Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


ackerphoto
People

Sarah Zimmerman
Associate Professor
Department of English
Fordham University

Sarah Zimmerman is author of Romanticism, Lyricism, and History (SUNY 1999) and is currently completing a study of the Romantic public lecture on literature. Both projects reflect her interest in reading various genres in relationship to historical audiences, and in the intersection of the period's emphasis on interiority with the vibrancy and informing presence of its reading publics. That work includes essays on the poetry of Charlotte Smith and John Clare, the drama of Percy Bysshe Shelley, and the lectures of Coleridge.

zimmerman@fordham.edu

John Bugg

Assistant Professor
Department of English
Fordham University

John Bugg’s interests include legal and political history, Romantic-era print culture, slavery and abolitionism, form and politics, folk hero literature, and the cultural history of charisma. His essays and reviews have appeared in PMLA, Eighteenth-Century Studies, The Huntington Library Quarterly, Romanticism, and European Romantic Review. He is currently at work on a book project entitled Five Long Winters that examines the relations between literary culture and political repression at the end of the eighteenth century. He is also putting together an edition of the correspondence of publisher and bookseller Joseph Johnson.

bugg@fordham.edu 


Nicholas Birns

Multiyear Lecturer in Literature
Eugene Lang College, the New School

Nicholas Birns is interested in Romanticism's relation to history and theory. His forthcoming book, Theory After Theory (Broadview Press, 2010) is a fresh overview of contemporary theory that emphasizes the role that the foregrounding of nineteenth century texts plays in theory's disciplinary rise. Earlier essays in Romanticism were on Anna Laetitia Barbauld, John Clare, and Percy Shelley. He teaches a two-semester sequence at Eugene Lang College on the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century British novel. He is also interested in colonial Romanticism and the afterlife of Romanticism in Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.


Elizabeth Campbell Denlinger
Curator
Carl H. Pforzheimer Library

Elizabeth Denlinger received her Ph.D. from NYU; her thesis centered on novels by Mary Wollstonecraft and her circle. After working for nine years at Shelley and his Circle (Harvard University Press, 1961-, 10 vols. to date) she became a rare books curator, first at the Morgan Library & Museum, and then at the New York Public Library where she is curator of the Carl H. Pforzheimer Collection of Shelley and His Circle. She is the author of a number of articles on book collecting and collectors, and sexuality in eighteenth-century Britain. In 2005 she curated an exhibition at the New York Public Library, Before Victoria: Extraordinary Women of the British Romantic Era; and wrote the companion volume of the same title, published by Columbia University Press. At present she is collaborating on a number of projects with Oxford’s Bodleian Library to bring together, both digitally and in exhibitions, the Bodleian’s Shelley collections with the Pforzheimer Collection.


William Galperin

Professor
Department of English
Rutgers University, New Brunswick

William Galperin has taught at Rutgers since 1983, and is the author of three books: Revision and Authority in Wordsworth: The Interpretation of a Career (1989), The Return of the Visible in British Romanticism (1993), and The Historical Austen (2003). He is currently at work on a project on the history of missed opportunities and the discovery of the ordinary in romantic-period writing. 


Erik Gray

Assistant Professor
Department of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

Author of The Poetry of Indifference: From the Romantics to the Rubáiyát (2005), and Milton and the Victorians (2009).


Colin Jager

Assistant Professor
Department of English
Rutgers University, New Brunswick

Colin Jager’s interests include romanticism, secularism, religion, theory, and cognitive science. He is author of The Book of God: Secularization and Design in the Romantic Era (UPenn Press, 2007), and his recent articles include "A Poetics of Dissent; or, Pantisocracy in America"; Theory and Event (2007), "Romanticism /Secularization/ Secularism"; Blackwell Literature Compass (2008), and "Byron and Romantic Occidentalism,"; Romantic Circles Praxis, forthcoming. He is starting work on a book tentatively called Secularism and Romanticism, and is also interested in cognitive approaches to literature.


Alice Levine
Professor
Department of English
Hofstra University

Editor of the new Norton Critical Edition of Byron’s Poetry and Prose, and co-editor, with Jerome J. McGann, of Manuscripts of the Younger Romantics: A Facsimile of Manuscripts in the Pierpont Morgan Library. Poems in the Autograph of Lord Byron Once in the Possession of Countess Guiccioli: Volume  I, Poems, 1807–1818; Volume II, Don Juan, Cantos I–V; Volume  III, Poems, 1819–1822; Volume IV, Miscellaneous Poems, and co-editor with Robert N. Keane of Rereading Byron: Essays Selected From Hofstra University’s Byron Bicentennial Conference. She has also published several essays about Byron, including studies focusing on Byron and music, and is currently working on Verdi's I due Foscari (based on Byron's play).



Peter Manning

Professor
Department of English
Stony Brook University 

Peter Manning’s works include Byron and His Fictions (Wayne State UP) and Reading Romantics (Oxford UP). Manning is also co-editor, with Susan Wolfson, of Selected Poems of Byron (Penguin), Selected Poems of Hood, Praed, and Beddoes (Penguin and University of Pittsburgh), and of the Romantics and Their Contemporaries: Volume 2A of the Longman Anthology of British Literature


Maureen N. McLane

Associate Professor
Department of English
NYU

Maureen N. McLane is is the author of Balladeering, Minstrelsy, and the Making of British Romantic Poetry (Cambridge UP, 2008), Romanticism and the Human Sciences: poetry, population, and the discourse of the species (Cambridge UP, 2000), and co-editor of The Cambridge Companion to British Romantic Poetry (CUP,2008). Her book of poems, Same Life, was just published by Farrar, Strausand Giroux. She has taught at Harvard, MIT, and the University of Chicago; among her research interests are poetry and poetics, romanticism and the history of media, balladeering, and the case of Scotland.


Wendy C. Nielsen

Assistant Professor
Department of English
Montclair State University

Wendy C. Nielsen teaches European Romanticism, comparative literature, drama, science fiction, world literature, and other subjects. She is interested in German, French, and British drama in the Romantic era, and women's roles in the French Revolution. She has written about Charlotte Corday (the assassin of Jean Paul Marat) in Comparative Drama (2006) and British dramas about the warrior queen, Boadicea (Studies in English Literature 2009); as well as articles about Elizabeth Inchbald (European Romantic Review 2006); Olympe de Gouges and Rousseau (The Eighteenth Century 2002); and pedagogical strategies for teaching Romantic drama (Romantic Pedagogy Commons 2011).


Janice Peritz

Associate Professor
Department of English
Queens College

A specialist in rhetoric, composition, and British cultural studies 1750-1850, Janice Peritz received her B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania (1970) and her Ph.D. from Stanford University (1978). For the past twenty-five years, she has been involved in college teaching, curriculum development, and program administration, first as an Assistant Professor at the University of Texas at Austin, later as Chair of Beaver College's English, Theatre, and Communications Department, and since 1989, as Associate Professor of English at Queens College, CUNY. At Queens, she directed the Honors College for three years and the Composition Program for thirteen years; working with others, she also developed thecollege’s writing across the curriculum requirement. She is co-author of The Practice of Writing (St. Martin's, 1994/2001), three editions of A Writer’s Resource (McGraw Hill, 2008), two editions of The New McGraw-Hill Handbook (2009)as well as two other college writing guides. In addition, she was published a number of book chapters, journal articles, scholarly reviews, and conference papers in the areas of undergraduate education, writing across the curriculum, feminist studies, contemporary critical theory, and British literature. Currently she is writing on Wollstonecraft and the ethics of alterity.


Alexander Schlutz
Professor
Department of English
John Jay College

Author of Mind’s World: Imagination and the Modern Subject, which investigates the role of imagination in philosophical and literary models of subjectivity from Descartes to the Romantics (forthcoming 2009); and co-founder and editor-in-chief of the German on-line journal parapluie (http://parapluie.de), which has been publishing essays on literature, culture, the arts and philosophy on the internet since 1997.


Sheila A. Spector
Independent Scholar
New York City

Sheila A. Spector's primary scholarly interest is the intersection between Romanticism and Judaica. Since receiving the M.A. in Comparative Literature, and the Ph.D. inBritish Literature, both from the University of Maryland, she has completed several multi-volume projects. For the first, focusing on the influence of Jewish mysticism on Blake, she has published Jewish Mysticism: An Annotated Bibliography on the Kabbalah in English (Garland, 1984), as well as the companion volumes "Glorious incomprehensible": The Development of Blake's Kabbalistic Language and "Wonders Divine": The Development of Blake's Kabbalistic Myth (both published by Bucknell University Press, 2001). For her second project, the mutual interaction between Romanticism and Judaica, she has edited Benjamin Disraeli's novel Alroy (Romantic Circles Electronic Editions, 2005), as well as two collections of essays: British Romanticism and the Jews: History, Literature, Culture (Palgrave/Macmillan, 2002; pbk. 2008), and The Jews and British Romanticism: Politics, Religion, Literature (Palgrave/Macmillan, 2005). Currently, she has completed drafts of two books – “I give you the end of a golden string”: A Kabbalistic Guide to Blake’s Jerusalem and Byron and the Jews: A Study in Translation. Finally, she is in the process of compiling a third volume of essays, Romanticism and "The Jewish Question.” During the past few years, Spector has taught part-time in a number of New York institutions.


Alan Vardy
Associate Professor
Department of English
Hunter College

Author of John Clare, Politics and Poetry (2004). His new book, Constructing Coleridge: the Posthumous Life of the Author is forthcoming in 2010. He will soon begin research on a project involving the relation between walking and cognition (including work on DeQuincey, Clare, urban peripatetics, and Coleridge's Bristol circle).


Joshua Wilner
Professor, English and Comparative Literature
CUNY

Joshua Wilner teaches English and Comparative Literature at City College and The Graduate Center and is the author of Feeding on Infinity: Readings in the Romantic Rhetoric of Internalization (Hopkins, 2000). His essays have appeared in various journals and collections, most recently, “Experimental Prose and the Reconfiguration of Incestuous Bonds: from the Grasmere Journal to Tender Buttons” in Eoagh, no. 7 (2012); “’Communicating with Objects’: Romanticism, Skepticism, and ‘The Specter of Animism’ in Cavell and Wordsworth,” in Stanley Cavell and Literary Studies: Consequences of Skepticism, ed. Richard Eldridge and Bernie Rhie (Continuum, 2011); and "Wordsworth's Cliff-hanger" in Romantic Autobiography in England, ed. Eugene Stelzig (Ashgate, 2009). Current projects include Wordsworth and Mandelbrot on the Coast of Britain: Romantic Poetics and the Fractal Geometry of Nature and Thinking in Pieces: Pascal, Dickinson, Wittgenstein. jwilner@ccny.cuny.edu


Fiona Wilson
Visiting Assistant Professor
Sarah Lawrence College

Fiona Wilson’s primary research focus is on Romanticism and Scotland. Her additional areas of interest include gender and sexuality, nationalism, cosmopolitan and transnational identities, modern Scottish literature, and poetry. Her articles and reviews are published in: Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Poetry (EUP, 2009), The Byron Journal (2007, 2008), Edinburgh Companion to Contemporary Scottish Literature (EUP, 2007), Romanticism's Debatable Lands (Palgrave, 2007), International Journal of Scottish Writing (2007), Keats-Shelley Journal (2007, 2005), Pequod (2006) and forthcoming from the Modern Language Association. She is former Chair of the Scottish Literature Discussion Group of the MLA.


Celest Woo
Asst Prof of English
SUNY Empire State College

Celest Woo teaches Romanticism, Shakespeare, writing, children's/young adult literature, Asian American studies, and other subjects.  She is the author of Romantic Actors and Bardolatry: Performing Shakespeare from Garrick to Kean (Peter Lang, 2008), and an article on Sarah Siddons and Hamlet in European Romantic Review.  She has also just published a poetry chapbook, Burnished Sol (Pudding House, 2009).  She is interested in Romantic theatre and drama.

 
 
   
 

Site  | Directories
Submit Search Request