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Spring 2014 American Studies Courses at Lincoln Center









Spring 2014 American Studies Courses at Lincoln Center

ANTH-3180-L01: CULTURES OF NEW YORK CITY
Fader, Ayla. TF 1:00PM-2:15PM

Description TBA. [H] [C, D]

ANTH-3725-L01: CULTURE & CULTURE CHANGE
Sawalha, Aseel. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

Selected issues in the relationship of human behavior and culture. Issues dealt with in this
course include the concept of culture, culture and the individual, culture contact, and culture
change. [H][P]

COMM-2525-L01: DIGITAL MEDIA & CYBERCULTURE
Instructor TBA. M 2:30PM-5:15PM

A study of the technological, social, and cultural aspects of digital media and its emerging
cyberculture and an exploration of digital media environments and digital research
techniques. [A][C, P]

COMM-3108-L01: MOVIES & AMERICAN EXPERIENCE
Brennan, Nathaniel. T 11:30AM-2:15PM

A study of the American character as portrayed in American feature film from the early 20th
century to the present. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement of the core curriculum.
Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. [A][C]

COMM-3307-L01: SOCIAL MEDIA
Marwick, Alice. MR 10:00AM-11:15AM

An introduction to computer-mediated communication, electronic networking, online
Internet communication and emerging interactive social contexts, such as MUDS, Chat,
Discussion Lists and the World Wide Web. This course includes computer-based
observations and hands-on projects. Computer literacy not presumed. [A][C]

COMM-3309-L01: CHILDREN AND MEDIA
Jackaway, Gwenyth. MW 10:00AM-11:15AM

This course is designed to introduce you to the study of Children and Media. At least since
Plato called for the banishment of the poets from the Republic to shield the young from
‘harmful’ ideas, adults have been wondering and worrying about the impact of mediated
communication on children. In recent centuries, the emergence of new communication
technologies has been consistently accompanied by calls for censorship and regulation as
frightened parents worried about the impact of these new media on their children. What do
we actually know about how the mass media impact the developing brain? Despite nearly a
century of experimental research, methodological, ethical and philosophical challenges of
studying children and media have left scholars with many questions and few clear answers.
[A] [C, P]

COMM-3310-L01: TV COMEDY & AMERICAN VALUES
Tueth, Michael. MW 11:30AM-12:45PM

An examination of the major genres of American television comedy and their relationship to
American culture. The influence of social, artistic and commercial factors on comic patterns
and techniques are considered. [A] [C]

COMM-3332-L01: UNDERSTANDING TELEVISION
Williams, Karen. R 2:30PM-5:15PM

Critical Analysis of television as a storytelling medium. Study of current approaches to
television narrative and style. Screenings and discussion of TV series and news
programming. [A] [P]

COMM-3571-POPULAR MUSIC AS COMMUNITY
McCourt, Thomas. W 8:30AM-11:00AM

This class will examine the ways in which popular music influences (and is influenced by)
economics, politics, culture, and society. The course requires no formal musical knowledge,
but it does require a great deal of passion and commitment. Given the sprawling nature of
popular music, we cannot hope to be all-inclusive. Therefore, we will focus on the last 50
years of American and English popular music (although student input from other areas is
welcome. [A] [C] Juniors and Seniors only.

COMM-4001-L01: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE
Tueth, Michael. MW 1:00PM-2:15PM

This course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative
content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore
the ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are
offered to develop the students' appreciation of the films' artistic achievements. Rose Hill
Seniors only. [A,R] [C]

COMM-4001-L01: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE
Auster, Albert. T 2:30PM-5:15PM

This course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative
content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore
the ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are
offered to develop the students' appreciation of the films' artistic achievements. Rose Hill
Seniors only. [A,R] [C]

COMM-4001-L01: FILMS OF MORAL STRUGGLE
High, Michael. TF 10:00AM-11:15AM

This course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative
content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore
the ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are
offered to develop the students' appreciation of the films' artistic achievements. Rose Hill
Seniors only. [A,R] [C]

DANC-2010-L01: BLACK TRAD IN AMER DANCE
Instructor TBA. T 11:30AM-2:15PM

DESCRIPTION TBA. [A] [C, D]

ECON-4110-L01: ETHICS & ECONOMICS
Collins, Sean. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

This course examines how ethical considerations enter into economic decisions. Readings
include writings by moral philosophers and the founders of economic thought as well as
recent research on ethical issues. Topics for discussion may include childcare, trade
liberalization, welfare reform, healthcare, poverty, pollution, and economic sanction. [H]
[P].

ENGL-3013-L01: NOVEL, SHE WROTE
Tyler, Dennis. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

DESCRIPTION TBA. [A] [C]

ENGL-3843-L01: EXTRAORDINARY BODIES
Hoffman, Anne. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with non-normative bodies
have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will
study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social
perspectives. [A] [P, C]

HIST-3013 L01: HIST OF AMERICAN FOOD
Stoll, Steven. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

DESCRIPTION TBA. [H] [C]

HIST-3655-L01: WITCHCRAFT IN COLONIAL AMERICA
Panetta, Roger. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

DESCRIPTION TBA. [R, H] [P]

HIST-3772-L01: HUDSON RIVER (ICC, EP3)
Panetta, Roger. W 8:30AM-11:00AM

Rivers are the central geographical markers for the growth of civilization. Examination of the
formative role of the Hudson in American economic development and the shaping of cultural
identity. The ways in which the history of Hudson mirrors our relationship with nature and is
central to the emergence of the modern environmental movement will also be examined.
[H] [C]

HIST-3775-L01: THE EARLY REPUBLIC
Ben-Atar, Doron. MW 1:00PM-2:15PM

The course studies the birth of American democracy and capitalism from the course studies
to the birth of American democracy and capitalism from the revolution to the age of
Jackson. [H] [P]

HIST-3831-L01: RISE OF AMERICAN SUBURB (Core ICC)
Panetta, Roger. MR 4:00PM-5:15PM

DESCRIPTION TBA. [H] [C]

LALS-2005-L01: AMERICAN PLURALISM
Goldberg, Barry. TF 2:30PM-3:45PM

The aim of the course is to provide a critical historical perspective on the changing political
economy, ideology, and literature of race and ethnicity in the United States. It cannot tell
you how to feel or act. (Of course, some of us may begin to reconsider our “American,”
“ethnic,” or “racial” identities.) It will not provide a simple ethical guide or policy agenda.
(Of course, some of us may reassess our political commitments and what it means to “do
the right thing.”) It can provide us with a historical purchase point from which we can begin
to reassess our domain assumptions about the development and significance of race and
ethnicity in American life – past, present, and future. Perhaps most important, we can begin
to have civil (informed, respectful, honest) interethnic discussions (among ourselves and
with the authors we read). [H] [D]

MLAL-3001-L01: IT AMER EXPERIENCE: LIT & FILM
Perricone, Joseph. MR 4:00PM-5:15PM

Description TBA. [A] [C]

POSC-3121-L01: NEW YORK CITY POLITICS
Toulouse, Christopher. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

An analysis of the New York City political system. Attention will be paid to the participants in
New York City government and politics, the factors that influence policy making in New York
City, as well as public policies produced by that system. [H] [P]

POSC-4106-L01: SEM: PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS
Greer, Christina. T 2:30PM-5:15PM

This course will explore the complexities of presidential elections in the United States.
Attention will be devoted to the nomination and general election phases of the process. Few
aspects of the American electoral process have experienced as much change as the
presidential nomination process over the course of the past few decades. Developments in
presidential primaries, campaign finance and nominating conventions have dramatically
altered the backdrop against which presidential candidates pursue the nomination. In
general election contests, presidential campaigns have honed their targeting,
communications and mobilization strategies considerably. This course will examine these
developments and offer students an in-depth view of the politics of contemporary
presidential elections. [H] [P]

PSYC-3600-L01: MULTICULTURAL ISSUES
Instructor TBA. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

The focus of this course is the multicultural applicability of scientific and professional
psychology. Traditional psychological theories, scientific psychology, psychological tests,
and the practice of psychology will be examined and critiqued from cultural and sociohistorical
perspectives. Contemporary psychological theories and research specific to men,
women, gay men, lesbians, and race/ethnicity will be reviewed. [H] [D]

SOCI-3017-L01 INEQUALITY IN AMERICA
Gautney, Heather. TF 11:30AM-12:45PM

This course will involve studying the historical and contemporary factors that create and
maintain social and political inequality in the U.S and beyond. While the course focuses
specifically on the U.S., it will also consider the broader context of uneven development
around the globe. Students will become familiar with empirical studies, as well as classical
and contemporary sociological theories related to class, race, and gender-based inequality.
They will also develop analytical tools for understanding inequality in terms of larger power
dynamics in contemporary society, especially in light of recent social movements that have
elevated these issues to the forefront of our national consciousness. [H] [P, D]

SOCI-3720-L01: MASS INCARCERATION
Flavin, Jeanne. W 8:30AM-11:00AM

This course presents a critical look at the history, nature, and function of the United States
corrections system, with an emphasis on the adult prison system. We will focus on how the
prison community shapes the lives of staff, prisoners, and their families; how the prison
community influences prisoners' readjustment to life on the outside; and, finally, what
officials can do to make the prison a more civilized and civilizing institution. [H] [P]

SPAN 3582: NEW YORK IN LATINO LITERATURE AND FILM
Cruz-Malave, Arnaldo. MR 10:00AM-11:15AM.

New York as represented and imagined by Spanish and Latin American immigrant and exile
writers and by native Latino New Yorkers through literary texts (memoirs, urban chronicles,
short fiction, poetry, and novels), film, and performance art. New York as a metaphor for
modernity and the tension between artistic creation and the market, as a cosmopolitan
center for the Spanish, Latin American and Latino avant-gardes, and as a new home for
hybrid and transnational communities and neighborhoods. To include writers such as Martí,
Lorca, Julia de Burgos, Arenas, González, Thomas, Piñero, Pietri, Alvarez, Díaz, Leguizamo
and Troyano. (Applies to Spanish, LALS, Comp Lit and American Studies majors. A
Pluralism Course.) [A] [D]

THEO-3375-L01: AMERICAN RELIGIOUS TEXTS
Seitz, John. MR 10:00AM-11:15AM

A critical and contextual reading of classical texts in American Religions History, focusing on
diverse traditions and the crucial importance of religious perspectives to American culture,
society, and self understanding. [R][C]

THEO-3375-L01: AMERICAN RELIGIOUS TEXTS
Seitz, John. MR 2:30PM-3:45PM

A critical and contextual reading of classical texts in American Religions History, focusing on
diverse traditions and the crucial importance of religious perspectives to American culture,
society, and self understanding. [R][C]

WMST-3010-L01: FEMINIST THEO IN INTER-CULT (PLURALISM)
Hoffman, Anne. MR 4:00PM-5:15PM

An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of
gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-
Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective. [L] [D, P]

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