Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 



Fall 2011

LC Course Offerings  |  LC Cross-Listed Courses  |  RH Course Offerings  |  RH Cross-Listed Courses

Please note that changes may occur. Make sure to view the course listings in Banner for updates or changes, prerequisites and lab fees, and consult your Comp Lit advisor for feedback on your course selection.


Lincoln Center Course Offerings

COLI 2000-L01
– Texts and Contexts: Women and Independence in Africa  (3 credits)
F. Mustafa    MW 1:00-2:15

An examination of gender, African women's literature and their place in processes of liberation, decolonization, and national independence on the continent. Authors may include: Mariama Ba, Sadaawi, Bessie Head, Marks, Dangarembga, and Adiche. Fulfills the core requirement in Literature in English, the distributive requirement in Eloquentia perfecta (EP2), and the Global Studies requirement.

COLI 3215-L01 – The War Novel  (4 credits)
F. Harris      TF 11:30-12:45
This course focuses on how the 20th-century war novel translates the experience of war into fiction (World War I and II, and the Vietnam War). Readings may include Hemingway, Remarque,
Céline, Claude Simon, Tim O'Brien.

Lincoln Center Cross-listed Courses

AFAM 3693-L01
– Contemporary African Literatures  (4 credits)
F. Mustafa
     MW 11:30-12:45
Contemporary works from around the continant including a selection of anglophone literatures of South, West and East Africa and translations into English of Portuguese, French, Arabic and Kiswahili. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement.

ARHI 4560-L01 – Modernism in Art and Literature  (4 credits)
J. Isaak
     W 11:30-2:10
An interdisciplinary study of the connection between modern art and literature. Fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capsone requirement.

COMM 2471-L01
– Introduction to Film  (4 credits)
J. Clark
     TF 1:00-2:15
Examination of the aesthetics of film, its formal language and structure. Screening and analysis of representative films. Study of film theory and criticism. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite to other film courses.

COMM 3414-L01
– Asian Film  (4 credits)
N. Kim     T 2:30-5:15

This course explores the major works of Asian Film, including the work of Satyajit Ray, the post-Maoist films of Chen Kaige and Zhang Yimou and the Japanese masterworks of Kenji Mizoguchi Yasujiro Ozu and Akira Kurosawa.

COMM 4001-L01 – Films of Moral Struggle  (4 credits)
A. Auster      T 2:30-5:15

This course will survey both American and World Cinema for their approaches to moral and ethical issues. It will examine how these issues are presented to an audience and how these issues are resolved, or perhaps even left ambiguous or unresolved. It will also examine how these films' moral issues are framed by the filmmakers in various countries and cultures. Fulfills the senior Values requirement – open to LC students only.

COMM 4001-L01 – Films of Moral Struggle  (4 credits)
M. Tueth     MW 1:00-2:15

This course attempts to study how human values and moral choices are explored through both the narrative content and technique of the film medium. Philosophical and theological perspectives are brought to bear on various ethical questions which each film presents, while numerous critical approaches are employed to develop the students' appreciation of each film's technical aspects. The majority of the films studied are distinguished achievements in the American film canon, such as Casablanca, On the Waterfront, The Graduate, The Shawshank Redemption, Mystic River, American Beauty, and others. Fulfills the senior Values requirement – open to LC students only.

ENGL 3045-L01 – Theory for English Majors  (4 credits)
L. Kramer      MW 1:00-2:15

This course introduces the student to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of this course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself. Students will engage with a range of critical, theoretical,and social issues shapingthe field of literary studies today. English and Comparative Literature majors/minors only. May be substituted for COLI 3000 - Theories of Comparative Literature.

ENGL 3206-L01 – Shakespeare  (4 credits)
H. Dubrow      MR 2:30-3:45

Poetry and plays studied in relation to Renaissance and 20th-century concerns and ideologies. Emphasis on Shakespeare and his works read and constructed in regard to power, class, gender and literary aesthetics.

ENGL 3609-L01 – Feminism and American Poetry  (4 credits)
E. Frost     MR 4:00-5:15
This course addresses contemporary American womens' poetry and its relationship to recent feminist thought, specifically during and since "second-wave" feminism (roughly 1968 to the present). What role has poetry played in the arena of feminist politics? How do women writers construct varying identities through poetic language, exploring differences of race, ethnicity, physical disability, and sexual orientation? How might we apply recent feminist theories of language and identity to recent women poets? In response to such questions, we will read feminist theory in relation to poetry, and poetry in dialogue with feminist theory.

ENGL 4137-L01
– Hysteria, Sexuality and the Unconscious  (4 credits)  [See also HIST 4625-L01]
A. Hoffman     MR 2:30-3:45
The seminar explores issues raised by hysteria, sexuality and the unconscious in turn of the twentieth-century western culture-topics that cross disciplinary boundaries. Fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement.

FREN 3300-L01 – The Enlightenment  (4 credits)
Instructor TBA    MR 2:30-3:45

The French Enlightenment and the Ancien Régime through its literature, art, and thought. Conducted in French.

HIST 3629-L01
– Maritime Cities  (4 credits)
R. Wakeman
    MR 2:30-3:45
History of maritime cities from premodern to contemporary age. Focus is on global economic systems and trade networks, evolution of maritime society and culture, the built environment. Looks at relationship between cities and the sea from cultural and environmental standpoint.

HIST 4625-L01 Hysteria, Sexuality and the Unconscious  (4 credits)  [See also ENGL 4137-L01]
D. Ben-Atar     MR 2:30-3:45
The seminar explores issues raised by hysteria, sexuality and the unconscious in turn of the twentieth-century western culture-topics that cross disciplinary boundaries. Fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement.

ITAL 3910-L01 – Italy Today  (4 credits)
J. Perricone     MR 4:00-5:15
A voyage through contemporary Italy. readings and class discussions will focus on the political system and the socio-economic development since World War II, the Mafia, and the role of women. Authors and filmmakers may include Marta Boneschi, Roberto Saviano, Giovanni Floris, Dacia maraini, Alberto Moravia, Gianni Amelio among others. Conducted in Italian.


MLAL 3822-L01 – The Arabian Nights  (4 credits)
Q. Al-Attabi     TF 11:30-12:45
This course examines the cycle of stories known as the Arabian Nights or 1001 Nights. In the first half of the course we will read some of the major tale cycles and study the relevant historical and cultural contexts. In the second half of the course we will consider a number of adaptations
novels, plays, and filmsthat have been inspired by the Arabian Nights. Conducted in English. Readings in English and English translation.

POSC
3520-L01 – Mideast and the World  (4 credits)
J. Entelis     T 2:30-5:15

An introduction to the international politics of the Middle East and North Africa utilizing a subordinate system analysis approach. Thematic topics include regional conflicts, Arab-Israeli confrontation and its resolution, the Palestinianquestion, role of the superpowers, oil diplomacy, territorial and frontier disputes. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement.

SPAN 3510-L01 – Spain at War  (4 credits)
C. Kasten      TF 10:00-11:15

This course will explore the main political and social conflicts in Spanish history from early modern times to the 20th century and its impact on literature and art. Works by Cervantes, Goya, and Picasso, among many others, will be analyzed and discussed. Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 3701-L01 – Spanish-American Women Writers (4 credits)
C. Vich     MR 2:30-3:45
Texts by Spanish-American women writers from the Colonial period to the present. Issues of female writing and representation. Evaluation of the status of writing as a woman in recent critical theory. Authors may include: Sor Juana, Mistral, Bombal, Castellanos, Poniatowska, Ferre, and Allende. Conducted in Spanish. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement.

SPAN 3730-L01 – Writing Violence: Peru 1980-2000 (4 credits)
C. Vich     MR 10:00-11:15
In this course we will study the different representations of violence in Peruvian narrative, poetry and film whose main subject was the armed conflict during the 1980's and 90's between the Peruvian state and subversive groups (Shining Path and MRTA). Most reading will be literary but the course has a strong interdisciplinary nature since a thorough study of historical, sociological and anthropological texts related to this period of Peruvian history and culture will be included. Conducted in Spanish. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement
.

WMST 3020-L01 – Histories and Texts  (4 credits)
N. Fermon      T 2:30-5:15
Ahistorical perspective on the political, socio-economic, and philosophical dimensions of women's lives and the construction of gender, including critical analysis of women's writings and women's movements. The course will consider class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and age. The particular areas of emphasis will vary according to the instructor's specializations. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.

Rose Hill Course Offerings

COLI 4204-R01 – Conrad and the Future of English  (4 credits)
C. GoGwilt
    W 11:30-2:00
A study of works by Joseph Conrad and their relevance for the changing landscape of English literature within the comparative linguistic, literary, and cultural context of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Besides select works of Conrad (including Almayer’s Folly, Heart of Darkness, Lord Jim, Nostromo, The Secret Agent, and Under Western Eyes), other works to be studies may include: Ngugi wa Thiong’ o, A Grain of Wheat, V.S. Naipaul, A Bend in the River, Tayeb Salih, Season of Migration to the North, Nuruddin Farah, Maps, Jessica Hagedorn, Dream Jungle, Pramoedya Ananta Toer, This Earth of Mankind. Capstone seminar for Comparative Literature majors.

Rose Hill Cross-listed Courses

COMM 2471-R01
– Intro to Film  (4 credits)
M. Hardenbergh     TF 1:00-2:15
Examination of the aesthetics of film, its formal language and structure. Screening and analysis of representative films. Study of film theory and criticism. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite to other film courses.

COMM 4001-R01 – Films of Moral Struggle  (4 credits)
M. Tueth      TF 2:30-3:45

This course attempts to study how human values and moral choices are explored through both the narrative content and technique of the film medium. Philosophical and theological perspectives are brought to bear on various ethical questions which each film presents, while numerous critical approaches are employed to develop the students' appreciation of each film's technical aspects. The majority of the films studied are distinguished achievements in the American film canon, such as Casablanca, On the Waterfront, The Graduate, The Shawshank Redemption, Mystic River, American Beauty, and others. Fulfills the senior Values requirement – open to RH students only.

ENGL 3045-R01 – Theory for English Majors  (4 credits)
M. Gold      TF 10:00-11:15

This course introduces the student to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of this course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself. Students will engage with a range of critical, theoretical,and social issues shapingthe field of literary studies today. English and Comparative Literature majors/minors only. May be substituted for COLI 3000 - Theories of Comparative Literature.

ENGL 3099-R01 – Translating Literature? Why? How?  (4 credits)
C. Brandt      MR 10:00-11:15

What does it take to translate a poem or story well? How be true to the original and carry over its aesthetic excitement as well as its meaning? A course for those with the basic knowledge of a language other than English.

ENGL 3206-R01 – Shakespeare  (4 credits)
S. Sherman      W 8:30-11:00

Poetry and plays studied in relation to Renaissance and 20th-century concerns and ideologies. Emphasis on Shakespeare and his works read and constructed in regard to power, class, gender and literary aesthetics.

ENGL 3665-R01 – Coming of Age, Asian American  (4 credits)
J. Kim      TF 4:00-5:15

In this course we will examine a variety of ways in which contemporary Asian-American authors have responded to the difficulty of growing up as outsiders.

ENGL 3841-R01 – Contemporary Fiction  (4 credits)
D. Contreras     TF 11:30-12:45

What makes comtemporary fiction "contemporary"? How does it differ from pre-World War II fiction or so-called "modernist" writing? This course explores the fundamental transformation of the way contemporaries see the world, dealing with writers as diverse as Kundera, Nabokov, Philip Roth, Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, Joan Didion, Marquez, Mishma, Robbe-Grillet, Patrick Suskind, Calvino and Vonnegut.


FREN 3460-R01 – Postcolonial Representations  (4 credits)
L. Schreier      MR 11:30-12:45

This course examines the cultural production of the colonial age and its influence on post-colonial aesthetics and rhetoric. We will devote particular attention to colonial culture’s complex systems of representation and ask how the heirs of colonialism must continually re-negotiate it. In addition to nineteenth- and twentieth-century novels, plays, movies, paintings and photographs, we will consider products of consumer culture such as plates, toys, commercials and postcards. Conducted in French.

GREK 3012-R01
– Plato: Socratic Dialogues  (4 credits)
M. McGowan     TF 2:30-3:45

A study of the early Socratic dialogues; elected passages from: Laches, Lysis, (Charmides), Meno, Gorgias, (Protagoras), Euthyphro. A study of the basic philosophical problems raised by these dialogues. Conducted in Greek.


HIST 3515-R01 – Media History: 1400 to Present  (4 credits)
T. Rigogne     MR 4:00-5:15

This seminar will examine the evolution of media and the revolutions brought by new modes of communication, from the printing press in the 15th century to radio, television and the internet most recently. The book and audiovisual media have been major forces in history; we will examine the profound impact they have on culture, ideas, politics, soiciety, and the economy. Fulfills the EP3 requirement.


ITAL 3011-R01 – Dante and His Age  (4 credits)
S. Barsella      TF 11:30-12:45

This course introduces students to Dante’s world through a close reading of the Divine Comedy. In addition to exploring such themes as love and death, and human and divine justice, students will analyze imagery of the Other World in medieval science, theology, and poetry, and discuss such concepts as allegory, autobiography, and realism as applied to the Commedia. They will explore the historical and ideological context of its composition while also discussing its relevance for modern culture. Visual texts and selected readings from the Bible, Virgil, Ovid, Augustine, and other Dante’s works will complement this journey through the Commedia and Dante’s times.
Conducted in Italian.

ITAL 3063-R01 – Saturnian Spirits: Art and Literature in Italy  (4 credits)
A. Polcri      MR 11:30-12:45

By examining different literary genres of the Italian Renaissance and Baroque (novella, theatre, poetry, autobiography and epic poems), this course will focus on some of the most important courts of the peninsula (Firenze, Urbino, Mantova, Ferrara, Venezia and Roma), and will explore the relation of the visual arts and music to the literary production of eminent writers and artists (Brunelleschi, Alberti, Pico della Mirandola, Poliziano, Boiardo, Ariosto, Machiavelli, Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Cellini, Vasari, Tasso, Striggio, Marino and others). Students will also investigate the role patronage of the arts played in the 15th through the 17th centuries. Conducted in Italian.


LATN 3334-R01
– The Letters of Pliny  (4 credits)
R. Penella
   MR 2:30-3:45
A reading of select letters of Pliny the younger. Discussion of textual and stylistic questions and of the place of the letters in the Roman tradition of epistolography. Conducted in Latin.

MLAL 4002-R01
Animal Rights in Literature and Film  (4 credits)
C. Randall     TF 10:00-11:15

This course takes up the issues of animal rights, animal rights advocacy, and, to a related extent, environmental ethics. We examine and discuss these issues through literature, film, speakers, and field trips. Fulfills the senior Values requirement – open to RH students only.

MUSC 3123-R01 – Music in the Romantic Century  (4 credits)
L. Stempel     MR 10:00-11:15
Most of our current behaviors and beliefs with respect to Western music were first shaped in the cultural discourse of the 19th century. This course examines these as part of the interactions of 19th-century music composition, performance, and criticism with the major social, intellectual and cultural movements of the age, focusing on the work of Beethoven, Rossini, Berlioz, Wagner, Verdi, Brahms and Mussorgsky.

SPAN 3582-R01 – New York in Latino Literature  (4 credits)
A. Cruz-Malavé     MR 11:30-12:45

The representation of the City of New York by Spanish, Latin American, and New York Latino writers.  New York as viewed by Spanish and Latin American visiting and exile writers as well as by native Latino New York artists.  New York as a metaphor for artistic creation in a globalized world and as a center for a cosmopolitan Spanish and Latin American diasporic avantgarde. The constitution of neighborhoods, communities, andplaces such as El Barrio (East Harlem), Loisaida (Lower East Side), La 42 (42nd Street), Quisqueya Heights (Washington Heights, Manhattan), Los Sures (South Williamsburg, Brooklyn), El Bronx, and Queens in writing, film, and art.  New York as constructed by the Latino imagination.  To include authors such as Martí, Tablada, Lorca, Burgos, González, Arenas, Thomas, Piñero, Rivera, Prida, Braschi, Hijuelos, Manrique, Rodriguez, Leguizamo, and Troyano. Conducted in Spanish. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.

SPAN 4001-R01 – Cervantes and Don Quixote  (4 credits)
J. Jimenez-Belmonte
    MR 10:00-11:15
Close readings and discussion of Cervantes' masterpiece, Don Quixote. Emphasis on Cervantes' importance for the development of modern fiction. Conducted in Spanish.


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