Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


Back to Undergraduate Programs

Business Economics Concentration for GSB Students










The Business Economics Concentration for GSB Students


 
Economics is a challenging discipline that offers students a clear and concise way of analyzing a wide variety of issues in economics and business.
 
There are many reasons to concentrate in economics:
 
Many job recruiters are favorably disposed toward students who have selected economics as a concentration.
 
Since business constitutes a special area in applied economics, many of the courses offered in an MBA program utilize tools developed by economists. A student planning to attend a demanding graduate business program will have a competitive advantage by having studied economics at the undergraduate level.
 
Many law schools believe that economics provides an excellent preparation for the study of law; economics takes a logical, ordered approach to problems and also introduces the student to concepts and issues, e.g., government regulation, corporation finance, business concentration, which are presented in a number of courses in law school.

 
Are you Interested in Finance?

If you are interested in Finance, then you should consider what you mean by “Finance”. Are you interested in managing the financial, internal aspects of a particular corporation? Or are you thinking of working on Wall Street as a security analyst, evaluating the financial positions of companies and picking stocks to recommend?
 
If you are interested in the micro aspects of finance, the “finance function” of a company, then you will start off with accounting courses, and move on to take Financial Management (debt, equity) and Corporate Financial Policy, which is an advanced financial management course.  You would also be interested in Mergers and Acquisitions, which deals with the internal aspect of an enlarging corporation or in Financial Management of Multinational Firms. One course from the Economics Department that would complement this micro approach to finance would be Managerial Economics.  Managerial Economics provides a micro theory framework for business decisions and management.
 
Even if you are interested primarily in the finance function of a corporation, you need to realize that a corporation operates in an economic setting.   The Money and Banking course offered in the Economics Department studies the institutions and operations of our commercial banking system. Remember that banks are the major lenders to corporations and so students interested in the finance function of a corporation should have a thorough understanding of the banking system, the creation and allocation of money and credit and the role of the Federal Reserve Bank.  Students interested in the finance function of a corporation should also be aware of the impact that monetary policy can have on inflation, unemployment and economic growth, all of which will affect the individual corporation. The Economics Department offers a course in Macroeconomic Analysis that studies the impact of monetary policy.
 
So, if you are interested in the finance function of a particular corporation and plan on a finance concentration, consider a secondary concentration in Business Economics or a minor in Economics from  FordhamCollege.

Three courses we recommend are:

  • Managerial Economics
  • Money and Banking
  • Macroeconomic Analysis
If you are interested in finance, but are thinking of Wall Street and the stock market, then an economics background becomes imperative. You will need the tools to enable you to evaluate the financial positions of companies in changing economic conditions. The ability to analyze, a tool that economics classes develop, will be extremely important.  One way to distinguish yourself from your peers is to select a primary concentration in Business Economics
and a secondary concentration in Finance.

The primary concentration in Business Economics requires that you take:
  • Macroeconomic Analysis
  • Microeconomic Theory
  • Two upper level economics courses
 
These two upper level courses could be drawn from the following Economics Department courses focused on finance:
  • Financial Markets
  • Issues in Financial Markets
  • International Finance
  • Emerging Financial Markets
 
Then the secondary concentration in Finance requires three courses from GSB that could be selected from:
  • Investment and Security Analysis
  • Portfolio Management
  • Options and Futures
  • International Investment
 
Finally GSB students are allowed to take four liberal arts electives and one business elective.  The four liberal arts electives could focus on additional finance courses in economics or on such fundamentals as Money and Banking.   Notice that with careful planning, a GSB student could take a primary concentration in Business Economics and then use free liberal arts electives to select three more economics courses.  This would be equivalent to an Economics major from Fordham College. (Economics majors have five economics electives.)  One could have the benefits of a pre-professional program (the GSB core) with the strengths of a liberal arts degree in economics.
 
The primary concentration in Business Economics requires:
  • Macroeconomic Analysis
  • Microeconomic Theory
  • Two upper level economics courses
 
The secondary concentration in Business Economics requires:
  • Three EC 3000 level electives
 
The Minor in Economics from  Fordham College for GSB students requires:

  • Three EC 3000 level electives

Questions?

Contact

Prof. Burke
Department of Economics
Dealy 508
mburke@fordham.edu

Site  | Directories
Submit Search Request