Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


Lincoln Center Course Offerings

19869 COLI 2000 L01 (3 credits)                     
Fawzia Mustafa
Texts and Contexts: Women and Independence in Africa     
MW 1:00-2:15

We will examine African women’s literature, film and writing, regimes of gender on the continent, as well as women's place/role in processes of liberation, decolonization, and national independence.

22383 COLI 3519 L01 (4 credits)
Andrew H. Clark
Writing and Rewriting Seduction
MR 10:00-11:15


This class examines the theme of seduction and its relation to writing in European literature pre-1789. Writers include among others: Heloise and Abelard, Boccaccio, Marguerite de Navarre, Marvell, Castiglione, Lafayette, Casanova, Bastide, Crebillon fils, Laclos, and Sade in addition to critical works by Baudrillard, Paglia, and others.

22382 COLI 4011 L01 (4 credits)
Anne G. Hoffman
Narrating Childhood (EP 3 and Interdisciplinary Capstone)
T 2:30-5:15


This seminar seeks to understand the impact of childhood experience on development and identity, through study of literature, film, and psychoanalysis, using primary texts from the turn of the 19th century to the recent past. The intersection of psychoanalysis with modernism at the turn of the 20th century will be a focus of our inquiry: Freud’s understanding of infantile sexuality follows directly on his exploration of dreams as the royal road to the unconscious; at the same time, Joyce, Woolf, Proust explore literary avenues to engage the unconscious and the child’s imagination. Drawing on contemporary gender studies and feminist theory, the course examines the uses of narrative in psychoanalysis, literature, and film, to convey a complex continuum of development from early childhood to adulthood.

23201 COLI 4020 L01 (4 credits)

Fawzia Mustafa
Literature, Film and Development (Interdisciplinary Capstone, EP 3, COLI Capstone Seminar)
W 6:00-8:45

Development and underdevelopment are terms we now associate with the relative industrialization/ financialization of any given part of the world and the comparative disposition of their economic structures. They're used to differentiate the haves from the have nots, (North /South; First and Third worlds; metropole and postcolony). We will study Development and its discourse as it has emerged since the eighteenth century within humanist frameworks of philosophy/science, (the animal-human divide) literature (stories/narrative as colonial inscription), and technology (as techne and prostheses manifest in photography, film and video), to explore the ways it inflects our perceptions and ways we read our own and other worlds. In particular, we will focus on how Development/development has constructed and shaped the many significations of “the human” from the early modern to contemporary times.  This course fulfills the global studies distribution requirement.

Lincoln Center Cross Listed Courses

20175 ENGL 3045 L01 (4 credits)
Jordan A. Stein
Theory for English Majors
MR 10:00-11:15


This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself.

22417 ENGL 3530 L01 (4 credits)                       
Shoshana Enelow
Dramaturgy (Interdisciplinary Capstone)               
MR 2:30-3:45

The word dramaturgy, “the art or technique of dramatic composition or theatrical representation,” according to the Encyclopedia Britannica definition, describes a series of practices that include aspects ofplaywriting, directing, literary analysis, and theater history. This interdisciplinary seminar takes a capacious view of the practice of dramaturgy, approaching it as both a creative and a scholarly practice. As dramaturges, we will be literary and performance scholars, closely examining dramatic texts, and researching theater history, dramatic theory, and the cultural and historical contexts of works of drama; we will also work as practitioners, collaborating with our peers to translate diverse texts into theatrical events.

15691 ENGL 3843 (4 credits)                       
Anne G. Hoffman
Extraordinary Bodies (Values/ EP 4)                   
MR 2:30-3:45

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bodies from a variety of personal and social perspectives.

22186 MLAL 3624 L01 (4 credits)                   
Mohamed Abdel Rahman
Music & Nation in the Arab World                   
TF 10:00-11:15

Though music is a domain of individual expression, it may also reflect or respond to social, cultural and historic influences of a time and place. This course explores the ways in which music acts as an expression of national identity in the Arab world. It considers thisrelationship in a region where the idea of nation has multiple meanings, and where conflicting factors such as regional diversity and the notion of pan-Arabism exists. Specifically, the course focuses on how particular types of music, including the Aleppian, Waslah, Al-Qasida al-ghinaiy, and Al-Muwashah, have affected the development and embodiment of national identity in the 20th century. Course materials are presented in English, however students of Arabic language are encouraged to work with original texts.

10633 POSC 1100 L01 (3 credits)                       
Sarah P. Lockhart
Intro to Politics                                
TF 11:30-12:45


Introduces students to major approaches to the study of politics. Examines key political concepts such as power, democracy, and freedom; types of political actors, such as political parties, interest groups, and leaders; and important political institutions. Situates contemporary politics within social structure and history.

10629 POSC 3507 L01 (4 credits)                       
Amanda R. Taub
International Human Rights (Advanced Social Science Core)       
TF 1:00-2:15

An examination of the internation system for the protection of human rights: legal and political theory, cultural relativism, diplomatic protection and the concept of human rights law; legal instruments and institutions; substantive law.

10232 COMM 4001 L01 (4 credits)
Michael Tueth
Films of Moral Struggle (Values)                   
MW 10:00-11:15

20772 COMM 4001 L02 (4 credits)                   
Albert Auster
Films of Moral Struggle                           
T 2:30-5:15

20773 COMM 4001 L03 (4 credits)                   
Michael D. High
Films of Moral Struggle                           
TF 10:00-11:15

The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

17752 WMST 3010 L01 (4 credits)                  
Anne G. Hoffman
Feminist Theory in Inter. Cult. (Pluralism)               
MR 4:00-5:15

An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective.

22303 VART 3257 L01 (4 credits)                       
Mark F. Street
Seminar: Avant Garde Film/ Video                   
T 11:30-2:15

This studio course will explore the practice of current avant-garde film and video from a visual arts perspective. Various artists’ strategies for creating challenging work will be considered, including the use of abstraction, appropriated imagery, autobiographical detail, disjunctive sound image relationships and other aesthetic choices. The course will include field trips to view current experimental films and videos at museums, film festivals and art galleries.


22190 SPAN 3582 L01 (4 Credits)
Arnaldo Cruz-Malave
New York in Latino Literature and Film
MR 10:00-11:15

New York as represented and imagined by Spanish and Latin American immigrant and exile writers and by native Latino New Yorkers through literary texts (memoirs, urban chronicles, short fiction, poetry, andnovels), film, and performance art.  New York as a metaphor for modernity and the tension between artistic creation and the market, as a cosmopolitan center for the Spanish, Latin American and Latino avant-gardes, and as a new home for hybrid and transnational communities and neighborhoods.  To include writers such as Martí, Lorca, Julia de Burgos, Arenas, González, Thomas, Piñero, Pietri, Alvarez,Díaz, Leguizamo and Troyano.  (Applies to Spanish, LALS, Comp Lit andAmerican Studies majors.  A Pluralism Course.)   Conducted in Spanish with texts in Spanish and English.



Rose Hill Course Offerings

22438 COLI 3802 R01 (4 credits)
Chris GoGwilt
Literature and Imperialism (EP 3, Globalism)
MR 11:30-12:45


This course explores key debates in the study of literature and in the history of imperialism. Attention will be paid to the importance of literary form and historical representation as well as the relation between the two. A major concern of the course will be to examine the problems posed for any study of culture by legacies of imperialism. Readings will likely include Joseph Conrad, Mahasweta Devi, Nuruddin Farah, Rudyard Kipling, Tayeb Salih, Olive Schreiner, and Pramoedya Ananta Toer.

23300 COLI 4402 R01 (4 credits)
Philip T. Sicker
Novels of Ideas: 19th Century
TF 11:30-12:45


An intensive study of four major novels from the second half of the nineteenth century: Melville’s Moby Dick, Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina, Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, and Hardy’s Jude the Obscure. In exploring the ideological texture of these works, the course will consider the influence of such seminal figures as Schopenhauer, Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche, Zola, and Frazer.  This course is open to seniors, juniors, and sophomores.  

 

Rose Hill Cross Listed Courses
10508 COMM 4001 R01 (4 credits)
Michael Tueth
Films ofMoral Struggle (Values/EP 4)
TF 1:00-2:15

20826 COMM 4001 R02 (4 Credits)                       
Edward A. Wachtel
Films of Moral Struggle (Values/EP 4)                          
M 6:00-8:45


The course studies the portrayal of human values and moral choices both in the narrative content and the cinematic technique of outstanding films. Class discussion tends to explore ethical aspects of each film's issues, while numerous critical analyses of the films are offered to develop the student's appreciation of the film's artistic achievements. Lab fee.

19822 ENGL 3045 R01 (4 credits)                           
Moshe Gold
Theory for English Majors                           
TF 10:00-11:15


This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself.

22341 ENGL 3135 R01 (4 credits)                           
Thomas J. O’Donnell
Medieval Lit. 1000-1330 (Advanced Literature Core)                
TF 10:00-11:15


This course covers the literature of the period 1000-1330 in England, Wales, Ireland and Northern France in the context of spiritual reform, artistic innovation, political consolidation, and cultural exchange. Readings will include selections from all the major genres of high medieval literature: Arthurian romance and other courtly fictions, history and saga, the outrageous lives and afterlives of the saints, and lyric poetry in English and translated from Latin, Welsh, Irish, and French.

22349 ENGL 3138 R01 (4 credits)                           
Rebecca T. Sanchez
Late Modernism (Advanced Literature Core)                   
MR 11:30-12:45


Sandwiched between high modernism of the 1910’s and 20’s and the postmodern turn, texts produced between the 1930’s and 60’s often fall out of accounts of twentieth century literature. In this class, we will interrogate critical assumptions surrounding ideas about “late modernism,” and how re-invention and disenchantment can complicate and enrich our understanding of literary modernism. Our readings will include late works by writers who contributed to the first wave of modernist writing, as well as those by individuals whose careers began in its aftermath. Possible authors include: Jean Rhys, H.D. , Samuel Beckett, Carson McCullers, Djuna Barnes, Paul Celan, W.H. Auden, Gertrude Stein, James Joyce, David Jones, T.S. Eliot, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and George Oppen.

22343 ENGL 3239 R01 (4 credits)                            
Melanie D. Holm
The Rise of the Novel (Advanced Literature Core)                
TF 2:30-3:45


Following a century of civil wars, something very curious happens in England: Novels appear. People write them, publish them, read them and, most of all debate furiously about what novels are. In this course we will look at the rise of the novel in England, asking: Where did novels come from?

22330 ENGL 3337 R01 (4 credits)                           
Julie C. Kim
Caribbean Islands & Oceans (Interdisciplinary Capstone)           
MR 11:30-12:45


22331 ENGL 3337 R02 (4 credits)                           
Julie C. Kim
Caribbean Islands & Oceans (Interdisciplinary Capstone)           
MR 2:30-3:45


Islands and oceans: these geographic features have defined both the history of the Caribbean and imaginative writing about it. Drawing on work by cultural geographers, historians, anthropologists, literary scholars, and others, this course will examine novels,poetry, travel narratives, essays and films about the Caribbean from 1492 to the present. As we read, we will think about how authors have used the metaphors of island and ocean not only to portray the Caribbean as a paradise but also to critique the devastation of its peoples and ecologies by the forces of empire and colonialism.

22351 ENGL 3349 R01 (4 credits)                           
Keri G. Walsh
Modernism and Cinema (Advanced Literature Core)               
W 11:30-2:00


Virginia Woolf, T.S. Eliot, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, F. Scott Fitzgerald and many more: nearly all modernist writers had in common a fascination with film. In the first half of this course we focus on the cinema as an art form that challenged and inspired modernist writers to think in new ways about the purposes and techniques of their craft. We will read works such as Virginia Woolf’s 1926 essay “The Cinema,” which she composed while writing To the Lighthouse, and T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, which borrowed many cinematic techniques. We will also look at modernist writers who were directly involved in film making or writing for the screen, such as H.D. and Graham Greene. In the second half of the course, we look at how classic works of high modernism have been adapted for the screen. We will analyze paired readings of novels with their film adaptations including Ken Russell’s version of D.H. Lawrence’s Women in Love (1969), John Huston’s film of James Joyce’s The Dead (1987) Marleen Gorris’s Mrs. Dalloway (1997) and Stephen Daldry’s The Hours (2002).

22327 ENGL 3662 R01 (4 credits)                           
Daniel T. Contreras
Postwar U.S. Lit. & Culture (EP 3/ Interdisciplinary Capstone)           
W 11:30-2:00

This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.

18204 ENGL 3701 R01 (4 credits)                       
Cornelius Collins
American Writers in Paris (Advanced Lit. Core)               
TR 5:30-6:45


As a capital of modern Western culture, Paris has long been attractive to experimental artists from other countries, a home in exile to find supportive audiences, publishers, and collaborators. For American writers in the 20th century, this activity took place in roughly two movements: after WWI , the "Lost Generation" of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Stein and others, and after WWII a circle of African American authors including Wright, Baldwin, and Himes. Through a selection of their works, as well as the art and music of the period, this course will explore the creative aims and cultural contexts of these twoinnovative groups.

23368 ENGL 4403 R01 (4 credits)                       
Rebecca T. Sanchez
Extraordinary Bodies (Values/ EP 4)                   
MR 4:00-5:15


From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bodies from a variety of personal and social perspectives.

22125 SPAN 3001 R01 (4 credits)                       
Javier Jimenez-Belmonte
Spain: Lit. and Cult. Survey (Advanced Lit. Core/ taught in Spanish)   
MR 10:00-11:15

A broad survey of Spanish culture through the study of some of its major literary figures and texts. The course will examine representative texts from important artistic movements in Spain, such as the Renaissance, the baroque, neoclassicism, romanticism, realism and postmodernism. By the end of the course, students will be able to define the main characteristics of these movements and will be familiar with important literary figures, such as Garcilaso de la Vega, Calderón de la Barca, Lope de Vega, Moratín, Bécquer, Larra, Leopoldo Alas, Pardo Bazán, Antonio Machado, Unamuno, Ramón Sénder, Aleixandre and Martín Gaite. Students will also be familiar with Spanish history and its relationship to the cultural field.

22451 SPAN 3850 R01 (4 credits)                       
Cynthia M. Vich
Narrating the City (Advanced Lit. Core/ taught in Spanish        
MR 11:30-12:45

The course uses Spanish, Latin American and United States Latino texts and films to discuss the representation of contemporary urban spaces such as Madrid, Buenos Aires, Mexico City, Havana, Lima and New York. Issues such as globalization, migration from the country to the city, urban subcultures and urban politics will be discussed in relation to readings from authors such as Garcia Lorca, Monsivais, Arlt, Borges, Pglia, Ribeyro, Pacheco, Garcia Canclini, Sanchez, Fusco, and filmmakers such as Nielinsky, Gonzalez Inarritu.

16807 WMST 3010 R01 (4 credits)                   
TBA
Feminist Theories in Intercultural Perspective (Pluralism)       
TBA


An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age. Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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