Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


LC Course Offerings | LC Cross-Listed Courses | RH Course Offerings | RH Cross-Listed Courses

Please note that changes may occur. Make sure to view the course listings in Banner for updates or changes, prerequisites and lab fees, and consult your Comp Lit advisor for feedback on your course selection.

Lincoln Center Course Offerings 
C
OLI 2000 L01- Texts and Contexts  (3 Credits)
F. Mustafa    MW 1:00-2:15

An introduction to the literary analysis of texts and the cultural and historical contexts within which they are produced and read. Significant class time will be devoted to critical writing and to speaking about literature. Each section of Texts and Contexts will have a focus developed by the individual instructor and expressed in its subtitle. This course fulfills the Core requirements for the second Eloqentia Perfecta seminar.

COLI 2000 L02- Texts and Contexts  (3 Credits)
TBA    MW 1:00-2:15

COLI 3450 L01- City in Literature and Art  (4 Credits)
A. Hoffman    T 2:30-5:15
The structures, spaces, people, and life patterns of cities in the imagination of writers and visual artists from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. We will focus on Berlin, Paris, and New York, using the work of Walter Benjamin as a stimulus to thinking about our own relationship to the urban environment.

COLI 4412 C01 - Representing Art in Literature  (4 Credits)
A. Clark    W 6:00-8:45

Art and its literary representation in 17th and 18th century France and England. In this seminar, we will examine the literary representation of art (portraits, landscape, etc.) in novels. What is the status of these representations? In what ways does this status change from the 17th to the end of the 18th centuries? In order to analyze the import of visual representation in literary texts, we will also read a number of works of early art criticism both in England and France as well as contemporary criticism and theory. As such, we will try to determine the interrelation between history of the visual and literary culture in the early modern period. Texts can be read in the original language if desired.

lincoln center cross-listed courses
COMM 2471 L01 (4 credits)               Jennifer S. Clark
Introduction to Film                           W 11:30-2:15

Examination of the aesthetics of film, its formal language and structure. Screening and analysis of representative films. Study of film theory and criticism. Strongly recommended as a prerequisite to other film courses. Lab fee.

COMM 4001 L01 (4 credits)                                Albert Auster
Films of Moral Struggle (Senior Values)                T 2:30-5:15
The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

COMM 4001 L02 (4 credits)               Michael Tueth
Films of Moral Struggle    `                 TF 11:30-12:45
The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

COMM 4001 L03 (4 credits)               Adeena M. Karasick
Films of Moral Struggle    `                 TF 10:00-11:15

The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

ENGL 3045 L01 (4 credits)                 TBA
Theory for English Majors                   TF 10:00-11:15
This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself.

ENGL 3417 L01 (4 credits)                 Vlasta Vranjes
Early Victorian Novels                        MR 10:00-11:15
A study of the novels of the early Victorian period.

ENGL 3529 L01 (4 credits)                  Shoshana Enelow
Theater and the Avant-Garde                TF 1:00-2:15

ENGL 3627 C01 (4 credits)                                                     Dennis Tyler
Literary Adaptations: African-American Literature and Film        W 6:00-8:45
From Malcolm X and Alex Haley's The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965) to Ntozake Shange's For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Enuf (1975), African American literature had certainly inspired several film adaptations. Indeed, the number of cinematic adaptations of African American literature suggests that there is not only a particular fascination with transforming literary works into films but also aiding interest in seeing how a text will translate onto the big screen. This class will analyze selected texts (such as Alice Walker's The Color Purple [1982], Terry McMillan's Waiting to Exhale [1992], and Sapphire's Push [1996]) alongside their cinematic counterparts (such as Steven Spielberg's The Color Purple [1985], Forrest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale [1995], and Lee to discuss how literary and filmic texts measure up on their own worth as well as to examine how these texts mutually inform one another, particularly in the ways that they become remembered in the American cultural imagination.

ENGL 3670 C01 (4 credits)                                                  Elisabeth A. Frost
The Body in Comparative Women’s Literature and Art            M 6:00-8:45
How do we understand relationships among identity, gender, race, and the human body? How do recent women writers and artists explore this question? This course will examine visual art and writing since the 1980s that depicts--and seeks to understand--human embodiment, challenging the idea of a physical norm in order to expand how bodies (especially women's) are represented and known.

ENGL 3843 L01 (4 credits)                      Jonathon Appels
Extraordinary Bodies (Senior Values)        W 8:30-11:15
From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives.

POSC 1100 L01 (3 credits)                     Sarah P. Lockhart
Introduction to Politics                            MW 1:00-2:15
Introduces students to major approaches to the study of politics. Examines key political concepts such as power, democracy, and freedom; types of political actors, such as political parties, interest groups, and leaders; and important political institutions. Situates contemporary politics within social structure and history.

POSC 3507 L01 (4 credits)                                                   Amanda R. Taub
International Human Rights (Adv. Social Science Core)            TF 10:00-11:15

An examination of the international system for the protection of human rights: legal and political theory, cultural relativism, diplomatic protection and the concept of human rights law; legal instruments and institutions; substantive law.

SPAN 3001 L01 (4 credits)                         Carey N. Kasten
Spain: Literature and Culture Survey            TF 10:00-11:15
A broad survey of Spanish culture through the study of some of its major literary figures and texts. The course will examine representative texts from important artistic movements in Spain, such as the Renaissance, the baroque, neoclassicism, romanticism, realism and postmodernism. By the end of the course, students will be able to define the main characteristics of these movements and will be familiar with important literary figures, such as Garcilaso de la Vega, Calderón de la Barca, Lope de Vega, Moratín, Bécquer, Larra, Leopoldo Alas, Pardo Bazán, Antonio Machado, Unamuno, Ramón Sénder, Aleixandre and Martín Gaite. Students will also be familiar with Spanish history and its relationship to the cultural field.

VART 3267 C01 (4 credits)                        Mark F. Street
Film and the City                                      T 6:00-8:45
After looking at ways in which the city has been framed historically in films, students will pursue research in the city using video as their tool. Using interviews, screen text, voice over, and other documentary techniques, students will explore a project of interest to them and make a series of short films that reveal an apsect of the urban milieu. In class sessions and in one on one meetings with the professor, students will propose and refine their project and gather feedback about communicating in visual language on city issues.

WMST 3010 L01 (4 credits)                       Anne G. Hoffman
Feminist Theory in Inter-Cultural                 MR 4:00-5:15
An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective.

rose hill course offerings

COLI 3100 R01 - World Cinema Masterpieces (Adv. Lit. Core) (4 credits)
P. Sicker    TF 11:30-12:45
World Cinema Materpieces provides a close analysis of style, narrative, structure and visual texture in selected masterworks of major European, Asian, and American directors. Directors under consideration include: Renoir, Carne, Lang, Welles, Ophuls, Hitchcock, Bresson, Kurosawa, Ray, Bergman, Rossellini, Fellini, Trufaut, Tarkovsky, Kieslowski, Fassbinder and Altman.

COLI 3471 R01 -
Luigi Pirandello in Context: The Subject and its Masks (4 credits)
F. Parmeggiani    TF 10:00-11:15
A study of the narrative, theatre and theoretical essays of Luigi Pirandello (1867-1936; Nobel Prize 1934) in the context of the literary, cultural, and social developments in early 20th-century Italy and Europe.

Rose hill cross-listed courses
CLAS 4020 R01 (4 credits)                                                         Matthew M. McGowan
The Classical Tradition in Contemporary Fiction and Film (EP 3)    TF 10:00-11:15
This course provides a survey of classical works from ancient Greece and Rome and their reception in contemporary literature and film. The objective is threefold: first, to learn about patterns of narrative intrinsic to the representation of myth and history in classical literature; then to observe how these patterns function both in works of the classical period and also in contemporary fiction and film; and finally, to consider why classical antiquity has proved an enduring source of inspiration for writers and film-makers of today.

COMM 3110 R01 (4 credits)                                                       Robin K. Andersen
Peace, Justice, and the Media (Adv. Social Science Core)            TF 2:30-3:45
This course analyzes the ways in which the media represent the issues of peace and justice. Considering the relevance of peace and justice for democratic practices, the variety of media depictions of such issues will be analyzed. Topics such as environmental and economic justice, poverty and the poor, race and gender, war and peace, and media ethics and values will be covered.

COMM 4001 R01 (4 credits)                                     Adeena M. Karasick
Films of Moral Struggle (Value Seminar/EP 4)                     W 11:30-1:59
The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

COMM 4001 R02 (4 credits)                                             Michael Tueth
Films of Moral Struggle (Value Seminar/EP 4)                    MR 2:30-3:45
The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

ENGL 3045 R01 (4 credits)                           Moshe Gold
Theory for English Majors                             TF 10:00-11:15
This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself.

ENGL 3333 R01 (4 credits)                                                  Julie C. Kim
Captives, Cannibals, and Rebels (Adv. Lit. Core)                    MR 4:00-5:15
Captives, cannibals, and rebels are everywhere in early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think wbout why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and waht they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the 17th and 18th centuries; authors may include Mary Rowaldson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Eliza Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle.

ENGL 3340 R01 (4 credits)                              Rebecca T. Sanchez
Modern Geographies (Adv. Lit. Core)                 MR 2:30-3:45
This course will explore the ways shifting conceptions of space impacted modernist writing. Developments in technologies of communication and transportation enabled both people and ideas to move across space in new ways, challenging national identities and the relationship between self and other. Much of the innovation we associated with literary modernism emerges in response to this increasingly globalized landscape. Our analysis of modernism's globalized spaces will include: discussions of urbanism, public space, colonialism and post-colonialism, expatriate and travel writing, and representations of inner states of being.

ENGL 3662 R01 (4 credits)                                                   Daniel T. Contreras
Postwar U.S. Literature and Culture (EP3/ Adv. Lit. Core)        TF 2:30-3:45
This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.

ENGL 3665 R01 (4 credits)                                    James Y. Kim
Coming of Age, Asian-American (Pluralism)            TF 10:00-11:15
In this course we will examine a variety of ways in which contemporary Asian-American authors have responded to the difficulty of growing up as outsiders.

ENGL 3684 R01 (4 credits)                                              Julie C. Kim, Oneka LaBennett
Food and Globalization (Interdisciplinary Capstone)            MR 11:30-12:45
This course will examine scholarship on food and globalization from a range of disciplinary perspectives, including anthropological, sociological, historical, and literary. It will also examine the interdisciplinary fields of food studies and globalization studies to discuss the development of global exchange networks and their impact on consumer cultures and notions of identity in the united states and beyond.

ENGL 3701 R01 (4 credits)                                    Cornelius Collins
American Writers in Paris (Adv. Lit. Core)                TR 5:30-6:45
As a capital of modern Western culture, Paris has long been attractive to experimental artists from other countries, a home in exile to find supportive audiences, publishers, and collaborators. For American writers in the 20th century, this activity took place in roughly two movements: after WWI , the "Lost Generation" of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Stein and others, and after WWII a circle of African American authors including Wright, Baldwin, and Himes. Through a selection of their works, as well as the art and music of the period, this course will explore the creative aims and cultural contexts of these two innovative groups.

HIST 3940 R01 (4 credits)                                                  Carina E. Ray
The African City (Service Learning/Adv. Hist. Core)                W 11:30-2:00
This Service-Learning Initiative course examines the histories of urban centers in Africa and her Black Atlantic diaspora. Representative cities are St. Louis (Senegal), Timbuktu (Mali), Accra (Ghana), Alexandria (Egypt), Khartoum (Sudan), Cape Town (South Africa), Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), Zanzibar City (Zanzibar), Harare (Zimbabwe), Salvador-Bahia (Brazil), New York City (USA), and Liverpool (England). The cities represent the spatial, aesthetic, and demographic, economic, political, and social histories that have produced "The African City" both in Africa and the wider Black Atlantic world. Through Service-Learning Initiative's "living and learning," students will experience, first hand, the historical processes through which New York City became and continues to be an "African city." Interaction with New York's historic African-American community, as well as its growing African immigrant community, will help students understand the links between forced migration of enslaved Africans to the city and more recent waves of African immigration which have renewed the city's linkageswith the continent.

LATN 3009 R01 (4 credits)                                         Matthew M. McGowan
Horace: Odes (Adv. Lit. Core / Taught in Latin)             TF 2:30-3:45
Readings in and literary analysis of the Odes of Horace.

SPAN 3002 R01 (4 credits)                                                       Carl P. T. Fischer
Latin America: Literature and Culture Survey (Adv. Lit. Core)         TF 10:00-11:15
(May be applied to other groups depending on topic offered) The study of Spanish-American society through its cultural expressions: literature, art, music, film, and print journalism. To focus, in a given semester, on topics such as: "Literature and Art in Colonial Spanish America," "Literature and Film in Contemporary Spanish America," "Revolution in Spanish American Literature and Art," "Civilization and Barbarism," "National Identity, Race, and Gender in Spanish America," "Dictatorship and Resistance in Spanish America," and others. Taught in Spanish.

SPAN 3826 R01 (4 credits)                                Gioconda Marun
Latin American and World Literature                    MR 2:30-3:45
The couse will examine contemporary Latin American writers who are exploring the incursion in the world literature through relevant topics such as economic globalization, the influence of international films and concepts of probability and truth clarified by Godel in mathematics. This contemporary Latin American narrative wraps itself in an international space and produces a global narrative with a plurality of discourses and voices. Among the authors to be explored are: Ampuro, Fuguet, Martinez, Paszkowski, Volpi. Taught in Spanish.

WMST 3010 R01 (4 credits)                                                Judith Green
Feminist Theories in Intercultural Perspective (Pluralism)        MR 4:00-5:15
An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective.

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