Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 



Spring 2012

LC Course Offerings  |  LC Cross-Listed Courses  |  RH Course Offerings  |  RH Cross-Listed Courses

Please note that changes may occur. Make sure to view the course listings in Banner for updates or changes, prerequisites and lab fees, and consult your Comp Lit advisor for feedback on your course selection.


Lincoln Center Course Offerings

COLI 2000-L01
– Texts and Contexts: Women and Independence in Africa  (3 credits)
F. Mustafa    MW 1:00-2:15

An examination of gender, African women's literature and their place in processes of liberation, decolonization, and national independence on the continent. Authors may include: Mariama Ba, Sadaawi, Bessie Head, Marks, Dangarembga, and Adiche. Fulfills the core requirement in Literature in English, the distributive requirement in Eloquentia perfecta (EP2), and the Global Studies requirement.

COLI 3122-L01
The Eternal Feminine in Literature and Film  (4 credits)
Instructor TBA
   MR 2:30-3:45
In this course, we will study the myth of the Eternal Feminine, understood as a source of mystery, fear and fascination bringing together many myths of woman together. Deeply rooted in our collective imaginary, this complex representation will be analyzed throughout a selection of literary works written from the end of the 18th century (when Goethe uses the expression for the first time) and films that will allow us to discuss the adaptation of classical texts on screen; the creation and spreading of a myth through literature, opera, and cinema; and the impact of the feminist critique of the myth on contemporary representations of women. Fulfills the Advanced Disciplinary Core requirement in Literature.


COLI 3664-L01
Postcolonial Literatures  (4 credits)
F. Mustafa
   MW 11:30-12:45
A survey of the post-independence Anglophone literatures of the Caribbean, Africa, and South Asia, including the literatures of their respective Diapsoras. We will also read some translations from the Francophone, Lusophone, and Hispanophone traditions. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement.

Lincoln Center Cross-listed Courses

COMM 2471-L01 – Introduction to Film  (4 credits)
J. Clark
     TF 1:00-2:15
Examination of the aesthetics of film, its formal language and structure. Screening and analysis of representative films. Study of film theory and criticism. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite to other film courses.

COMM 4001-L01 – Films of Moral Struggle  (4 credits)
M. Tueth     MW 1:00-2:15

This course attempts to study how human values and moral choices are explored through both the narrative content and technique of the film medium. Philosophical and theological perspectives are brought to bear on various ethical questions which each film presents, while numerous critical approaches are employed to develop the students' appreciation of each film's technical aspects. The majority of the films studied are distinguished achievements in the American film canon, such as Casablanca, On the Waterfront, The Graduate, The Shawshank Redemption, Mystic River, American Beauty, and others. Fulfills the senior Values requirement – open to LC students only.

COMM 4001-L02 – Films of Moral Struggle  (4 credits)
A. Auster      T 2:30-5:15

This course will survey both American and World Cinema for their approaches to moral and ethical issues. It will examine how these issues are presented to an audience and how these issues are resolved, or perhaps even left ambiguous or unresolved. It will also examine how these films' moral issues are framed by the filmmakers in various countries and cultures. Fulfills the senior Values requirement – open to LC students only.

ENGL 3045-L01 – Theory for English Majors  (4 credits)
Instructor TBA      MW 1:00-2:15

This course introduces the student to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of this course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself. Students will engage with a range of critical, theoretical,and social issues shapingthe field of literary studies today. English and Comparative Literature majors/minors only. May be substituted for COLI 3000 - Theories of Comparative Literature.

ENGL 3206-L01 – Shakespeare  (4 credits)
S. Sherman      TF 2:30-3:45

Poetry and plays studied in relation to Renaissance and 20th-century concerns and ideologies. Emphasis on Shakespeare and his works read and constructed in regard to power, class, gender and literary aesthetics.

ENGL 3468-L01
Transatlantic Modern Women  (4 credits)
A. Fernald    TF 11:30-12:45

A literature course focused on gender and modernism from both sides of the Atlantic. As many women writers from 1900-1960 were immigrants and travelers, we have a cosmopolitan focus. Writers include: Zora Neale Hurston, Virginia Woolf, Gertrude Stein and Jean Rhys.


ENGL 3652-L01
– New Wave Immigration Fiction  (4 credits)
E. Stone     T 2:30-5:15
If the immigrant of the late 1800s and early 1900s valued assimilation, the post-1965 newcomer to America has forged a new cultural identity. This course will look at the attempts to situate oneself in America while maintaining a tie to one's family's country of origin in works by authors such as Amy Tan, Bharati Mukherjee, Gish Jen, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Cristina Garcia and others. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.


ENGL 3841-L01
– Contemporary Fiction  (4 credits)
W. Tanksley    TF 11:30-12:45
What makes comtemporary fiction "contemporary"? How does it differ from pre-World War II fiction or so-called "modernist" writing? This course explores the fundamental transformation of the way contemporaries see the world, dealing with writers as diverse as Kundera, Nabokov, Philip Roth, Pynchon, Ishmael Reed, Joan Didion, Marquez, Mishma, Robbe-Grillet, Patrick Suskind, Calvino and Vonnegut.

ENGL 3843-L01 – Extraordinary Bodies  (4 credits)
L. Cassuto    W 8:30-11:00

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the  experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives. Fulfills the Senior Values requirement – open to LC students only.

FREN 3561-L01 – Modern French Theater  (4 credits)
F. Harris    TF 11:30-12:45

Major French dramatists of the 20th century, starting with Dada and the surrealist theater through the existentialist theater and the Theater of the Absurd. Playwrights may include Giraudoux, Cocteau, Claudel, Anouilh, Sartre, Genet, Ionesco and Beckett. Conducted in French.

ITAL 3550-L01 – Italian Unification in Film and Literature  (4 credits)
J. Perricone     MR 4:00-5:15
Realism and idealism in the achievement of Italian unification analysed in the works of filmmakers such as Blasetti and Scola, and in writers like Foscolo, Mazzini, Garibaldi, Lampedusa and others. Conducted in Italian.


LATN 3000-L01
Latin Poetry  (4 credits)
Instructor TBA    T 2:30-5:15
To introduce advanced students of Latin to the lyric poetry of Catullus and Horace through translation, stylistic and metrical analysis, and discussion of the poets' literary tradition.

MLAL 3402-L01 – Introduction to Russian Drama  (4 credits)
Y. Pomerantsev    MR 2:30-3:45
This course examines the modern Russian theatrical tradition from the nineteenth century to the present and explores a range of plays including works by Pushkin, Gogol, Ostrovsky, Chekhov, Bulgakov, Shvarts, Petrushevskaya, Pelevin, Grishkovets, among others.

MLAL 3442-L01 – Arab Culture and News Media  (4 credits)
Q. Al-Attabi     TF 1:00-2:15
The American news media portrays the Arab world as one of endless political upheaval and repression, with a culture shaped strictly by Islam. This course broadens students' understanding of contemporary Arab societies through the study of Arab TV/radio/print/internet news, propaganda and cartoons, from those sanctioned by government-run outlets to those of national-resistance activists, democracy-promoting movements and even jihadists. The news is used in this course to investigate cultural issues, including authority and decision-making, religion, gender and family dynamics in Arab societies as well as to explore American-Arab relations. Through a study of media, students can compare Arab culture as portrayed by American media, and American culture as portrayed by the media in the Arab world. Class conducted in English, with materials in English and Arabic with English subtitles.

PHIL 3220-L01 – Paradoxes in Philosophy  (4 credits)
B. Frances     MW 1:00-2:15

In this course we will examine some of the most intractable paradoxes in philosophy, the kind that keep philosophers and logicians and some scientists up at night: the liars paradox, the sorites paradox, paradoxes about infinity, and others. A philosophical paradox usually consists of several ideas each of which seems clearly true, yet downright inconsistent with one another (so they cannot all be true). This invites intellectual discomfort. No matter what the proper resolution of the paradox, we can see that it will require a fundamental and radical shift on our world-view. This course involves philosophy of language, but depending on student interest, may include problems from free will, determinism, skepticism, and the problem of evil.

PHIL 3245-L01
– Mind, Language and World  (4 credits)
W. Jaworski    MW 11:30-12:45

This course covers a range of important topics at the intersection of philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, and metaphysics.

POSC 3507-L01 – International Human Rights  (4 credits)
A. Taub    MW 11:30-12:45
An examination of the international system for the protection of human rights: legal and political theory, cultural relativism, diplomatic protection and the concept of human rights law; legal instruments and institutions; substantive law.

RUSS 3020-L01
– The Russian Short Story  (4 credits)
Y. Pomerantsev    MR 4:00-5:15
This course will examine the literary works of the age of Romanticism. Although it will focus primarily on the prose of Alexander Pushkin and Mikhail Lermontov, it will also consider the writings of their predecessors like Vasiliy Zhukovskij and Konstantin Batyushkov. Students will have the opportunity to discover and evaluate the peculiarities of Russian Romanticism, particularly in the context of the synthesis of the autochtonic cultural traditions and Western Romantic ideas. Special attention will be paid to the evolution of the idea of the "hero". Conducted in Russian.

SPAN 3001-L01 – Topics in Spanish Culture  (4 credits)
C. Kasten      TF 10:00-11:15

The study of Spanish society through its cultural expressions: literature, art, music, film, and print journalism. To focus, in a given semester, on topics such as: "Literature and Art in Golden-Age Spain," "Literature and Film in Contemporary Spain," "Literature and Art in Modern Spain," "Social Criticism in Spanish Literature ad Art," "Orientalism in Spanish Literature and Art," and others.
Conducted in Spanish.

SPAN 3001-L01 – Topics in Spanish-American Culture  (4 credits)
C. Vich     MR 2:30-3:45
The study of Spanish-American society through its cultural expressions: literature, art, music, film, and print journalism. To focus, in a given semester, on topics such as: "Literature and Art in Colonial Spanish America," "Literature and Film in Contemporary Spanish America," "Revolution in Spanish-American Literature and Art," "Civilization and Barbarism," "National Identity, Race, and Gender in Spanish America," "Dictatorship and Resistance in Spanish America," and others. Conducted in Spanish. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement.

SPAN 3126-L01 – Spanish Golden Age-The ages  (4 credits)
C. Kasten     TF 2:30-3:45
This course focuses on the Spanish Golden Age through texts from the 16th through the 21st centuries to examine how different artists, theorists, and governments define the Golden Age period and to what end. Authors may include Eduardo Marquina, Federico García Lorca, Camilo José Cela, Juan Goytisolo, Ernesto Caballero, Arturo Perez-Reverte, Michele Foucault, Joel-Peter Witkin, Pilar Miró. Conducted in Spanish.


WMST 3010-L01 –
Feminist Theories in Intercultural Perspective  (4 credits)
Instructor TBA      T 2:30-5:15
An examination of contemporary feministtheories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.

Rose Hill Course Offerings

COLI 3000-R01 – Theories of Comparative Literature  (4 credits)
C. GoGwilt
    MR 4:00-5:15
A review of theories and methods of comparative literary studies, using literary theory and criticism as primary readings in conjunction with works of literature drawn from a range of literary traditions. Fulfills the theory requirement for Comparative Literature and English majors.

Rose Hill Cross-listed Courses

ARAB 3624-R01
– Music and Nation in the Arab World  (4 credits)
M. Alsiadi     TF 10:00-11:15

Though music is a domain of individual expression, it may also reflect or respond to social, cultural and historical influences of a time and place.
This course explores the ways in which music acts as an expression of national identity in the Arab world. It considers the relationship in a region where the idea of nation has multiple meanings, and where conflicting factors such as regional diversity and the notion of pan-Arabism exist. Specifically, the course focuses on how particular types of music, including Aleppian Waslah, the Al-Qasida al-ghinaiya, and Al-Muwashah, have affected the development and embodiment of national identity in the 20th century. Course materials are presented in English.

COMM 3111-R01
– Gender Images in Media (4 credits)
Instructor TBA     W 8:30-11:00
TBA.

COMM 4001-R01 – Films of Moral Struggle  (4 credits)
M. Tueth      TF 1:00-2:15

This course attempts to study how human values and moral choices are explored through both the narrative content and technique of the film medium. Philosophical and theological perspectives are brought to bear on various ethical questions which each film presents, while numerous critical approaches are employed to develop the students' appreciation of each film's technical aspects. The majority of the films studied are distinguished achievements in the American film canon, such as Casablanca, On the Waterfront, The Graduate, The Shawshank Redemption, Mystic River, American Beauty, and others. Fulfills the senior Values requirement – open to RH students only.

ENGL 3039-R01
– Love and US Latino Literature  (4 credits)
D. Contreras
    TF 10:00-11:15
This class will focus on the U.S. Latino literary tradition with a concentration on contemporary texts. We will cover a range of literature from poetry to plays, emphasizing issues of love, desire and sexuality, as well as history and memory as central themes. Authors include Sandra Cisneros, Gabriel García Márquez, John Rechy and Miguel Piñero.

ENGL 3111-R01 – Medieval Romance  (4 credits)
K. Little     TF 1:00-2:15

A study of romance's durable popular appeal, this course examines texts from the 12th to 15th centuries and compares them with later romance traditions. Fulfills the distributive requirement in Eloquentia Perfect (EP3).

ENGL 3111-R02 – Medieval Romance  (4 credits)
K. Little     TF 2:30-3:45

See description above.

ENGL 3333-R01 – Captives/Cannibals/Rebels  (4 credits)
J. Kim      MR 10:00-11:15

Captives, cannibals, and rebels are everywhere in early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire.
In this course, we will think about why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and what they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the 17th and 18th centuries; authors may include Mary Rowaldson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Eliza Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle. Fulfills the distributive requirement in Eloquentia Perfect (EP3).

ENGL 3673-R01 – Postmodern American Novel  (4 credits)
D. Contreras     TF 11:30-12:45

Postmodernism marks the time and space after WWII; the globe has become the global market, producing wide ranging cultural and political effects. These effects are explored in various experimental novels by American writers including Philip K Dick, Pynchon, De Lillo, William S. Burroughs, and David Foster Wallace. The course will concentrate on a selection of novels that attempt to make sense of a world dominated by commodities and images in a time of endless war.

ENGL 3964-R01
– Homelessness  (4 credits)
S. Greenfield     TF 1:00-2:15
This service learning course explores the literary representation and lived experience of homelessness. For the academic portion of the course, we will read literature about homelessness from The Odyssey to the recently published memoir Breaking Night. The service portion of the course will include meetings and discussions with homeless and formerly homeless people and at least 30 hours of volunteer work with a relevant service organization.

ENGL 4138-R01
– The Great Code - Bible and Literature  (4 credits)
M. Chase SJ    MR 11:30-12:45
This course will introduce students to knowledge of the bible and how to apply this knowledge to a better understanding and appreciation of English literature. The theoretical base of the course is Northrop Frye's The Great Code, and with Frye's theory as a background, we will read and discuss a variety of English poetry that is inspired by biblical themes. The poems we study will range from the middle Ages to the present. Fulfills the distributive requirement in Eloquentia Perfect (EP3).

ENGL 4138-R02 – The Great Code - Bible and Literature  (4 credits)
M. Chase SJ    MR 2:30-3:45
See description above.

FREN 3452-R01 – 19th-Century Short Story  (4 credits)
L. Schreier      MR 11:30-12:45

The short story as a literary genre studied in the context of the political, social, economic and cultural unrest of the 19th century. Authors will include Zola, Barbey d'Aurevilly, Maupassant and Flaubert. Conducted in French.

HIST 3516-R01
– The Social Life of Coffee: 1500 to Present  (4 credits)
T. Rigogne     MR 4:00-5:15

This seminar will explore the rich and complex history of coffe and coffeehouses across time and place.
We will follow coffee as it moved from the hills in Ethiopia to the sixteenth-century coffeehouses of Cairo, from the trading post of Mocha and the colonial plantations of Java or on Caribbean islands to the cafes of Paris and Vienna, and finally from the estates ofColumbia, Brazil, or Africa to our own Starbucks stores. As coffe became a commodity for mass consumption while coffeehouses assumed a central place in urban cultures, their history took place at the crossroads of local and global cultures, where international trade and geopolitics interact with lifestyles and socio-economic trends. Fulfills the distributive requirement in Eloquentia Perfect (EP3).

HIST 3940-R01 – The African City  (4 credits)
C. Ray     MR 2:30-3:45

This Service-Learning Initiative course examines the histories of urban centers in Africa and her Black Atlantic diaspora.
Representative cities are St. Louis (Senegal), Timbuktu (Mali), Accra (Ghana), Alexandria (Egypt), Khartoum (Sudan), Cape Town (South Africa), Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), Zanzibar City (Zanzibar), Harare (Zimbabwe), Salvador-Bahia (Brazil), New York City (USA), and Liverpool (England). The cities represent the spatial, aesthetic, and demographic, economic, political, and social histories that have produced "The African City" both in Africa and the wider Black Atlantic world. Through Service-Learning Initiative's "living and learning," students will experience, first hand, the historical processes through which New York City became and continues to be an "African city." Interaction with New York's historic African-American community, as well as its growing African immigrant community, will help students understand the links between forced migration of enslaved Africans to the city and more recent waves of African immigration which have renewed the city's linkages with the continent.

HIST 4505-R01
– Early Modern World: Art and Science  (4 credits)
W. Myers     MR 4:00-5:15

European exploration and interaction in the 16th and 17th centuries expanded the horizons not only of the Europeans but of the entire world. It was also the beginning of a truly global system of exchange involving peoples, products, money, and microbes that in turn transformed European art, philosophy, religion, and science. This course will analyze the dizzying world of early modernity through consideration of the way its scientists, artists and religious thinkers understood their society and treated the materials of their disciplines. We will trace first the economic and human consequences of this newly global system, for Europeans and non-Europeans alike, and we will then explore questions proper to each discipline at the time, the changes they underwent, as the ways that new interactions and discoveries shocked and exploded ancient traditions and authority, and how the approaches of the period compare to contemporary methods in each area. Fulfills the Interdisciplinary Capstone requirement - open to RH students only.

ITAL 3062-R01 – Ethics and Economic Value in Medieval Literature  (4 credits)
S. Barsella     MR 10:00-11:15

This course introduces students to the literary representation of economic values such as profit, work, and utility as they emerge in medieval texts. Students will analyze these values within the critical perspective of the 13th- to 15th-century authors as seen in their political, historical, and literary contexts. This course covers works from early European lyric poetry, and authors such as Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarch, Erasmus, and Leon Battista Alberti. Students will learn to set their discussions in the broad perspective of European intellectual history. Conducted in Italian.

LALS 3437-R01 – Afro-Brazilian Film, Literature and Culture  (4 credits)
Instructor TBA
     TF 10:00-11:15
This course examines central themes in Afro-Brazilian film, literature and culture. We will study the depiction of slavery, the construction of syncretic religions such as Candomblé and Macumba, the experience of Afro-Brazilian women, the image of favelas or shantytowns, and conclude with Afro-Brazilian music and performance. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement.

LATN 3060-R01
– Readings in Vergil  (4 credits)
S. Pierce
   MR 2:30-3:45
Readings from Eclogues, Georgics, and Aeneid. Conducted in Latin.

MLAL 3504-R01
– Berlin Tales: Germany's Kiez  (4 credits)
M. Ebner    TF 2:30-3:45

This course will take us on a journey a journey that will start in the urban sphere of New York City, in a classroom reading historical texts and cultural narratives on the metropolis Berlin. But during Spring Break 2012, we will also have a truly unique opportunity of traveling together to discover the actual streets of Berlin, the center of modernity in Germany itself. We will read authors who present conflicting views and engaging perspectives on four distinct Berlins: the Jewish Berlin of the Weimar Republic, Berlin during the Third Reich, the city as the capital of East Germany, and lastly, Berlin as booming metropolis of the 21st century. And together, we will visit Berlin to discover different life styles, the pulse of minorities, and the nostalgic feeling of Ostalgie or present day Berlin.

PHIL 3650-R01
– 20th-Century Philosophy  (4 credits)
S. Grimm     MR 2:30-3:45
An examination of major philosophical movements of the 20th century.

SPAN 3002-R01 – Topics in Spanish-American Culture  (4 credits)
A. Cruz-Malavé     MR 11:30-12:45

The study of Spanish-American society through its cultural expressions: literature, art, music, film, and print journalism. To focus, in a given semester, on topics such as: "Literature and Art in Colonial Spanish America," "Literature and Film in Contemporary Spanish America," "Revolution in Spanish-American Literature and Art," "Civilization and Barbarism," "National Identity, Race, and Gender in Spanish America," "Dictatorship and Resistance in Spanish America," and others. Conducted in Spanish. Fulfills the Global Studies requirement.

SPAN 3642-R01 – Spanish-American Literature and Popular Music  (4 credits)
G. Marún
     MR 2:30-3:45
The significant role of popular music such as bolero, tango, milonga in Latin American postmodern novel. Authors may include M. Puig, R. Sanchez, G. Cabrera Infante, L. Otero , M. Montero, R. Ampero. Conducted in Spanish.

WMST 3010-R01 – Feminist Theories in Intercultural Perspective  (4 credits)
J. Green     MR 4:00-5:15
An examination of contemporary feministtheories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective. Fulfills the American Pluralism requirement.


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