumstances such as depressions, stock market fluctuations, inflation, wealth and income distribution and similar phenomena, items that exert so powerful an influence upon political and social historical development.  Requirements include a mid-term and final and occasional brief written assignments based on assigned readings of articles in the field.

[H] [P]

 

HIST-3910-R01: FROM TRUMAN TO CLINTON        

Himmelberg, R. TF 10:00am-11:15AM

Liberalism in the Truman era; victory of conservatism, 1952-1960; a new liberal agenda and social revolution in the 60's; Nixon, pragmatism and betrayal; America adrift, 1975-1980; return of conservatives.       

[H] [P]

 

HIST-3950-R01: LATINO HISTORY     

Acosta, S. TF 2:30pm-3:45pm  

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, sexuality, and citizenship. Specific topics include: United States colonial expansion and its effects on the population of Latin America; Mexican-Americans, and the making of the West; colonialism and the Puerto Rican Diaspora; Caribbean revolutions and the Cuban-American community; and globalization and recent Latina/o migrations (Dominicans, Colombians).   

[H] [D, P]

 

HIST-4650-R01: SEM: HISTORY AND FICTION       

Crane, E. 3:30pm-5:20pm

An examination of American history through America's leading novelists from Hawthorne on Puritanism to Faulkner on the American South, including such authors as Melville, Cooper, James, Wharton, Dreiser, Steinbeck, and Wright. Focus will be on problems inherent in presenting an accurate depiction of history through this literary form.    

[H, L] [P]

 

IRST-3412-R01: IRISH AMERICA       

TBA. MR 11:30am-12:45pm     

Course introduces students to the experiences of Irish emigrants and their descendants in the USA with an understanding of the gendered experiences of the labor market, the politics of the Irish-Americans, as well as cultural expressions of "Irish-ness" in America. Examines various aspects of Irish emigration to the USA and the different settlement patterns there at different times. Emphases include the role of the Irish in the establishment of the American Republic and their contributions in the labor force;  anti-Irish prejudice through the study of Nativism and the Draft Riots; Irish participation in the Civil War; the progress of the Irish in the USA through education and social mobility. We will also investigate the role of religion in integrating and differentiating the Irish in the USA. Students should be able to trace the intersection of region, class, gender and ethnicity in structuring the experiences of the Irish in theUSA.   

[H] [P]

 

MUSC-2031-R01: ROCK AND POP MUSIC SINCE WWII     

Gelbart, M. TF11:30am-12:45pm      

Rock and pop music have played key roles in Western culture for over half a century. This course considers the roots and musical features of rock and related styles, their changing status within "mainstream" culture, and the musical and ethical issues they raise. From the R&B music of the early 1950's to the British Invasion, punk, disco, rap, alternative and the spread of electronica, pop musicians have moved billions of people, while raising questions about race, gender, generation gaps, commercialism, and globalization.       

[A] [C]

 

PHIL-3722-R01: NATIVE AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY   

Green, J. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm  

This seminar-style course will explore the philosophical contributions of Native Americans (also known as American Indians, and best known by the names these diverse people have given themselves), including insights about how to preserve our biotic community and to live with one another amidst our American pluralism in ways that are spiritually satisfying.        

[R] [D]

 

POSC-2102-R01: INTRO TO URBAN POLITICS       

Hinze, A. TF 10:00am-11:15am

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the major themes in urban politics. The course will focus primarily on New York City and the varying sectors that encompass urban political processes. The course will address various themes pertaining to urban and civic development, power and leadership, the urban economy, race and coalition politics, immigration, governance, and city politics.

[H] [P]

 

POSC-3131-R01: POLITICS URBAN HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT      

Berg, B. MR 10:00am-11:15am

This course will examine the intersection of urban life, individual and community health and public policy. It will examine the evolution of urban public problems, the urban environment and the role and responsibility of society and the political system to respond to individual and health issues in urban settings. Rose Hill Sophomores and Juniors only.      

[H] [P]

 

POSC-3210-R01: CIVIL RIGHTS & LIBERTIES

Hume, R. MR 11:30am-12:45pm       

A casebook analysis of Supreme Court decisions on civil rights and civil liberties. Topics include freedom of speech and religion, the right to privacy, gender and racial equality, the death penalty, and protections against unreasonable searches and seizures.      

[H] [P]

 

POSC-3213-R01: INTEREST GROUP POLITICS       

Berg, B. MR 11:30am-12:45pm

An examination of pressure groups and their role in the political process. Special attention will be paid to the origins of groups, who joins and who does not and how groups affect their own members.     

[H] [P]

 

POSC-3214-R01: THE U.S. CONGRESS

Fleisher, R. TF 1:00pm-2:15pm

A study of the historical development and current operation of the U.S. Congress. Particular attention is paid to the impact of elections, political parties, formal and informal rules and procedures, and congressional committees on the policies produced by Congress, and to Congress' relation to the executive branch.    

[H] [P]

 

POSC-3215-R01: AMERICAN POLITICAL PARTIES   

Fleisher, R. TF 11:30am-12:45pm     

Examines the workings of American political parties and their role in the political system. Analyzes the effect of parties on the campaigns of presidential and congressional candidates, the influence of parties on the electoral decisions of voters, and the impact of parties on the workings of both the presidency and Congress as policymaking institutions.     

[H] [P]

 

POSC-3307-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL POLITICS

TBA. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm        

The course introduces students to the history and evolution of environmentalism and environmental policy.  

[H] [P]

 

POSC-4100-R01: SEM: AMERICAN POLITICS 

Cohen, J. M 2:30pm-5:00pm   

Discussion and analysis of selected problems in American politics, providing students with the opportunity to work on individually guided research projects. Preference is given to POSC majors.   

[P]

 

PSYC-3600-R01: MULTICULTURAL ISSUES   

TBA. TF 1:00pm-2:15pm

The focus of this course is the multicultural applicability of scientific and professional psychology. Traditional psychological theories, scientific psychology, psychological tests, and the practice of psychology will be examined and critiqued from cultural and socio-historical perspectives. Contemporary psychological theories and research specific to men, women, gay men, lesbians, and race/ethnicity will be reviewed. Prereq: PSYC 1000 or PSYC 1200

[H] [D]

 

PSYC-4340-R01: LAW & PSYCHOLOGY

TBA. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm        

An introduction to (a) the issues relevant to understanding human behavior from the perspective of law and psychology and (b) the contributions of psychology as a behavioral science to such legal issues as legal evidence, juries, and criminal and civil responsibility. Rose Hill Seniors only. Class will meet in a Psychology Department Seminar Room.       

[H] [P]

 

PSYC-4340-R02: LAW & PSYCHOLOGY

TBA. TF 1:00pm-2:15pm

An introduction to (a) the issues relevant to understanding human behavior from the perspective of law and psychology and (b) the contributions of psychology as a behavioral science to such legal issues as legal evidence, juries, and criminal and civil responsibility. Rose Hill Seniors only.  

[H] [P]

 

SOCI-1050-R01: SOCIOLOGY FOCUS 

McGee, M. TF 11:30am- 12:45pm      

This class considers the ideology and practices of self-invention that are part of what some might call an American ethos.  The course takes as its objects of study the autobiographies of distinguished Americans (such as Benjamin Franklin, Frederick Douglass, Helen Keller, Temple Grandin, and Barack Obama) and the sociological theories (for example, works by C.W. Mills, W.E.B. Dubois, George Herbert Mead, Michel Foucault, Patricia Hill Collins) surrounding the relationship between self-making, governance, and social order. Rose Hill Freshmen only

[H, L] [D, C]

 

SOCI-2847-R01: THE 60s: SEX, DRUGS, ROCK & ROLL    

Wormser, R. W 11:30am-2:15pm      

During the tumultuous 1960s, American society was marked by a number of political, social and cultural movements led by youth. They struggled for freedom on many levels.  African Americans struggled against the oppression of racial segregation of the South in the Civil Rights Movement: young people sought sexual freedom and the right to experiment with drugs; musicians broke away from the restraints of traditional pop singing (Frank Sinatra, Nat “King” Cole, Pat Boone) and folk songs and created the world of rock and roll; politically minded youth attacked the traditional institutions of political and economic power by protesting against the war in Vietnam; women challenged traditional male attitudes that confined them to domesticity or inferior status in the work place and in society; gays organized against the repressive laws and prejudices against homosexuality.  Course shows how SOCIAL CHANGE TAKES PLACE THROUGH SOCIAL ACTION and how many of the beliefs and attitudes of today’s youth are connected to the momentous social changes of the 1960s

[H] [D, P, C]

 

SOCI-2925-R01: MEDIA CRIME SEX VIOLENCE       

Sweet, K. TF 8:30am-9:45am

An analysis of mass media reporting, presentation and explanation.   

[A, H] [P]

 

SOCI-3003-R01: ART AND SOCIETY   

McGee, M. W 11:30am-2:25pm

The study of culture generally, and art world more specifically, allows us to understand the arts not only as aesthetics experiences, but also as institutional, economics, social, and political phenomena. Incorporating methods and insights from sociology and anthropology, and drawing on the resource of the immediate context of New York City’s cultural communities and institutions, the course will introduce students to issues in and methods for cultural analysis. The analysis of art worlds will include: 1) a consideration of the intentions of creative agents or producers; 2) the distribution of these objects within particular systems; and, 3) the reception and interpretation of these objects by and within particular social groups or communities. 

[A, H] [P]

 

SOCI-3052-R01: ETHICS OF MODERN SELFHOOD   

Hinze, B. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm  

Course focuses on the modern culture of self or identity which is examined as a series of personal and moral conflicts and dilemmas: those of public and private life; of “society” (or community) and the “individual”; the conflict of rationality over emotionality (and control and release); of personal freedom (“choice”) and social control (determination); and the more recent conflicts concerning personal freedom and individuality (and the individual’s mind) in the face of the growth of “mass society” and its “mass culture.” In modern novels, political and sociological treatises, films, and personal memoirs these conflicts are given expression and can be studied as a modern and postmodern discourse about selfhood today in which we can discover some of the principal moral dilemmas of persons today. Using various texts and images, course addresses the questions, “What is a self today?”  What are the special problems and ethical dilemmas of our worlds and ourselves as modern and postmodern “subjects”?

[H] [D, C]

 

SOCI-3255-R01: SOCIOLOGY OF MEDIA      

Yorukoglu, I. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm     

This course examines the role of the media, particularly the news media, as a dominant institution in a contemporary democratic society. Students will examine news media content, the structure of news media organizations, and the relationship of news media organizations to other dominant institutions. The materials used for examination will be a variety of contemporary case studies.

[A, H] [P]

 

SOCI-3300-R01: "RACE" AND "MIXED RACE" 

Miyawaki, M. TF 10:00am-11:15am    

The origins of "race," its historic role and social construction are examined. Ancient and modern day ideas are explored. Contrasts between the United States and Latin American conceptions of "race" and "mixed race" are analyzed. Future implications are discussed.            

[H] [D, P]

 

SOCI-3405-R01: GENDER, RACE, CLASS       

Kurti, Z. TF 1:00pm-2:15pm     

This course examines the relationship between gender, race, and class as overlapping dimensions of social experience in the U.S. Drawing on a variety of sources, including theoretical, ethnographic, and literary writings, each of these dimensions is considered as part of a complex approach to social problems.     

[H] [D, P]

 

SOCI-3418-R01: CONTEMPORARY IMMIGRATION GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES

Gilbertson, G. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm     

Over the last four decades, immigration has again transformed the US.  It is also producing significant changes in other countries, from the European nations that used to send their citizens to the US more than a century ago, to oil-rich Middle Eastern states and developing nations.  Why do people migrate across international borders?  Can states control migration, especially “unwanted” migrants?  Course begins with these questions, and examines the policies that let some people in, while keeping others out.   Considers incorporation, the process by which foreign “outsiders” become integrated in their new home.  Are immigrants and their children becoming part of the U.S. mainstream?  What is the mainstream?  The arrival of newcomers also affects the cultural, economic, political and social dynamics of the countries and communities that receive them.  How do sociologists evaluate and theorize immigrant integration?  Course ends by looking at topical debates around membership, including citizenship.  The large-scale movement of people raises questions about belonging, nationality and social cohesion.  Course is centered on the U.S. case, but we consider other nations and the lessons they provide. Rose Hill Sophomores and Juniors only    

 

SOCI-3456-R01: MODERN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS        

Bush, E. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm   

Social movements in 20th-century America have been vehicles of political protest, social change, and sometimes also resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and popular culture? In addition to a general and theoretical assessment of social movements, this course introduces students to particular movements that have formed over such issues as alcohol consumption, racism, war, and abortion. 

[H] [D, P] 

 

SOCI-3500-R01: CONTEMPORARY FAMILY ISSUES  

Weinshenker, M. MR 10:00am-11:15am        

This class focuses on the sociology of the family by exploring issues relating to the status and functioning of families in contemporary United States society. The issues examined include sexuality, childbearing, divorce and remarriage, domestic violence, links between generations and the current state of social policy.

[H] [D, P]

 

SOCI-3504-R01: WORK AND FAMILY  

Rhomberg, C. MR 10:00am-11:15am 

This course explores the relationship between people's work and family lives, and why work-family conflict has increased in recent years. We discuss the causes and consequences of work-family conflict, with consequences being workers' psychological and physical well-being, child development and well-being, workplace productivity, and issues related to employee recruitment and retention. We study how work-family issues are affected by current trends in society and the economy and labor market, and we look at the roleof work flexibilitypolicies in reducing work-family conflict.    

[H] [P]

 

SOCI-3506-R01: DIVERSITY IN AMERICAN FAMILIES        

Avishai-Bentovim, O. W 11:30am-2:15pm   

In this course students will learn the basics of qualitative social science research.  Students will brainstorm a project, set research goals, find relevant literature, learn how to collect and analyze data, and observe research ethics.  During the semester students will work on a project of their choosing that will culminate in an empirically based final paper.  Students planning to write a thesis or conduct an independent research project based on qualitative research will find this course particularly helpful.        

[H] [D]

 

SOCI-3603-R01: URBAN AMERICA      

Rhomberg, C. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm    

This course offers an introduction to urban sociology and to the study of American urban society. Particular attention will be paid to New York City. Topics include the rise of “global” cities like New York, metropolitan growth and inequality, urban policy, and politics, patterns of class, racial, and ethnic group formation, and local community organization.     

[H] [P]

 

SOCI-3708-R01: LAW & SOCIETY       

Kontos, L. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm 

An assessment of the impact of courts on society, this course evaluates the success of groups that have tried to use courts to bring about social change, including African-Americans, women, and homosexuals. Theories of judicial impact will also be explored.    

[H] [D, P]

 

SOCI-3714-R01: TERRORISM AND SOCIETY 

Sweet, K. TF 10:00am-11:15am

This course examines the history and societal causes of terrorism in its many forms, and the state's and society's counter-terrorist response. Among issues to be examined are the nature of terrorist ideology and the source of support for, and opposition to, terrorism among the people that terrorists claim to represent. Other issues to be examined are prevention preparedness and emergency responses to terrorist attacks, and political, civil, and human rights challenges faced by countries dealing with terrorism in the 21st century.   

[H] [P]

 

SPAN-3002-R01: LATIN AMERICA: LITERATURE/CULTURE SURVEY    

TBA. TF 10:00am-11:15am      

The study of Spanish-American society through its cultural expressions: literature, art, music, film, and print journalism. To focus, in a given semester, on topics such as: "Literature and Art in Colonial Spanish America," "Literature and Film in Contemporary Spanish America," "Revolution in Spanish American Literature and Art," "Civilization and Barbarism," "National Identity, Race, and Gender in Spanish America," "Dictatorship and Resistance in Spanish America," and others. Taught in Spanish.            

[L] [C, D]

 

THEO-3952-R01: ETHICS OF MODERN SELFHOOD   

Hinze, B. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm  

An interdisciplinary capstone course on the topic of the modern and postmodern self or identity. Texts include materials from the social sciences and humanities. Approaches discussed include the argument of Richard B. Miller (2005) and others who argue that the study of culture offers resources for the study of ethics and religious ethics, one that pays close attention to the use of rhetorics and genres in everyday life and popular culture. Principal focus is the modern culture of self or identity which is examined as a series of personal and moral conflicts and dilemmas: those of public and private life; of “society” (or community) and the “individual”; the conflict of rationality over emotionality (and control and release); of personal freedom (“choice”) and social control (determination); and the more recent conflicts concerning personal freedom and individuality (and the individual’s mind) in the face of the growth of “mass society” and its “mass culture.” Using modern novels, political and sociological treatises, films, personal memoirs, these conflicts are given expression and can be studied as a modern and postmodern discourse about selfhood today in which we can discover some of the principal moraldilemmas ofpersons today. Using various texts and images we address the questions, “What is a self today?”  What are the special problem and ethical dilemmas of our worlds and ourselves as modern and postmodern “subjects”?
[R] [L] [C,D, P]

        

WMST-3010-R01: FEMINIST THEO IN INTER-CULT  

Green, J. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm  

An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class,race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective.

[L] [C, D, P]


Summer 2013 American Studies courses at Rose Hill

We are pleased to offer an AMST summer session class for the first time this summer!

AMST-2800-R01: AMERICAN LEGAL LEASONING
Hayes, A. Session II: MTWTH 1:00pm-4:00pm. 4 credits.
This course has two objectives: (I) To introduce students to the basics of legal reasoning by using Socratic dialogue, case analysis, research, and writing. (II) To give students a basic understanding of the history and operations of the U.S. Supreme Court and its impact on the American judicial and political systems, culture and economy.
[H] [P]


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