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Spring 2014 American Studies Courses at Rose Hill









Spring 2014 American Studies Courses at Rose Hill

AMST-2000-R01: MAJOR DEVELOPMENTS IN AMERICAN CULTURE (Pluralism)
Gold, Roberta. TF 2:30-3:45PM

An introduction to American cultural studies and a narrative cultural history of the US,
designed for students with an interest in the American Studies major but relevant for
majors in other fields such as History and English. The major developments addressed may
include events and problems such as the origins of American nationalism, Native
American/European encounters, the institution of slavery, early social movements such as
abolitionism and feminism; the "Market Revolution," the frontier and the border, imperial
expansion, immigration and exclusion, new social movements since the 1960s, globalization,
and the rise of the prison-industrial complex. [Required for the major and minor.]

AFAM-3115-R01: ML KING & MALCOLM X
Chapman, Mark. TF 2:30PM-5:15PM

An examination of the lives, philosophies, and historical influences of Martin Luther King Jr.
and Malcolm X. The purpose of this course is to examine the life and thought of Martin L.
King Jr. and Malcolm X. Our main goals are to trace the development in their thinking, and
to examine the similarities and differences between them. Finally, we will evaluate their
contributions to the African-American freedom struggle, American society and the world.
Our method of study will emphasize the VERY close reading of the primary and secondary
material; the use of audio and videocassettes; lecture presentations and class discussions.
[H] [D, P]

ANTH-3111-R01: NEW WORLD ARCHAELOLOGY
Krasinski, Kathryn. TF 10:00AM-11:15AM

What were the Americas like before the arrival of Europeans? This course investigates the
prehistory of the western hemisphere with emphasis on the arrival and expansion of huntergatherer
societies throughout the New World. Explore ancient Native American cultural
adaptations from the Ice Age to today's global warming within the diverse and dynamic
habitats of early times. Students will gain a broader appreciation of American Indian culture
and diversity, as well as its extraordinarily long record of survival and achievement. [H]
[D, P]

ANTH-3152-R01: SPORTS & NATIONAL POLITICS
Benavides, Oswaldo H. MR 4:00PM-5:15PM

Description TBA. [H] [D, P]

ANTH-3373-R01: ENVIRONMENT & HUMAN SURVIVAL
Gilbert, Allan. TF 8:30AM-9:45AM

This course is an inquiry into the biological and cultural processes by which human
populations have adapted to the world's diverse ecosystems. Particular attention is devoted
to issues of group survival in difficult habitats and the environmental impact of preindustrial
and recently Westernized cultures. [H] [P]

ANTH-3490-R01: ANTHRO POLITIC VIOLENCE
Consroe, Kimberly. TF 2:30PM-3:45PM

This course investigates the nature of political violence and articulate its many forms from
the anthropological perspectives of gender, class, ethnicity, economics, and of course,
politics. Specific areas of study include Northern Ireland, Germany, Sudan, Palestine,
Mexico, Argentina, China, Australia, and the U.S. The course will discuss the motivations for
action (or inaction) by governments, elites, and insurgents, and students will get to know
some of the organizations working against political violence. Field trips will include visits to
the United Nations, The United Holocaust Museum, and Ground Zero. Podcasts, news
broadcasts, movies and audio documentation of events will provide further access to
examples of global political violence. [H] [P]

ARHI-2520-R01: AMERICAN ART
Heleniak, Kathryn. MR 10:00AM-11:15AM

DESCRIPTION TBA. [A] [C]

CISC-4650-R01: CYBERSPACE - ETHICS & ISSUES
Chen, David. TF 1:00PM-2:15PM

Course explores issues of personal and social morality in the context of the new
technological developments related to the use of computers. Part I is devoted to
constructing a framework within which these issues can be analyzed: the basis of ethical
theories, and their application to practical decisions in life. Part II will be organized around a
series of seminar discussions of student-presented papers. In the papers, you will be
expected to analyze the ethical issues raised by the use of computers. Paper topics will be
selected from areas such as the following: software ownership and intellectual property,
software piracy, defective software, misuse of software, privacy and information access,
computer crime, viruses and hacking, computer security, and computer communication and
freedom of expression. This list is not intended to be definitive, and students are
encouraged to find other relevant topics of interest. Rose Hill Seniors only.
[A] [P]

COMM-2525-R01: DIGITAL MEDIA & CYBERCULT
Instructor TBA. MR 10:00AM-11:15AM

A study of the technological, social and cultural events that created digital media and its
emerging cyberculture and an exploration of digital media environments and digital research
techniques.
[A] [C, P]

COMM-3103-R01: VER CENSORSHIP/FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION
Hayes, Arthur S. W 6:00PM-8:45PM

The course examines 'censorship' as an abuse of power in order to silence, marginalize, or
distort another's voice or viewpoint. We will explore the consequences of media
constructions on individual and community expressiveness.
[A] [P]

COMM-3108-R02: MOVIES & AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Instructor TBA. T 6:00PM-8:45PM

A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature films from the early
20th century to the present. Lab fee.
[A] [C]

COMM-3110-R01: PEACE, JUSTICE AND THE MEDIA
Instructor TBA. TF 2:30PM-3:45PM

This course analyzes the ways in which the media represent the issues of peace and justice.
Considering the relevance of peace and justice for democratic practices, the variety of
media depictions of such issues will be analyzed. Topics such as environmental and
economic justice, poverty and the poor, race and gender, war and peace, and media values
and ethics will be covered.
[A] [C, P]

COMM-3112-R01: MEDIA LAW
Hayes, Arthur S. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

This course is designed to introduce the communication and media studies major to the
basic issues in the field of media law. Examined here are the Constitutional principles
underlying the major Supreme Court cases that have established the parameters governing
the use of communication technologies in the country. Special focus will be given to the
various legal changes posed by new media. Juniors and Seniors only.
[A, H] [P]

COMM-3205-R01: JOURNALIST & THE LAW
Hayes, Arthur S. TF 8:30AM-9:45AM

Students should think of this course as a media law handbook for journalists. We will
examine U.S. Supreme Court and federal appeals court opinions and other materials with
the aim of developing: (1) an understanding of the fundamentals of free speech-free press
law, (2) and ability to spot when journalists' conduct may lead to lawsuits alleging libel,
violations of national security, violations of the fair administration of justice and defendants
fair trial rights and invasion of privacy, (3) an understanding of journalists’ rights and
privileges under the law, (4) the skills to read and analyze court opinions and reason as
lawyers do.
[A] [P]

COMM-3407-R01: THE SCIENCE FICTION GENRE
Strate, Lance A. W 11:30AM-2:00PM

DESCRIPTION TBA. [A][C]

COMM-3476-R01: ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDIA
Instructor TBA. T 6:00PM-8:45PM

Review of ethical principles and examination of media-related issues such as freedom of
expression, the right to privacy and the public's right to know. Juniors and Seniors Only.
[A] [P]

COMM-3681-R01: MEDIA/NATIONAL IDENTITY
Instructor TBA. T 2:30PM-5:15PM

An examination of case studies showing how national identity is inferred and organized by
mass media. Questions include: How is nationalism produced by media discourse? How are
outsiders portrayed? Who draws the boundaries between inside and outside, and how?
Texts will include television, radio, print journalism, music and films.
[H][C]

COMM-4001-R01: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE
Tueth, Michael. TF 1:00PM-2:00PM

This course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative
content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore
the ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are
offered to develop the students' appreciation of the films' artistic achievements. Rose Hill
Seniors only.
[A,R] [C]

COMM-4001-R02: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE
Wachtel, Edward. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

This course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative
content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore
the ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are
offered to develop the students' appreciation of the films' artistic achievements. Rose Hill
Seniors only.
[A,R] [C]

COMM-4004-R01: SOCIAL ETHICS IN TELECOMM.
Instructor TBA. W 11:30AM-2:00PM

This course deals with the policy decisions and ethical issues facing society in the
telecommunications age. Of special concern are the ethical issues raised by the melding
together of heretofore discrete media into vertically integrated, profit oriented,
corporations. Rose Hill Seniors only. Prereq: COMM 1010 & COMM 1011 [A] [P]

COMM-4603-R01: MEDIA & POPULAR CULTURE
Instructor TBA. TF 2:30PM-3:45PM

An exploration of various forms of contemporary popular culture and their meanings in
modern life. Theoretical approaches are discussed and various media texts such as film,
television, advertising images, popular icons, music and style are analyzed.
[A] [C]

ECON-3453-R01: LAW AND ECONOMICS
Themeli, Booi. MR 10:00AM-11:15AM

This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as
contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice'
framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention
is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is
one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship.
This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law
school. Prereq: ECON 1200
[H] [P]

ECON-3453-R02: LAW AND ECONOMICS
Themeli, Booi. MR 8:30AM-9:45AM

This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as
contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice'
framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect and genesis of laws. Attention
is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Economic analysis of law is
one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship.
This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law
school. Prereq: ECON 1200
[H] [P]

ECON-3850-R01: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
Conte, Marc. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies, from reducing air
and water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone depleting gases. However, the
environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are
increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the
key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for
sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike.
Prereq: ECON 1200
[H] [P]

ECON-3850-R02: ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
Conte, Marc. MR 4:00PM-5:15PM

Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies, from reducing air
and water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone-depleting gases. However, the
environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are
increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the
key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for
sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike.
Prereq: ECON 1200
[H] [P]

ECON-4110-R01: ETHICS & ECONOMICS
Themeli, Booi. 2:30PM-3:45PM

This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings
include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as
recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade
liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution, and economic sanction. Rose
Hill Seniors only. Prereq: ECON 1200 [H] [P]

ECON-4110-R02: ETHICS & ECONOMICS
Themeli, Booi. MR 4:00PM-5:15PM

This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings
include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as
recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade
liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution, and economic sanction. Rose
Hill Seniors only. Prereq: ECON 1200 [H] [P]

ENGL-3337-R01: CARIBBEAN ISLANDS & OCEANS
Kim, Julie.

Islands and oceans: these geographic features have defined both the history of the
Caribbean and imaginative writing about it. In this course, we will look at novels, poetry,
travel narratives, films, and other works about the Caribbean from 1492 to the present. As
we read, we will think about how authors have used the metaphors of island and ocean not
only to portray the Caribbean as a paradise but also to reflect on the effects of empire on
the region. What happened when Christopher Columbus and other early visitors to the
Caribbean met Amerindians for the first time on island shores? How did the development of
a slave trade crisscrossing the Atlantic Ocean further change what the Caribbean once had
been? Why are contemporary Caribbean writers and artists interested in rethinking ideas of
nature, environment, and place? These are some of the questions we will ask as we
examine perspectives from various disciplines, including literary studies, history, and
anthropology. [L] [C,D]

ENGL-3536-R01: SOUND IN US CULTURE HIST & LIT
Hendler, Glenn. 2:30PM-4:59PM

While people have long been interested in studying the sensory experiences of everyday life,
music popular and otherwise, and the technologies that produce and reproduce sound, only
recently has “sound studies” become a self-defined interdisciplinary field that has drawn in
scholars from art history, film studies, history, literary studies, music history, and other
fields. Over the course of the semester we will explore different ways in which such scholars
have approached the study of sound, assess the value of various keywords they have used
to interpret sound in the United States, and assemble an archive of primary sources—texts,
sites, events, figures, and objects—that help us ask new questions about U.S. culture.
[L,A][C] [Professor Hendler advises that students who previously too AMST-3000
that focused on “sound” should probably not take this course as there is a good bit
of overlap.]


ENGL 3843-R01: EXTRAORDINARY BODIES
Farland, Maria. R 2:30PM-4:59PM

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with non-normative bodies
have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will
study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social
perspectives. [L][C,D]

ENGL 3843-R01: EXTRAORDINARY BODIES
Sanchez, Rebecca. MR 4:00PM-5:15PM

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with non-normative bodies
have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will
study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social
perspectives. [L][C,D]

ENGL-3467-R01: DISOBEDIENCE IN LITERATURE
Bugg, John. RF 2:30PM-3:45PM

"Of man's first disobedience" -- so begins John Milton's epic poem, PARADISE LOST. Milton
was not alone in his having interest sparked: the concept of disobedience, in its various
permutations (literary, social, political, psychological, religious) has energized a wide variety
of literary works. One might say that without some form of disobedience there could be no
storytelling. Some of the questions that will shape our explorations in this course include:
when is disobedience herioc, and when is it destructive or regrettable? What is the
difference between disobeying your family and disobeying the law? Can an obedient
character be interesting? How are the different modes of authority (religious, juridical,
familial, played off against one another in order to license behavior? Using disobedience as
our master rubric, we will follow important continuities and innovative changes in literary
history across the past three centuries. [L] [C]

ENGL-3662-R01: POSTWAR U.S. LITERATURE & CULTURE
Collins, Cornelius. TF 2:30PM-3:45PM

This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of
the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the
Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the
counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war
movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions
of history, identity, and responsibility.
[L] [C]

ENGL-3662-R02: POSTWAR U.S. LITERATURE & CULTURE
Collins, Cornelius. TR 5:30PM-6:45PM

This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of
the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the
Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the
counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war
movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions
of history, identity, and responsibility.
[L] [C]

ENGL-3930-R01: INTRO TO GAY & LESBIAN LIT
McEleney, Corey. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

Description TBA. [L][C,D]

HIST-3653-R01: GENDER IN EARLY AMERICA
Crane, Elaine. MR 10:00AM-11:15AM

Consideration of the roles of women and men from the 17th century into the 1840s, and the
attitudes that shaped those roles in American society. The course will explore transatlantic
influences and the interchange of European, Native American, and African American values.
[H] [D, P]

HIST-3791-R01: AFRICAN-AMERICAN HIST I
Anderson, Robert. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

An examination of the black experience in the U.S. from Reconstruction to the present.
Subjects covered will be the origins of segregation, the Civil Rights movement, African
American nationalism, and African American contributions to American literature, music,
sports, and scholarship. Special attention will be given to the role of economic forces in
shaping African American life, and the importance of gender issues in the African American
experience. [H] [D, P]

HIST-3862-R01: HISTORY OF NEW YORK CITY (Advanced History Core)
Soyer, Daniel. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

Description TBA. [H] [C, P]

HIST-3904-R01: AMERICAN ECONOMIC HISTORY
Himmelberg, Robert. MR 10:00AM-11:15AM

American economic development and growth, with attention both to market forces and
economic policy and the connection and interplay between them, from the colonial era to
the present. To what extent did governmental policies influence the impact of market forces
in the history of economic development and to what extent did economic interests and
considerations determine the classic events of American history, such as the Revolution, the
Civil War, Imperialism and the Cold War? Course imparts a sophisticated understanding of
the causes of economic growth and of economic events and circumstances such as
depressions, stock market fluctuations, inflation, wealth and income distribution and similar
phenomena, items that exert so powerful an influence upon political and social historical
development. Requirements include a mid-term and final and occasional brief written
assignments based on assigned readings of articles in the field.
[H] [P]

HIST-3950-R01: LATINO HISTORY
Acosta, Salvador. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on
the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, sexuality, and citizenship. Specific
topics include: United States colonial expansion and its effects on the population of Latin
America; Mexican-Americans, and the making of the West; colonialism and the Puerto Rican
Diaspora; Caribbean revolutions and the Cuban-American community; and globalization and
recent Latina/o migrations (Dominicans, Colombians).
[H] [D, P]

HIST-3950-R02: LATINO HISTORY
Acosta, Salvador. TF 1:00PM-2:15PM

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on
the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, sexuality, and citizenship. Specific
topics include: United States colonial expansion and its effects on the population of Latin
America; Mexican-Americans, and the making of the West; colonialism and the Puerto Rican
Page 8 of 12
Diaspora; Caribbean revolutions and the Cuban-American community; and globalization and
recent Latina/o migrations (Dominicans, Colombians).
[H] [D, P]

HIST-4921-R01: SEM: RACE SEX & COLONIALISM
Ray, Carina. W 9:30AM-11:50AM

This EP4 Senior Values Seminar will provide you with the opportunity to study and analyze
the similarities and differences that characterize histories of interracial sexual relations as
they have unfolded in different political, social, economic, and legal contexts; time periods;
geographic locations; and racial and gendered configurations. Each week we will focus on a
different monograph that substantively deals with a historical case study of interracial
sexual relations in areas as diverse as colonial Indonesia, the Great Lakes Region, India,
and Francophone Africa. Complementing these readings will be a number of foundational
texts on race, sex, and colonialism. Critical to our endeavor will be probing a range of
ethical and moral questions about the relationships between race and sex, on one hand, and
the exercise of colonial power, on the other. [H][D]

MUSC-2014-R01: JAZZ, A HISTORY IN SOUND
Stempel, Larry. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

This course studies jazz historically from the turn of the twentieth century to the present,
through both the shifting relations between black and white cultures in America, and the
changes in musical tastes and practices over time. It considers the development of New
Orleans, Swing, bebop, modal, fusion, and contemporary jazz styles, with special attention
to the contributions of Armstrong, Ellington, Parker, Davis and Coltrane.
[A] [C]

POSC-3122-R01: RELIGION & AMERICAN POLITICS
McDermott, Monika. Peppard, Michael. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

This interdisciplinary seminar explores the nexus of religion and American public life. After
treating topics related to electoral politics (e.g. candidate religion, voter religion, "value
voters," religious rhetoric), students will then engage a series of "hot topics" that
encompass (and often combine) both religious and political discourse. The goal is to provide
students with two alternative, yet complementary methods of analyzing the intersection of
religion and American politics- one from a political science perspective and one from a
theological perspective. [R][P]

POSC-3131-R01: POLITICS URBAN HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT (Advanced Social
Science Core / Eloquentia Perfecta 3)
Berg, Bruce. MR 10:00AM-11:15AM

This course will examine the intersection of urban life, individual and community health and
public policy. It will examine the evolution of urban public problems, the urban environment
and the role and responsibility of society and the political system to respond to individual
and health issues in urban settings. Rose Hill Sophomores and Juniors only.
[H] [P]

POSC-3210-R01: CIVIL RIGHTS & LIBERTIES
INSTRUCTOR & TIME TBA.

A casebook analysis of Supreme Court decisions on civil rights and civil liberties. Topics
include freedom of speech and religion, the right to privacy, gender and racial equality, the
death penalty, and protections against unreasonable searches and seizures.

POSC-3213-R01: INTEREST GROUP POLITICS
Berg, Bruce. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

An examination of pressure groups and their role in the political process. Special attention
will be paid to the origins of groups, who joins and who does not and how groups affect
their own members.
[H] [P]

PSYC-3600-R01: MULTICULTURAL ISSUES
Instructor TBA. TF 8:30AM-9:45AM

The focus of this course is the multicultural applicability of scientific and professional
psychology. Traditional psychological theories, scientific psychology, psychological tests,
and the practice of psychology will be examined and critiqued from cultural and sociohistorical
perspectives. Contemporary psychological theories and research specific to men,
women, gay men, lesbians, and race/ethnicity will be reviewed. Prereq: PSYC 1000 or PSYC
1200
[H] [D]

PSYC-4340-R01: LAW & PSYCHOLOGY
Instructor TBA. MR 1:00PM-2:15PM

An introduction to (a) the issues relevant to understanding human behavior from the
perspective of law and psychology and (b) the contributions of psychology as a behavioral
science to such legal issues as legal evidence, juries, and criminal and civil
responsibility. Rose Hill Seniors only. Class will meet in a Psychology Department Seminar
Room.
[H] [P]

SOCI-2420-R01: SOCIAL PROBLEMS OF RACE AND ETHNICITY (Pluralism)
Lee, Isabelle. TF 2:30PM-3:45PM

This course explores the historical and contemporary issues surrounding the impact that
race and ethnicity have in society. Students will examine how racial and ethnic criteria often
guide important economic, political, and social decisions that affect access to resources by
various groups and which usually have major consequences for the individual. [H] [D, P]
(Fulfils the American Pluralism requirement in the Core)

SOCI-2847-R01: THE 60s: SEX, DRUGS, ROCK & ROLL
Wormser, Richard. T 2:30PM-5:15PM

During the tumultuous 1960s, American society was marked by a number of political, social
and cultural movements led by youth. They struggled for freedom on many levels. African
Americans struggled against the oppression of racial segregation of the South in the Civil
Rights Movement: young people sought sexual freedom and the right to experiment with
drugs; musicians broke away from the restraints of traditional pop singing (Frank Sinatra,
Nat “King” Cole, Pat Boone) and folk songs and created the world of rock and roll; politically
minded youth attacked the traditional institutions of political and economic power by
protesting against the war in Vietnam; women challenged traditional male attitudes that
confined them to domesticity or inferior status in the work place and in society; gays
organized against the repressive laws and prejudices against homosexuality. Course shows
how SOCIAL CHANGE TAKES PLACE THROUGH SOCIAL ACTION and how many of the beliefs
and attitudes of today’s youth are connected to the momentous social changes of the 1960s
[H] [D, P, C]

SOCI-2925-R01: MEDIA CRIME SEX VIOLENCE
Sweet, Kerry. TF 8:30AM-9:45AM

An analysis of mass media reporting, presentation and explanation.
[A, H] [P]

SOCI-3255-R01: SOCIOLOGY OF MEDIA
Yorukoglu, Ilgin. MR 8:30AM-9:45AM

This course examines the role of the media, particularly the news media, as a dominant
institution in a contemporary democratic society. Students will examine news media content,
the structure of news media organizations, and the relationship of news media organizations
to other dominant institutions. The materials used for examination will be a variety of
contemporary case studies.
[A, H] [P]

SOCI-3300-R01: "RACE" AND "MIXED RACE"
Miyawaki, Michael. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

The origins of "race," its historic role and social construction are examined. Ancient and
modern day ideas are explored. Contrasts between the United States and Latin American
conceptions of "race" and "mixed race" are analyzed. Future implications are
discussed.
[H] [D, P]

SOCI-3405-R01: GENDER, RACE, CLASS
Kurti, Zhandarka. MR 5:30PM-6:45PM

This course examines the relationship between gender, race, and class as overlapping
dimensions of social experience in the U.S. Drawing on a variety of sources, including
theoretical, ethnographic, and literary writings, each of these dimensions is considered as
part of a complex approach to social problems.
[H] [D, P]

SOCI-3418-R01: CONTEMPORARY IMMIGRATION GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES
(Eloquentia Perfecta 3)
Gilbertson, Greta. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

Over the last four decades, immigration has again transformed the US. It is also producing
significant changes in other countries, from the European nations that used to send their
citizens to the US more than a century ago, to oil-rich Middle Eastern states and developing
nations. Why do people migrate across international borders? Can states control migration,
especially “unwanted” migrants? Course begins with these questions, and examines the
policies that let some people in, while keeping others out. Considers incorporation, the
process by which foreign “outsiders” become integrated in their new home. Are immigrants
and their children becoming part of the U.S. mainstream? What is the mainstream? The
arrival of newcomers also affects the cultural, economic, political and social dynamics of the
countries and communities that receive them. How do sociologists evaluate and theorize
immigrant integration? Course ends by looking at topical debates around membership,
including citizenship. The large-scale movement of people raises questions about belonging,
nationality and social cohesion. Course is centered on the U.S. case, but we consider other
nations and the lessons they provide. Rose Hill Sophomores and Juniors only. [H][D]

SOCI-3456-R01: MODERN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
Bush, Evelyn. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

Social movements in 20th-century America have been vehicles of political protest, social
change, and sometimes also resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social
movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and
popular culture? In addition to a general and theoretical assessment of social movements,
this course introduces students to particular movements that have formed over such issues
as alcohol consumption, racism, war, and abortion.
[H] [D, P]

SOCI-3456-R02: MODERN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
Bush, Evelyn. TF 10:00AM-11:15AM

Social movements in 20th-century America have been vehicles of political protest, social
change, and sometimes also resistance to change. Under what circumstances are social
movements successful and what has been their impact on American institutional life and
popular culture? In addition to a general and theoretical assessment of social movements,
this course introduces students to particular movements that have formed over such issues
as alcohol consumption, racism, war, and abortion.
[H] [D, P]

SOCI-3506-R01: DIVERSITY IN AMERICAN FAMILIES
Avishai-Bentovim, Orit. W 11:30AM-2:15PM

In this course students will learn the basics of qualitative social science research. Students
will brainstorm a project, set research goals, find relevant literature, learn how to collect
and analyze data, and observe research ethics. During the semester students will work on
a project of their choosing that will culminate in an empirically based final paper. Students
planning to write a thesis or conduct an independent research project based on qualitative
research will find this course particularly helpful.
[H] [D]

SOCI-3601-R01: URBAN POVERTY
Rhomberg, Christopher. MR 11:30AM-12:45PM

DESCRIPTION TBA. This course deals with contemporary issues and problems in cities, with
a special focus on residential segregation and urban poverty. [H] [P]

SOCI-3603-R01: URBAN AMERICA
Rhomberg, Christopher. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

This course offers an introduction to urban sociology and to the study of American urban
society. Particular attention will be paid to New York City. Topics include the rise of “global”
cities like New York, metropolitan growth and inequality, urban policy, and politics, patterns
of class, racial, and ethnic group formation, and local community organization.
[H] [P]

SOCI-3714-R01: TERRORISM AND SOCIETY
Sweet, Kerry. TF 10:00AM-11:15AM

This course examines the history and societal causes of terrorism in its many forms, and the
state's and society's counter-terrorist response. Among issues to be examined are the
nature of terrorist ideology and the source of support for, and opposition to, terrorism
among the people that terrorists claim to represent. Other issues to be examined are
prevention preparedness and emergency responses to terrorist attacks, and political, civil,
and human rights challenges faced by countries dealing with terrorism in the 21st
century.
[H] [P]

SOCI-4961-R01: URBAN ISSUES & POLICIES
Rosenbaum, Emily. T 2:30PM-5:15PM

This course examines inequality in the urban housing market, with a focus on differential
access to housing/neighborhoods and the social and economic opportunities embedded in
residential location. Among the key topics are segregation (its causes and consequences),
affordability, and the policies that have been implemented to resolve residential inequalities
and their correlates. All readings should be done prior to class, as class will consist of
lecture and discussion. [H] [D, P]

SOCI-4970-R01: COMM SERVICE/SOC ACTION (Eloquentia Perfecta 4)
Rodriguez, Orlando. MR 4:00PM-5:15PM

Community Service Required.
This course will deepen students understanding of the meaning of community service and
social action in America and challenge them to confront the moral issues and social
commitments necessary to be members of a just democratic society. [H] [D, P]

THEO-3375-R01: AMERICAN RELIGIOUS TEXTS
Rober, Daniel. TF 8:30AM-9:45AM

This course will analyze important texts and thinkers in American religion from the Colonial
period to the present. It will engage various religious traditions, including Christianity,
Judaism, Islam, and others. Thinkers and texts to be treated include Bartolomé de las
Casas, Jonathan Edwards, the Book of Mormon, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Martin Luther King,
Jr., Dorothy Day, and Thomas Merton. [R][C,P]

THEO-3960-R01: RELIGION & RACE IN THE US
Hill Fletcher, Jeannine. W 11:30AM-1:59PM

This course explores the ways religion and race function in the American landscape as
sources of both belonging and discrimination. By examining historical and contemporary
sources, we will examine how theological discourses and religious communities have been
sites of both racism and race-justice. Together we will consider how the intersection of race
and religion are important aspects of academic study, and how this study might enhance
our social awareness, encourage our civic engagement, and challenge us in personal
responsibility. [R][D,P]

THEO-4025-R01: MARRIAGE IN 21ST CENTURY
Hinze, Christine. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

This course will explore the various dynamics of marriage, namely intimate relationships,
sexuality, family life, relationship between families and the greater society, and the
sacramental meaning of married life. At the core of this course is the quest to understand
how Christianity may enlighten our understanding of marriage and family life. [R][C,P]

WMST-3010-R01: FEMINIST THEO IN INTER-CULT
INSTRUCTOR AND TIME TBA.

An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of
gender, sexuality, class,race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-
Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective. [L] [C, D, P]

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