Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


 
Spring 2010

LC Course Offerings  |  LC Cross-Listed Courses  |  RH Course Offerings  |  RH Cross-Listed Courses

Lincoln Center Course Offerings

COLI 3519-L01 – Writing and Rewriting Seduction  (4 credits)
A. Clark      MR 10:00-11:15

This class examines the theme of seduction and its relation to writing in European literature pre-1789. Writers include among others: Heloise and Abelard, Boccaccio, Marguerite de Navarre, Marvell, Castiglione, Lafayette, Casanova, Bastide, Crébillon fils, Laclos, and Sade, in addition to critical works by Baudrillard, Paglia and others.


Lincoln Center Cross-listed Courses

COMM 4001-L01 – Films of Moral Struggle  (4 credits)
A. Auster      T 2:30-5:15

This course will survey both American and World Cinema for their approaches to moral and ethical issues. It will examine how these issues are presented to an audience and how these issues are resolved, or perhaps even left ambiguous or unresolved. It will also examine how these films' moral issues are framed by the filmmakers in various countries and cultures. Fulfills the Senior Values requirement – open to LC students only.

ENGL 3045-L01 – Theory for English Majors  (4 credits)
L. Kramer      MW 1:00-2:15

Ordinarily to be taken during the junior year, this course introduces the student to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of this course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself. Students will engage with a range of critical, theoretical, and social issues shaping the field of literary studies today. English and Comparative Literature majors/minors only. May be substituted for COLI 3000 - Theories of Comparative Literature.

ENGL 3843-L01 – Extraordinary Bodies  (4 credits)
C. Petit-Hall      TF 8:30-9:45

Extraordinary Bodies: Disability, Identity and Representation is an interdisciplinary seminar that examines the manner in which people with disabilities have been and are being portrayed in the arts (literature, memoir, drama, performance, film, visual arts). This course will take a disability studies approach, which considers the social and cultural aspects of disability. Students will be exposed to disability theory, as well as psychoanalytic theories of trauma which provide critical tools to interpret representations of disabilities both physical (those apparent to human eye) and psychological (those which cannot be seen). Selected works include marginalized individuals who, because of their differences, exist outside of mainstream culture, such as the "freak", the invalid, the deaf and the mute. In addition, several works portray individuals whose sufferings may not be visible, yet are disabling nonetheless, such as those fighting depression, psychological trauma, addiction, cancer and AIDS. This course is a discussion seminar in which every member of the class will be encouraged to engage with the complex and often taboo issues surrounding disability. The selected narratives and theoretical perspectives will enable an interactive exchange – one which will demand a reevaluation of preconceived notions of disability, and challenge the cultural assumptions imposed upon those who are disabled. Fulfills the Senior Values requirement – open to LC students only.

FREN 3400-L01 – Romanticism  (4 credits)
F. Harris    TF 11:30-12:45

The romantic revolution as seen in the works of Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Balzac, Stendhal, Hugo, Nerval and others. Conducted in French.

SPAN 3610-L01 – Children's Gaze in Latin American Literature  (4 credits)
C. Vich      MW 1:00-2:15

This course examines Latin American short stories, novels and poetry, which focus on the way children and adolescents view the world and on how they process their immediate socioeconomic and geographic contexts to construct their worldview and find their own place in society. Through our readings, we will explore childhood as a literary discourse, as a particular form of sensitivity towards the world. Topics such as the creation of imaginary worlds, the understanding of reality through the practice of play and the beginning of sexual awakening will be discussed in relation to the works read. Examples of the literary works that will usually be included in this course are: Alfredo Bryce's Un mundo para Julius, José María Arguedas' Los ríos profundos, and José Emilio Pacheco's Las batallas en el desierto. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement. Conducted in Spanish.

WMST 3010-L01 – Feminist Theories in Intercultural Perspective  (4 credits)
A. Hoffman      MR 2:30-3:45

An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.

Rose Hill Course Offerings

COLI 2000-R01 – Texts and Contexts: Latino Literature  (3 credits)
D. Contreras      TF 10:00-11:15

This course will consider Latina/o literature in various contexts: historical, political, and aesthetic. The course is divided into three discrete yet complementary units, each exploring a genre of written discourse. The first unit sets up the political project of Latina/o literature and how it often re-imagines historical conditions in order to construct a utopian vision. These novels could be described as constituting the "canon" of Chicana/o literature. The second unit considers the Latin American novel, and we will examine the conjunctions between private emotional experiences and larger historical contexts. These conjunctions take place here in stories where the protagonists learn what it is to be in the world affected by forces beyond their control. The last novels utilize postmodern forms in terms of the contemporary Latina/o novel at large. Here we want to consider what the novel itself can become in the future. Fulfills the core requirement in Literature in English and the distributive requirement in Eloquentia perfecta.

COLI 2000-R02 – Texts and Contexts: Latino Literature  (3 credits)
D. Contreras      TF 11:30-12:45

See description above.

COLI 2000-R03 – Texts and Contexts: Ethnic Voices   (3 credits)
J. Kim      TF 10:00-11:15

This course will examine works of literature by contemporary American ethnic writers, asking in particular what this body of work can teach us about the experience of race, the processes of racialization, and the founding narratives of the US nation state. The course will focus closely on a small handful of texts thus giving students sustained practice with some of the fundamental skills of literary analysis: how to interpret a literary text, how to situate it in its historical and cultural context, and how to write about it all in clear, effective, and persuasive prose. In order to coordinate the syllabus with various literary events on campus and across New York City, the exact reading list will vary from year to year, but some possible authors include Sherman Alexie, Sandra Cisneros, Junot Diaz, Chang-rae Lee, Toni Morrison, Karen Tei Yamashita, and many others. Fulfills the core requirement in Literature in English, and the distributive requirements in Eloquentia perfecta and American Pluralism.

COLI 2000-R04 – Texts and Contexts: Ethnic Voices   (3 credits)
J. Kim      TF 11:30-12:45

See description above.


Rose Hill Cross-listed Courses

COMM 4001-R01 – Films of Moral Struggle  (4 credits)
M. Tueth      MR 4:00-5:15

This course attempts to study how human values and moral choices are explored through both the narrative content and technique of the film medium. Philosophical and theological perspectives are brought to bear on various ethical questions which each film presents, while numerous critical approaches are employed to develop the students' appreciation of each film's technical aspects. The majority of the films studied are distinguished achievements in the American film canon, such as Casablanca, On the Waterfront, The Graduate, The Shawshank Redemption, Mystic River, American Beauty, and others. Fulfills the Senior Values requirement – open to RH students only.

ENGL 3045-R01 – Theory for English Majors  (4 credits)
C. GoGwilt      MR 2:30-3:45

Ordinarily to be taken during the junior year, this course introduces the student to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of this course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself. Students will engage with a range of critical, theoretical, and social issues shaping the field of literary studies today. English and Comparative Literature majors/minors only. May be substituted for COLI 3000 - Theories of Comparative Literature.

ENGL 3045-R02 – Theory for English Majors  (4 credits)
E. Badowska      T 2:30-5:15

See description above.

ENGL 3099-R01 – Translating Literature: Why and How?  (4 credits)
C. Brandt      TF 11:30-12:45

What does it take to translate a poem or story well? How to be true to the original and carry over its aesthetic excitement as well as its meaning? A course for those with a basic knowledge of a language other than English.

ENGL 3629-R01 – 20th-Century African American Literature  (4 credits)
Y. Christiansë      MR 11:30-12:45

A study of central African American writers in their cultural and historical contexts. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.

ENGL 3919-R01 – Writing Whiteness  (4 credits)
G. Hendler      TF 2:30-3:45

"As long as you think you are white, there's no hope for you" (James Baldwin). What could Baldwin have meant by such a provocative statement? This course will address the question by tracing the process by which Americans have come to think of themselves as "white", a category defined both against their own ethnic and national origins and against racial "others".

ENGL 3930-R01 – Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Literature  (4 credits)
E. Cahill      MR 4:00-5:15

This course will read texts by a diverse range of Anglophone authors, emphasizing the cultural history of same-sex identity and desire, heteronormativity and oppression, and queer civil protest. It will also consider the problems of defining a queer literary canon, introduce the principles of queer theory, and interrogate the discursive boundaries between the political and personal.

FREN 3470-R01 – Francophone Voices from North Africa  (4 credits)
L. Schreier      MR 2:30-3:45

If the colonial past has imposed a number of artistic challenges on the contemporary North African artists, it has also obliged many of them to be linguistically innovative. In this class, we will explore how North African francophone writers have experimented with French literary genres, as well as with bilingualism, in their struggle to fashion suitable creative spaces within the colonizer's language. We will use short stories, novels, poetry, memoirs, and films to analyze this relatively new (and often subversive) literary voice, and to see how it interprets and rephrases central contemporary narratives, including those of war, exile, and immigration. Readings may include Bouraoui, Chraïbi, Dib, Djebar, Feraoun, Haddad, Mokeddem and Sebbar. Conducted in French.

LALS 3437-R01 – Afro-Brazilian Film, Literature and Culture  (4 credits)
B. Wasserman      MR 10:00-11:15

This course examines central themes in Afro-Brazilian film, literature and culture. We will study the depiction of slavery, the construction of syncretic religions such as Candomblé and Macumba, the experience of Afro-Brazilian women, the image of favelas or shantytowns, and conclude with Afro-Brazilian music and performance.

SPAN 3070-R01 – The Latin American Urban Chronicle  (4 credits)
V. Mahieux      TF 10:00-11:15

This course will cover the urban chronicle from the late 19th century to the present, exploring how this hybrid genre negotiates its link to literature, media, public space and the cultural economy of the city. Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 3820-R01 –  Hispanic Caribbean Literature (4 credits)
A. Cruz-Malavé      MR 2:30-3:45

This course will focus on important topics in Caribbean literature such as national identity and gender, national identity and race, discourses of modernity and modernization, dictatorship and resistance, revolution in literature, migration and exile as literary tropes, and the appropriation of popular cultural forms. Authors may include Marti, Pales Matos, Guillen, Carpentier, Lezama Lima, Mir, Sanchez, Arenas, Verges, and Vega. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement. Conducted in Spanish.


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