Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


LC Course Offerings | LC Cross-Listed Courses | RH Course Offerings | RH Cross-Listed Courses

Please note that changes may occur. Make sure to view the course listings in Banner for updates or changes, prerequisites and lab fees, and consult your Comp Lit advisor for feedback on your course selection.

Lincoln Center Course Offerings 
20869 COLI 2000 L01 -
Texts and Contexts: Women and Independence in Africa (EP2) (3 credits)                       
Fawzia Mustafa    MW 2:15-3:20
An introduction to the literary analysis of texts and the cultural and historical contexts within which they are produced and read. Significant class time will be devoted to critical writing and to speaking about literature. An examination of African women’s literature, film and writing, regimes of gender, and the statuses of African Women as well as their place/role in processes of liberation, decolonization, and national independence on the continent.   


20868 COLI 4412 C01 -
Literature, Film, and Development (Comp. Lit. Capstone; Interdisciplinary Capstone; EP3; Globalism) (4 credits)          
Fawzia Mustafa    T 2:30-5:15    
We will study Development and its discourse as it has emerged since the eighteenth century within humanist frameworks of philosophy/science, (the animal-human divide) literature (stories/narrative as colonial inscription), and technology (as techne and prostheses manifest in photography, film and video), to explore the ways it inflects our perceptions and ways we read our own and other worlds. In particular, we will focus on how Development/development has constructed and shaped the many significations of “the human” from the early modern to contemporary times.


lincoln center cross-listed courses
10619 COMM2471 L01 (4 credits)                    Jennifer S. Clark
Introduction to Film                            TF 1:00-2:15
Examination of the aesthetics of film, its formal language and structure. Screening and analysis of representative films. Study of film theory and criticism. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite to other film courses. Lab fee.

10686 COMM4001 L01 (4 credits)                    Albert Auster
Films of Moral Struggle (Values/EP4)                T 2:30-5:15
The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

15676 COMM4001 L02 (4 credits)                    Michael Tueth
Films of Moral Struggle (Values/EP4)                MW 1:00-2:15
The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

20802 ENGL3045 L01 (4 credits)                    TBA
Theory for English Majors                        T 6:00-8:30
This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself.

20804 ENGL3045 L02 (4 credits)                    Lawrence Kramer
Theory for English Majors                        MW 11:30-12:45
This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself.

19301 ENGL3420 L01 (4 credits)                    Heather Dubrow
Poems of Shakespeare and Others                    MR 2:30-3:45
Although Shakespeare is best known as a playwright, he also composed many extraordinary poems, especially love sonnets. We will read them together with poetry by about five of his contemporaries. According to an old joke, sex, religion, and politics are the three subjects one should not discuss at dinner parties-- and these are precisely the subjects that recur most intriguingly and intensively in the poetry we'll be exploring together. A sampling of the issues we'll discuss: how does the poetry of the period reflect-- or conceal-- the political tensions that culminated in the English Revolution? why do so many poets of this era write sonnets? how do these texts treat desire and gender?

21668 ENGL3843 L01 (4 credits)                    Leonard D. Cassuto
Extraordinary Bodies                            W 8:30-11:00
From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives.

15900 ENGL4137 L01 (4 credits)                    Anne G. Hoffman
Hysteria/Sexuality/Unconscious (Core ICC/EP3)            MR 2:30-3:45
This interdisciplinary seminar is sponsored by the Department of English and the Department of History. The seminar explores issues raised by hysteria, sexuality and the unconscious in turn of the twentieth-century western culture-topics that cross disciplinary boundaries.

15901 HIST 4625 L01 (4 credits)                    Doron Ben-Atar
Hysteria/Sexuality/Unconscious (Core ICC/EP3)            MR 2:30-3:45
This interdisciplinary seminar is sponsored by the Department of English and the Department of History. The seminar explores issues raised by hysteria, sexuality and the unconscious in turn of the twentieth-century western culture-topics that cross disciplinary boundaries.

15270 WMST3020 L01 (4 credits)                    Nicole Fermon
Histories and Texts                            T 2:30-5:15
A historical perspective on the political, socio-economic, and philosophical dimensions of women's lives and the construction of gender, including critical analysis of women's writings and women's movements. The course will consider class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, and age. The particular areas of emphasis will vary according to the instructor's specializations.

20988 WMST4005 L01 (4 credits)                    Shonni Enelow
Queer Theory and the Americas                    MR 10:00-11:15
Drawing from the often divergent traditions of Anglo and Hispanic America, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to queer methodologies for cultural and literary studies. Students will encounter foundational queer theoretical texts (both historical and contemporary) as well as novels, plays, and films, and will explore, for themselves, what queerness means and does.

20989 WMST4005 L02 (4 credits)                    Carl P.T. Fischer
Queer Theory and the Americas                    MR 10:00-11:15

rose hill course offerings


18046 COLI 2000 R01 -
Texts & Contexts: Old/New Worlds (EP2/Globalism) (3 credits)                       
Chris GoGwilt    MR 2:30-3:45
Designed to situate modern texts within comparative global and historical contexts, the course aims to strengthen students’ critical reading and writing practices by studying the way contemporary works re-read and re-write earlier forms of writing and culture. Modern literature from Africa, America, India, and Indonesia will be studied in relation to excerpts from ancient Hindu, Greek, and Hebrew literature (The Odyssey, The Mahabharata, and the Bible).

18044 COLI 3000 R01 -
Theories of Comparative Literature (4 credits)                       
Chris GoGwilt    MR 11:30-12:45
A review of theories and methods of comparative literary studies, using literary theory and criticism as primary readings in conjunction with primary works of literature, drawing from a range of literary traditions.

22031 COLI 4124 R01 -
Seminar: Kieslowski’s Decalogue (4 credits)                      
Philip Sicker    R 2:30-5:00
The seminar is devoted to the extensive exploration of the Polish director Krzysztof Kieslowski’s ten-part work, The Decalogue, a series of films set in Warsaw in the early 1980s but inspired by and structured upon the Ten Commandments. The course will examine these multi-layered films both as individual meditations and as inter-connected narratives, analyzing their visual composition, probing their moral, psychological and religious implications, and confronting their abundant ambiguities. As we consider Kieslowski’s masterpiece in various contexts, we will draw upon ancillary readings in philosophy, literary theory, and aesthetics.


Rose hill cross-listed courses

10983 COMM2471 R01 (4 credits)                    TBA
Introduction to Film                            TF 1:00-2:15
Examination of the aesthetics of film, its formal language and structure. Screening and analysis of representative films. Study of film theory and criticism. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite to other film courses. Lab fee.

18134 COMM3461 R01 (4 credits)                    Adeena M. Karasick
Fiction into Film                            R 6:00-8:30
Cinematic adaptation of novels and short stories. Problems of narrative, genre, film language, imitation, etc., will be studied in the works of Film makers such as Bresson, Renoir, Lean, Buñuel, Antonioni, Merchant/Ivory, Wyler, etc. Lab fee.

19310 COMM4001 R01 (4 credits)                    Michael Tueth
Films of Moral Struggle (Values/EP4)                TF 2:30-3:45
The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

17051 ENGL2000 R32 (3 credits)                    Keri G. Walsh
Texts and Contexts: the Art of Tragedy (Globalism)            MR 2:30-3:45
An introduction to the literary analysis of texts and the cultural and historical contexts within which they are produced and read. Significant class time will be devoted to critical writing and to speaking about literature. Each section of Texts and Contexts will have a focus developed by the individual instructor and expressed in its subtitle. This course fulfills the Core requirements for the second Eloquentia Perfecta seminar.

15762 ENGL3206 R01 (4 credits)                    Corey W McEleney
Shakespeare: (Advanced Literature Core)                MR 2:30-3:45
Poetry and plays studied in relation to Renaissance and 20th-century concerns and ideologies. Emphasis on Shakespeare and his works read and constructed in regard to power, class, gender, and literary aesthetics.

20994 ENGL3333 R01 (4 credits)                    Melanie D. Holm
Captives/Cannibals/Rebels: (Advanced Literature Core/EP3)    TF 10:00-11:15
Captives, cannibals, and rebels are everywhere in early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think wbout why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and waht they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the 17th and 18th centuries; authors may include Mary Rowaldson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Eliza Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle.

21000 ENGL3359 R01 (4 credits)                    James Y. Kim
Asian Diasporic Literature                        TF 11:30-12:45
This course will introduce students so some key works of Asian diasporic literature, as well as to some crucial debates in Asian American studies. Some matters we may consider include the origins of the Asian American movement; the transnationalism debates; the intersections of race, gender, sexuality; and the emergence of an Asian American avante garde. Authors may include Maxine Hong Kingston, Chang-rae Lee, Li-Young Lee, Ha Jin, Young-Jean Lee, Jon Hau, Tan Lin, and others.

21002 ENGL3535 R01 (4 credits)                    Rebecca T. Sanchez
Modernist Poetry                            MR 2:30-3:45
Modernist Poetry offers an intensive survey of major thematic currents and formal experiments in British, Irish and American verse from the late 19th century through World War II. Beginning with Gerard Manley Hopkins and Thomas Hardy, the course will devote central attention to the poetic development of W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens, while also exploring works by such major figures as Ezra Pound, H.D., Robert Frost, Wilfred Owen, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, W.H. Auden and Langston Hughes.

18052 ENGL3662 R02 (4 credits)                         Daniel T. Contreras
Postwar U.S. Literature and Culture (EP3/Interdisciplinary Capstone) TF 11:30-12:45
This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.

21004 ENGL3701 R01 (4 credits)                    Cornelius Collins
American Writers in Paris (Advanced Literature Core)        MR 5:30-6:45
As a capital of modern Western culture, Paris has long been attractive to experimental artists from other countries, a home in exile to find supportive audiences, publishers, and collaborators. For American writers in the 20th century, this activity took place in roughly two movements: after WWI , the "Lost Generation" of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Stein and others, and after WWII a circle of African American authors including Wright, Baldwin, and Himes. Through a selection of their works, as well as the art and music of the period, this course will explore the creative aims and cultural contexts of these two innovative groups.


20963 HIST3985 R01 (4 credits)                        Ebru Turan
Middle East and the Ottoman Empire (Adv. Hist. Core/Middle East)    TF 1:00-2:15
The course proposes to trace the history of the Ottoman Empire from its emergence in the early fourteenth century (ca. 1300) as a small frontier principality, to its growth into a world empire in the sixteenth century, and then down to its final dissolution in 1923. Bringing the political, cultural, and social aspects of the six-century-long imperial history together, the course seeks to understand the ways in which the Ottoman past shaped the modern middle east.


21124 PHIL3945 R01 (4 credits)                    Jennifer A. Gosetti
Philosophy and Art                            MR 11:30-12:45
Philosophy and Art is a course in philosophical aesthetics for upper-level students with interests both in philosophy and in the various artistic and literary disciplines. Starting from a historical survey of discussions of art, we consider issues such as mimesis and representation, the ontological and epistemological value of art, the structure of artistic experience, and the status of the artist as the origin of the work of art. Readings include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Freud, Dewey, Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger, Danto, Foucault and de Bolla, and are presented in conjunction with studied attention to works of visual art as well as works in other media.

18122 POSC3418 R01 (4 credits)                    Patrick Ryan
Islamic Political Thought (Adv. Social Science Core)        TF 8:30-9:45
The relationship between religious authority and political legitimacy in the classical and modern Islamic worlds. Various ways Muslims over the past 1,400 years have thought about the proper distribution of power and authority in their societies. What is an "Islamic state," and has there ever actually been such a thing? How did classical Muslim thinkers deal with the disjunction between political reality and political ideals? How have Sunni and Shiite thinkers differed in their conceptions of proper government? How useful a concept is "Islamic fundamentalism," and how modern is it?

20776 SPAN3002 R01 (4 credits)                    Cynthia M. Vich
Latin American Lit./Culture Survey (Globalism/Adv. Lit.)    MR 11:30-12:45
The study of Spanish-American society through its cultural expressions: literature, art, music, film, and print journalism. To focus, in a given semester, on topics such as: "Literature and Art in Colonial Spanish America," "Literature and Film in Contemporary Spanish America," "Revolution in Spanish American Literature and Art," "Civilization and Barbarism," "National Identity, Race, and Gender in Spanish America," "Dictatorship and Resistance in Spanish America," and others. Taught in Spanish.




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