Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 
American Studies


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Spring 2013 American Studies Courses at Lincoln Center









Spring 2013 American Studies courses at Lincoln Center

AFAM-3669-L01: RACING THE CITY

Cox, A. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm

Racing the City uses canonical and non-traditional urban ethnographies to consider how race was and continues to be constructed and disavowed within U.S. ethnographic research in communities defined as urban, Black, low-income, and, in some less frequent cases, as middle-class, suburban and aspiring. In this upper-level course, students will question how ideas of authentic racial identity are connected to collective readings of American citizenship as it is translated through anthropological and sociological ethnographic research. 

[H] [D]

 

AFAM-4650-L01: SOCIAL WELFARE AND SOCIETY
TBA. TBA.
An examination of American values and attitudes about poverty, entitlement and dependency and the role of the state, individuals and society in social welfare. Presents an exploration of how experiences such as homelessness, welfare and unemployment are conceptualized in American society and how this thinking affects our values over time. Fulfills senior values requirement.
[H] [D, P]

ANTH-3725-L01: CULTURE AND CULTURE CHANGE
Sawalha, A. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm
Selected issues in the relationship of human behavior and culture. Issues dealt with in this course include the concept of culture, culture and the individual, culture contact, and culture change.
[H] [P]

COMM-3321-L01: HIS OF TV & RADIO NEWS
Knoll, S. TF 1:00pm-2:15pm
Traces the history of electronic journalism, from its infancy in the 1930's to the present day; emphasis on the work of the most prominent broadcast journalists of these decades.     
[A] [P]

COMM-3332-L01: UNDERSTANDING TELEVISION
Clark, J. TF 2:30-3:45pm
Critical Analysis of television as a storytelling medium. Study of current approaches to television narrative and style. Screenings and discussion of TV series and news programming.
[A] [P]

COMM-4001-L01: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE
Auster, A. T 2:30pm-5:15pm
From the clarities of the American Western to the ambiguities of film noir and the religious/philosophical intricacies of many European directors, the theme of good and evil has been a constant one in cinematic history. This course examines how the complexities of human morality are played out, puzzled over, made visually and narratively compelling by directors such as Ford, Kubrick, Reed, Welles, Scorsese, Fellini, Bergman and Rohmer. Lab fee.
[A] [C]

COMM-4001-L02: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE
Tueth, M. TF 11:30am-12:45pm
From the clarities of the American Western to the ambiguities of film noir and the religious/philosophical intricacies of many European directors, the theme of good and evil has been a constant one in cinematic history. This course examines how the complexities of human morality are played out, puzzled over, made visually and narratively compelling by directors such as Ford, Kubrick, Reed, Welles, Scorsese, Fellini, Bergman and Rohmer. Lab fee.
[A] [C]

 

COMM-3571-L3: POPULAR MUSIC AS COMMUNITY
Karasick, A. TF 10:00am-11:15am
Current issues in popular music studies-mediation, globalization, authenticity, identity, community, etc.- covering a wide range of popular music in North America. Regular reading and listening assignments.     
[A] [P]

 

ENGL-3843-L01:EXTRAORDINARY BODIES
Appels, J. W 8:30am-11:00am
From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives.
[A] [C]

HIST-3772-L01: HUDSON RIVER
Panetta, R. W 8:30am-11:00am
Rivers are the central geographical markers for the growth of civilization. Examination of the formative role of the Hudson in American economic development and the shaping of cultural identity. The ways in which the history of Hudson mirrors our relationship with nature and is central to the emergence of the modern environmental movement will also be examined.     
[H] [P]

HIST-3795-L01: US BETWEEN WARS 1919-1941

Krukofsky, H. MW 1:00pm-2:15pm
An overview of American history from the end of World War I to America's entry into the 2nd World War.
[H] [P]

HIST-3831-L01: THE RISE OF THE AMERICAN SUBURB
Panetta, R: MR 4:00-5:15pm
TBA
[H] [P]

PHIL-3195-L01: POLITICAL LIBERTARIANS & CRITICS
TBA. TBA    
An exposition & critique of political libertarianism - a philosophical theory developed by Ayn Rand, Hayek, Friedman, Nozick, Naveson & others - that has come to dominate neoconservative political thought in the U.S. We will read major libertarian texts & criticisms by David Gauthier, Hazlett, Rawls, Singer, and other defenders of public goods.     
[R, H] [P]

POSC-3304-L01: ELECTIONS & PARTIES
TBA. TBA    
Examines the role of political parties and elections in American democracy and political development. Topics include electoral participation and apathy, political campaigns, rules of the game, realignments, interest aggregation, the two party system, third parties, reform proposals, and the relation of parties and elections to policy-making.     
[H] [P]

PSYC-3600-L01: MULTICULTURAL ISSUES
Rivera Mindt, M. TF 2:30pm-3:45pm
The focus of this course is the multicultural applicability of scientific and professional psychology. Traditional psychological theories, scientific psychology, psychological tests, and the practice of psychology will be examined and critiqued from cultural and socio-historical perspectives. Contemporary psychological theories and research specific to men, women, gay men, lesbians, and race/ethnicity will be reviewed.
[H] [D]

PSYC-3720-L01: PYSCHOLOGY OF WOMEN

Nadien, M. W 6:00pm-8:45pm

Psychology of Women focuses on theory and research that examine women as well as gender (female-male) similarities and differences.  Topics include the following: (1) the origins of stereotypes (negative and/or positive) of women (and, secondarily, of men) in mythology, religion, and various historical periods); (2) life-span development of females (and, to some extent, of males) in terms of their biological makeup and in their physical and sexual growth and functioning; (3) questions of gender similarities and differences in (a) intimacy, parenting, and reproduction; (b) various types of cognitive ability and achievement; (c) social roles and social relationships; (d) personality traits; (e) mental and physical health; and (f) acts of violence and exploitation.

[H] [D]


PSYC-4340-L02: LAW & PSYCHOLOGY
Takooshian, H. F 6:00pm-8:45pm
An introduction to (a) the issues relevant to understanding human behavior from the perspective of law and psychology and (b) the contributions of psychology as a behavorial science to such legal issues as legal evidence, juries, and criminal and civil responsibility.
[H] [P]

SOCI-3017-L01: INEQUALITY IN AMERICA
Gunderson, C. MW 1:00pm-2:15pm
A study of the ways in which inequalities of wealth, power, and prestige are institutionalized in complex societies. Social class and social status as they relate to other aspects of social organization and affect the life chances of individuals.     
[H] [P]

SOCI-3401-L01: GENDER, CRIME, JUSTICE
Flavin, J. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm
This course describes, explains, and challenges the treatment of men and women victims, offenders, and workers in the criminal justice system. In the process, we will examine and critique a) theoretical and empirical approaches to gender and crime, b) the role of the criminal law, and c) our responses to crime and victimization. Issues of race, class, and sexuality also will be raised.     
[H] [P]

SOCI-3408-L01: DIVERSITY IN AMERICAN SOCIETY
TBA. TBA

An examination of historical and contemporary diversity in the United States. Diversity is defined according to ethnicity, race, religion, class, and other relevant social groups. A comparison of the situation of old and new ethnic and immigrant groups will be made with special attention to factors affecting integration into the society.
[H] [P, D]

SPAN-2640-L01: SPANISH & NEW YORK CITY (Service-Learning, Community Service Required)

Kasten, C. TF 1:00pm-2:15pm
This course works to achieve greater linguistic fluency and cultural understanding of the Spanish-speaking world. We will examine the Latin Americans and Latino experience in NYC through a variety of written and visual texts. Students will work in community to improve their language skills and cultural understanding in a highly contextualized environment. Community service required.

THEA-4045-L01: YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLACK
Jones, D. W 11:30am-2:15pm
This interdisciplinary course will explore themes of political, social, and personal transgression and transformation in the cultural tradition of Black American Theatre and performance from the Harlem Renaissance, through the Black Arts Movement to the present. The interrelationship of text, music, and movement will be highlighted to underscore significant aesthetic innovations and also to allow for a discussion of plays, playwrights, and performers in the fullestpossible context.     
[L, A] [C, D]


THEO-3375-L01: AMERICAN RELIGIOUS TEXTS
Seitz, J. MR 10:00am-11:15am
A critical and contextual reading of classical texts in American Religions History, focusing on diverse traditions and the crucial importance of religious perspectives to American culture, society, and self understanding.
[R]

THEO-3375-L02: AMERICAN RELIGIOUS TEXTS
Seitz, J. MR 2:30pm-3:45pm
A critical and contextual reading of classical texts in American Religions History, focusing on diverse traditions and the crucial importance of religious perspectives to American culture, society, and self understanding.
[R]

WMST-3010-L01: FEMINIST THEOLOGY IN INTER-CULT
Hoffman, A. MR 4:00pm-5:15pm
An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective.
[L] [D, P]


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