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Fall 2012 Undergraduate English Courses









 
 Undergraduate Courses - Fall 2012
 
  Fordham College at Rose Hill
 
  Required
  Pre-1800 courses
  Post-1800 courses
  SENIOR VALUES courses
  Creative Writing Courses
   
 
  Fordham College at Lincoln Center
 
  Required
  pre-1800 courses
  POST-1800 courses
  CROSS LISTED Courses
  Creative Writing Courses
  GRADUATE Writing Courses
   
 
  GRADUATE COURSES OPEN TO UNDERGRADUATES
   
   Fall 2012 Book list  (TBD will posted here) 
   
 
Fordham College at Rose Hill
Junior Theory Requirement at Rose Hill:
Theory for English Majors ENGL 3045-R01 GoGwilt, C.
NOTE: This course is cross listed with Literary Studies.
This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices and language itself. We recommend that this course be taken in the junior year if possible. This course is also open to Comparative Literature students who may take this course in place of COLI 3000.
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 11190
 
Pre-1800 Courses at Rose Hill:
Medieval Monsters & Marvels ENGL 3031-R01 June, R.
Pre-1800, Advanced Literature Core
Like the vampires and aliens of today’s popular culture, the giants, monsters, and fantastic beings that populate the pages of medieval texts stretched the boundaries of the known world and challenged categories of identity. Reading a variety of sources, from travel narratives to devotional texts, this course will examine the place of the marvelous in the medieval imagination.
  MR 10:00-11:15

CRN 15758
 
Chaucer ENGL 3107-R01 Kelemen, E.
Pre-1800, Advanced Literature Core
This course will examine Chaucer’s major work, The Canterbury Tales, as well as his earlier love poems. We will be spending most of the semester on the Canterbury Tales so that we can explore the range of Chaucer’s writings – his romances, bawdy stories, moral tales, and saints’ lives. There will be two main goals: to pay close attention to Chaucer’s poetry (and, therefore, to become familiar with Middle English) and to discuss the larger concerns to which Chaucer returned again and again – the position of women, social disruption, religious belief, the politics of the court, and the challenge of writing.
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 18039
 
Medieval Romance ENGL 3111-R01 June, R.
Pre-1800, Advanced Literature Core/EP3
A study of romance's durable popular appeal, this course examines texts from the 12th to 15th centuries and compares them with later romance traditions.
  TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 18038
 
Medieval Romance ENGL 3111-R02 June, R.
Pre-1800, Advanced Literature Core/EP3
A study of romance's durable popular appeal, this course examines texts from the 12th to 15th centuries and compares them with later romance traditions.
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 19265
 
Medieval Tolerance/Intolerance ENGL 3131-R01 Wogan-Browne J.
Pre-1800
The adjective ‘medieval’ is sometimes used to mean ‘barbarous’ , ‘primitive’, etc in modern speech. This course examines a range of medieval writings for their representations of social and political order; Western Christendom’s insiders and outsiders; medieval thought on poverty and labor; tolerance and intolerance regarding gender roles and sexual mores, and representations of the world outside the boundaries of medieval Europe. The course provides opportunities to read important medieval poems and other texts: to extend our capacity for historical judgment and empathy; and to think with greater detachment about our own times and assumptions. We will draw material principally from major writers of medieval England as well as from some secondary studies.
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 15771
 
Love in the Middle Ages  ENGL 3134-R01 O'Donnell, T. 
Pre-1800 , Advanced Literature Core/EP3
The concept of romantic love – what love is, do you have it, how you get it if you don’t, – preoccupies contemporary western society and art. Yet this kind of love only entered into western discourses around the turn of the first millennium – and then taking it over almost completely. In the class, we will ask the questions, what is the new discourse of love in the Middle Ages like, and how does it impinge on our understanding of love in the present? Readings will include selections from classical poetry, medieval spiritual tracts, and medieval poetry translated from Latin, Occitan, Arabic, and French.
  TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 18058
 
Shakespeare ENGL 3206-R01 McEleney, C.
Pre-1800, Advanced Literature Core
Poetry and plays studied in relation to Renaissance and 20th-century concerns and ideologies. Emphasis on Shakespeare and his works read and constructed in regard to power, class, gender, and literary aesthetics.
  MR 10:00-11:15

CRN 15762
 
Romanticism & Confession ENGL 3339-R01 Bugg, J.
Pre-1800, Advanced Literature Core, Pre-requisite ENGL 2000
I have freely told both the good and the bad, have hid nothing wicked, added nothing good.” So writes Jean-Jacques Rousseau in his Famous Confessions, a groundbreaking autobiography that presented the author to the world in all of his glories and frailties. The Romantic period witnessed a breathtaking range of autobiographical writing, and at the heart of this literature we find the language of confession. Not only a willful decision to make the private public, confession also includes legal testimony and other modes of coerced or enforced revelation, prophesies, and even the wild ravings of flashing-eyed poets. What becomes of one’s self-identity through the process of confession? Can a confession come without remorse or contrition? How do we understand the delicate balance between what is revealed and whatis concealed,what is confessed and what is harbored from view? Our readings will include Romantic-era autobiographical works such as Thomas De Quincey’s Confessions of an English Opium Eater, James Hogg’s The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, Mary Wollstonecraft’s Letters Written in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, poetic and fictional works, such as William Wordsworth’s Prelude and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and key texts in the long history of confession, from St. Augustine to Michel Foucault.
  TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 18059
 
Early Caribbean Literature ENGL 3584-R01 Kim, J.C.
Pre-1800, Advanced Literature Core
Since 1492 Europeans have alternated between imagining the Caribbean as a tropical paradise or as a land of dangerous savagery. This course will examine British writing about the Caribbean from the sixteenth through early nineteenth century in order to understand the ways in which authors thought about and represented cultural and ethnic difference, colonialism, slavery, and other issues related to imperial expansion. It will also look at some of the earliest works produced by authors who lived in the Caribbean and participated in the emergence of new Caribbean literary forms.
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 18053
 
Four Comic Novels ENGL 3899-R01 Holm, M.
Pre-1800, Advanced Literature Core
Together we will read four comic novels that span four centuries of western civilization, asking ourselves why their authors wanted to make their readers laugh and how they did so. Beginning with Rabelais’s enormously funny Gargantuan and Pantagruel (1532-1564), we will consider how humor does and does not shift over time, the selection and connotations of comic objects, the relationship of comical narratives and reader participation, the influence of politics, epistemology, and culture on narrative strategy, and try to conceive of the relationships that have existed between laughter and novelty, as well as how these relationships have shaped that body of literature that we now call novels.
  TF 2:30-3:45

CRN 18061
 
Bible in English Poetry ENGL 4135-R01 Chase Fr.
Pre-1800, Senior Values
This course studies some of the books of the Bible which have been most influential on English literature, together with English poetry and critical texts, from the Middle Ages to the present, which have been influenced by these biblical books. We will study the various English versions of the Bible and their backgrounds, but the focus will be on the Authorized Version (“King James Bible”) of 1611. The course will proceed sequentially through the Bible from Genesis through Revelation. At each class meeting we will discuss a key biblical text alongside a variety of poems, from all periods, inspired by or related to it.
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 18035
 
Post-1800 Courses at Rose Hill:
Latin America Short Story ENGL 3036-R01 Contreras, D.
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core
Writings by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes and Mario Vargas Llosa(to name just a few) are some of the treasures of world literature. This course will focus on the short story and novella forms in order to explore as fully as possible the full range of Latin American and Latino literature. Literary geographies will include Mexico, the Caribbean, Central & South America, with special sections on Cuba, Argentina, Chile and Brazil. All readings will be in English.
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 18057
 
Jane Austen in Context ENGL 3410--R01 Greenfield, S.
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core
An intensive study of Jane Austen's novels and times.
  TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 18041
 
Victorian Novel ENGL 3437-R01 McElligott, M.
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core
This course traces the development of the Victorian Novel from its origins in the Romanticism of the Brontes (Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre), through the three major novelists of the period: Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy, to the dissolution of the age, as reflected in Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray and Samuel Butler's The Way of All Flesh.
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 18055
 
American Modernism ENGL 3438-R01 Sanchez, R.
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core
This course introduces forms of literary experimentation associated with the modernist movement, including authors such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, William Faulkner, Gertrude Stein, Nella Larsen, Jean Toomer and others. We’ll examine such contexts as Harlem Renaissance, American writers in Paris, southern agrarianism, and others, as a way of grasping modernism’s fascination with difficulty.
  TF 2:30-3:45

CRN 18062
 
Disobedience in Literature ENGL 3467-R01 Caldwell, M.
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core/EP3
"Of man's first disobedience" ---so begins John Milton's epic poem. Paradise Lost. Milton was not alone on having his interest sparked: The concept of disobedience in its various permutations (literary, social, political, psychological, religious) has energized a wide variety of literary works.  One might say that without some form of disobedience there could be no storytelling. Some of the questions that will shape our explorations in this course include: when disobedience is heroic, and when it is destructive or regrettable? What is the difference between disobeying your family and disobeying law? Can an obedient character be interesting? How are the different modes of authority (religious, juridical, familial), played off against one another in order to license behavior? Using disobedience as our master rubric, we will follow important continuities and innovative changes in literary history across the past three centuries.
  R 2:30-4:29

CRN 18049
 
Modern Drama--Moral Crucible ENGL 3531-R01 Harrington, J.
Post-1800, Senior Values Seminar
After the French Revolution great European playwrights fashioned new plots, banished royalty from the cast of characters and made the theater an arena for moral and political conflict. Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov and Shaw bring us up to date on whistleblowers, women's rights, class struggle, weapons of mass destruction and total war. We will attend at least one professional production. Senior Values Seminar requirement. Elective in English, Literary Studies and Women's Studies.
  T 2:30-4:59

CRN 18048
 
British Modernism ENGL 3534-R01 Kerins, F.
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core
In 1922 Eliot’s The Wasteland and Joyce’s Ulysses established a radically new perspective for literature—one that has dominated the twentieth century. How this new viewpoint evolved and who contributed to it will be the matter of this class. In prose, poetry and drama we will explore the changes that revolutionized English literature in every genre.
  TF 8:30-9:45

CRN 18056
 
Major American Authors ENGL 3653-R01 TBA
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core
This  course  provides  an  introduction  to  major  American  authors,  including  Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Dickinson, Whitman, James, Wharton, and others.
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 15761
 
Postwar U.S. Literature & Culture ENGL 3662-R01 Collins, C.
Post 1800, Advanced Literature Core/EP3/ Interdisciplinary Capstone
This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 18050
 
Postwar U.S. Literature & Culture ENGL 3662-R02 Collins, C.
Post 1800, Advanced Literature Core/EP3/ Interdisciplinary Capstone
This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.
  TR 5:30-6:45

CRN 18052
 
Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Literature ENGL 3930-R01 TBA
Post-1800 Elective
This course will read texts by a diverse range of Anglophone authors, emphasizing the cultural history of same-sex identity and desire, heteronormativity and oppression, and queer civil protest. It will also consider the problems of defining a queer literary canon, introduce the principles of queer theory, and interrogate the discursive boundaries between the political and the personal.
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 18037
 
The Poet's Choice ENGL 4018-R01 Hassett C.
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core - EP3
"The Poet's Choice" explores the history and practice of English language poetry. The aim is to provide the historical grounding that enables students to talk knowledgeably and write convincingly about the options whereby individual artists - from the earliest canonical authors to the 21st century American Laureates - make aesthetic choices. The syllabus includes English and American poety, literary criticism, and recent reviews in print and online. This EP course emphasizes close reading, luminous critical writing, and good talking.
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 18033
 
The Poet's Choice ENGL 4018-R01 Hassett C.
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core - EP3
"The Poet's Choice" explores the history and practice of English language poetry. The aim is to provide the historical grounding that enables students to talk knowledgeably and write convincingly about the options whereby individual artists - from the earliest canonical authors to the 21st century American Laureates - make aesthetic choices. The syllabus includes English and American poety, literary criticism, and recent reviews in print and online. This EP course emphasizes close reading, luminous critical writing, and good talking.
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 18034
 
Hobbits/Heroes/Hubris ENGL 4096-R01  Kavros, H.
Post-1800 Elective, Senior Values
This course will examine various incarnations of the Western hero: archaic Greek, Patriarchal, Christian, Romance, and Germanic. We will consider the literary and historical contexts of the Iliad, Genesis, John, Don Quixote, and Beowulf before seeing how the Hobbit fits in this tradition.
  MR 8:30-9:45

CRN 18032
 
New York City Fiction ENGL 4121-R01 Cornell-Goldwitz, E.
Post-1800, Advanced Literature Core
This course will explore both short stories and novels written in and about New York City during the 20th century.
  TR 5:30-6:45

CRN 15745
 
Four Modern Catholic Writers ENGL 4129-R01 Giannone R.
Post-1800, Senior Values
This seminar will consider the writings of Dorothy Day (1897-1980), Thomas Merton (1915-1968), Flannery O’Connor (1925-1964), and Walker Percy (1916-1990). These four authors, whoarguably can be termed reformers as well as artists in their own right, are the principal critics of the modern Catholic predicament before and after World War II. Each in her or his way saw a church in drastic need of rebuilding and sought to restore what had collapsed and had been left unheeded by what was essentially an immigrant institution.
  T 2:30-4:59

CRN 11206
 
Comparative Studies in Revolution COLI 4205-R01/
ENGL 4206-R01
GoGwilt, C.
Capstone SeminarEP3/global studies/Interdisciplinary
This interdisciplinary capstone seminar engages students in a series of literary and historical studies of revolutionary (and counter-revolutionary) movements (e.g. the Haitian revolution of 1791, the Indian Rebellion of 1857, and the events of 1965 in Indonesia). Examining historical documents, works of fiction, literary theory and historiography, the seminar will investigate how the disciplines of history, literary criticism, and cultural studies more generally, seek to explain revolutionary historical change. Particular attention will be paid to the authority of textual evidence placed within interdisciplinary, cross- cultural, and multi-media contexts.
  R 2:30-5:15

CRN 18063
 
Senior Values at Rose Hill:
Modern Drama--Moral Crucible ENGL 3531-R01 Harrington, J.
Post-1800, Senior Values Seminar
After the French Revolution great European playwrights fashioned new plots, banished royalty from the cast of characters and made the theater an arena for moral and political conflict. Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov and Shaw bring us up to date on whistleblowers, women's rights, class struggle, weapons of mass destruction and total war. We will attend at least one professional production. Senior Values Seminar requirement. Elective in English, Literary Studies and Women's Studies.
  T 2:30-4:59

CRN 18048
 
Hobbits/Heroes/Hubris ENGL 4096-R01 Kavros, H.
Post-1800 Elective, Senior Values
This course will examine various incarnations of the Western hero: archaic Greek, Patriarchal, Christian, Romance, and Germanic. We will consider the literary and historical contexts of The Iliad, Genesis, John, Don Quixote, and Beowulf before seeing how the Hobbit fits in this tradition.
  MR 8:30-9:45

CRN 18032
 
Bible in English Poetry ENGL 4135-R01 Chase, M.
Pre-1800, Senior Values
This course studies some of the books of the Bible which have been most influential on English literature, together with English poetry and critical texts, from the Middle Ages to the present, which have been influenced by these biblical books. We will study the various English versions of the Bible and their backgrounds, but the focus will be on the Authorized Version (“King James Bible”) of 1611. The course will proceed sequentially through the Bible from Genesis through Revelation. At each class meeting we will discuss a key biblical text alongside a variety of poems, from all periods, inspired by or related to it.
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN18035
 
Four Modern Catholic Writers ENGL 4129-R01 Giannone R.
Post-1800, Senior Values
This seminar will consider the writings of Dorothy Day (1897-1980), Thomas Merton (1915-1968), Flannery O’Connor (1925-1964), and Walker Percy (1916-1990). These four authors, who arguably can be termed reformers as well as artists in their own right, are the principal critics of the modern Catholic predicament before and after World War II. Each in her or his way saw a church in drastic need of rebuilding and sought to restore what had collapsed and had been left unheeded by what was essentially an immigrant institution.
  T 2:30-4:59

CRN 11206
 
Creative Writing Courses at Rose Hill:
Duende: Capture Poetic Pulse ENGL 3029-R01 Gambito, S.
Federico Garcia Lorca said, "Thus duende is a power and not a behavior, it is a struggle and not a concept. I have heard an old master guitarist say: 'Duende is not in the throat; duende surges up from the soles of the feet.' Which means it is not a matter of ability, but of real live form; of blood; of ancient culture; of creative action." In this workshop we will consider what literary devices engender creative action and duende in poetry. We will not only explore the forms that poems take but also the processes by which poets come to their poems. Students will be expected to explore their own sources of inspiration, write a series of poems and make presentations.   TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 18040
 
Writing the City ENGL 3069-R01 Caldwell, M.
In this class we'll be reading (and writing) fiction, literary non-fiction, and poetry about urban life. Readings will center on three cities: New York, Paris, and Cairo.   W 11:30-1:59

CRN 18060
 
Experimental Ink ENGL 3074-R01 Kupperman, K.
“The true method of knowledge is experiment,” said William Blake. In this course we will read authors such as Anne Carson, Sherman Alexie, Gertrude Stein, Robert Walser, David Small, and Maria Kalman, whose work crosses genres, blends media, and breaks the boundaries of form through invention and experiment. We will write about and create collaborative and experimental forms of nonfiction, including lyric essays, installations, poems, artist’s books, graphic memoir, visual essays, and autobiographical documentary.   MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 18036
 
Humor: Punch Up Your Prose ENGL 3079-R01 TBA

Did you hear the one about the creative writing student who blended strong prose with a sense of humor? Probably not, since so many don’t. Or maybe they just don’t think they’re allowed. In this workshop setting, you’ll learn to inject humor into your prose by connecting with your comic voice. We’ll begin by reading and discussing the work of legendary wits including James Thurber and Dorothy Parker, as well as contemporary humorists such as David Sedaris, Nora Ephron, Dave Barry, and Sloane Crosley. Writing assignments will help strengthen your voice across four basic forms: the comic essay, the comic novel or short story, the topical news column, and the parody piece. We’ll also do some in-class exercises designed to shake off preconceived notions of “serious” prose, and help you find the funny in the characters, dialogue, and situations you create. Whether your goal is to write a Shouts and Murmurs piece for The New Yorker, a post for  Funnyordie.com, or begin a book-length humor collection, the first step is the same: take your sense of humor seriously.

  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 19279
 
First Flint: Creative Process ENGL 3096-R01 Gambito, S.

In this course we will engage in the process of writing and determining what makes for studious creative process. As we embark on a series of exercises involving journals, objects, language, dream, memory, body, and the world, we will explore the means by which language is generated and shaped. Although you will never be required to write in any particular genre, you will be exposed to poetry, fiction, and drama and you will begin to see how these distinctions are often less helpful than they seem.

  TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 18042
 
Fordham College at Lincoln Center
Required Courses at Lincoln Center:
Theory for English Majors ENGL 3045-C01 Bennett, A.
Fulfills ENGL Theory requirement
This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself.
  T 6:00-8:45

CRN 18633
 
Pre-1800 Courses at Lincoln Center:
Chaucer ENGL 3107-L01 Albin, A.
Advanced Literature Core
This course will examine Chaucer's major work, The Canterbury Tales, as well as his earlier love poems. We will be spending most of the semester on The Canterbury Tales so that we can explore the range of Chaucer's writings - his romances, bawdy stories, moral tales, and saints' lives. There will be two main goals: to pay close attention to Chaucer's poetry (and, therefore, to become familiar with Middle English) and to discuss the larger concerns to which Chaucer returned again and again - the position of women, social disruption, religious belief,the politics of the court, and the challenge of writing.
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 15393
 
Shakespeare – Text & Performance ENGL 3232-L01 Bly, M.
Interdisciplinary Capstone Core
This course will study Shakespeare’s plays first as texts and then as performance, focusing on the literary/historical aspect of a play, and then the same play as atheatrical script for realization in a performance setting. Through close readings from these widely disparate points of view, we will try to grasp how the theater acts to engage audiences and create meanings, and how time and culture are expressed in both text and performance. We’ll investigate questions about adaption, authorship, the status of “classic” texts and their variant forms, the transition from manuscript, book and stage to film and digitally inflected forms of media. Assignments will include readings, memorization, essays, and presentations. The final project can be an essay, the student’s short video excerpt, or a brief performance.
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 19296
 
Jonathan Swift ENGL 3305-C01 Boyle, F.
Advanced Literature Core
An intensive study of the works of Jonathan Swift.
  W 6:00-8:45

CRN 18632
 
Plays & Players, 1700 -­1800 ENGL 3329-L01 Sherman, S.
Pre 1800/ EP3
During the 1700s, the London world of entertainment changed in directions that now look, from our vantage, both long familiar and rather strange. The century ushered in the first feel-good comedies, calculated to make their audience cry and laugh by turn (though for a while it seems that playgoers preferred the weeping); the first exaltation of Shakespeare as more divinity than mere playwright (though his plays were nearly never performed as he wrote them); the first docudramas (theater goers could watch important news events reenacted at the playhouse for years afterwards); the first attempts to record performances for posterity (with pen and ink in place of mic and camera); the first theatrical superstars (weirdly approachable by our standards: virtually any fan might ask them out for coffee); and all the elaborate apparatus that sustained the stars’ centrality in the public eye: gossip columns, celebrity magazines, souvenirs, and tell-all memoirs. We’ll track all the change and strangeness by reading some of the centuries greatest theatrical hits alongside (and sometimes against) all the many modes of documentation in which they came swathed for their first audiences: diaries, letters, pamphlet wars, periodical essays, newspaper and magazine pieces, biographies and autobiographies, as well as the prologues and epilogues wherein writers contrived to track, almost night by night, the ever-shifting transactions between stage and world. Note: This is the second course in a two-course sequence spanning two centuries of British theater.The courses are continuous but independent: you may take either without taking the other.
  W 8:30-11:00

CRN 18541
 
Poems of Shakespeare & Others ENGL 3420-L01 Dubrow H.
Pre 1800/ Advanced Literature Core
The Poems of Shakespeare and His Contemporaries: Sex Religion, and Politics: Although Shakespeare is best known as a playwright he also composed many extraordinary poems, especially love sonnets. We will read them together with poetry by about five of his contemporaries. According to an old joke, sex, religion and politics are the three subjects one should not discuss at dinner parties – and these are precisely the subjects that recur most intriguingly and intensively in the poetry we’ll be exploring together. A sampling of the issues we’ll discuss: How does the poetry of the period reflect – or conceal – the political tensions that culminated in the English Revolution? Why do so many poets of this era write sonnets? How do these texts treat desire and gender?
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 19301
 
Spectacular Black Anatomies ENGL 3421-L01 Tyler, D.
Post 1800/Advanced Literature Core
From Charles W. Chesnutt’s exploration of black labor and bodily health in his short story collection The Conjure Woman (1899) to Suzan-Lori Parks’s account of the exploitative history of Saartjie Baartman’s buttocks and labia in her play Venus (1996), the black body and its parts—the skin, the face, the back, the limbs, and the buttocks—have been the subject of intense conversations in nineteenth and twentieth century literature and culture. This course explores not only the varied ways the black body has been constructed discursively but also how an understanding of black anatomy influences the way we think about race, ethnicity, gender, and disability. Among some of the other assigned texts will be the novels of Octavia Butler and James Weldon Johnson.
  MW 1:00-2:15

CRN 19035
 
19C British Women's Tales ENGL 3434-L01 Vranjes, V.
Post 1800/Advanced Literature core
This course will explore the development of the national tale, a feminist genre of the first two decades of the 19thC whose symbolic cross-regional marriages celebrate the British union. We will examine how women writers used the national tale's defining tropes for their own political, national, and feminist purposes throughout the century. Writers we will read include Sydney Owenson, Maria Edgeworth, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Elizabeth Gaskell, and George Eliot. Reading will include some literary criticism.
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 18544
 
American Modernism ENGL 3441-L01 Kramer, L.
Post 1800/Advanced Literature Core
A study of the responses by American poets and novelists to the radical social, cultural and technological changes of the first half of the twentieth century. Authors include William Carlos Williams, Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, Hart Crane, Willa Cather, William Faulkner, and Jean Toomer. Some attention will also go to film, music, and literary criticism.
  MW 1:00-2:15

CRN 19300
 
Modern Drama: Moral Crucible ENGL 3531-L01 Enelow, S.
Post 1800/Senior Values
After the French Revolution great European playwrights fashioned new plots, banished royalty from the cast of characters and made the theater an arena for moral and political conflict. Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov and Shaw bring us up to date on whistleblowers, women's rights, class struggle, weapons of mass destruction and total war.
  TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 15892
 
American Short Story ENGL 3617-L01 Tanksley, W.
Post 1800
We will explore the ways in which the short story form offers the reader a tight and often an ambiguous experience, asking a more intense participation by the reader and requiring a greater tolerance for ambiguity, uncertainty and exploration by the reader. This class also offers an opportunity to explore the short story form not only by critical analysis, but by the writing and discussing each others' stories.
  TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 19173
 
Contemporary Fiction ENGL 3841-L01 Tanksley, W.
Post 1800
What makes contemporary fiction "contemporary?" This course explores the fundamental transformation of the way contemporaries see the world by examining the work of writers from around the world.
  TF 2:30-3:45

CRN 18542
 
Hysteria/Sexuality/Unconscious ENGL 4137-L01 Hoffman A.
Interdisciplinary Capstone Core/EP3
This interdisciplinary seminar is sponsored by the Department of English and the Department of History. The seminar explores issues raised by hysteria, sexuality and the unconscious in turn of the twentieth-century western culture - topics that cross disciplinary boundaries From a historical perspective, they engaged medical, psychological, political, and ethnographic discourses and permeated artistic expression. From the perspective of contemporary inquiry, they are of interest to scholars engaged in studying gender, ethnicity, identity and difference, disease, and pathology.
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 15900
 
CROSS LISTED COURSES at Lincoln Center:
Theories of Comparative Literature  COLI 3000-L01 Hoffman, A.
Fulfills  English Theory  Requirement
A review of theories and methods of comparative literary studies, using literary theory and criticism as primary readings in conjunction with primary works of literature, drawing from a range of literary traditions.
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN18798
 
Caribbean Literature AFAM 3667-L01 Mustafa, F.
Applies to English Major and fulfills Globalism requirement
The broad survey of the literatures of the Caribbean, including translations from Spanish and French. Primarily 20th-century works will be read against the background of colonial discourse theory. Writers read include Maran, Cesaire, Fanon, Carpentier, Chauvet, Mhr, V.S. Naipaul, Walcott, Braithwaite, Kincaid, and others.
  T 2:30-5:15

CRN 18601
 
Writing and Creative Writing Courses at Lincoln Center:
Poetry & Performance ENGL 3005-L01 Perdomo, W.
How do you learn not only to write a good poem but also to deliver it effectively to an audience? The course focuses first of all, on writing poems for the page - but at the same time, as we produce written work, and as we workshop poems in progress, we will also explore reading and/or performing that work effectively, with a range of techniques and approaches to the written (and oral) word.   MW 11:30-12:45

CRN 19303
 
The Stuff of Fiction ENGL 3040-C01 Nair, M.
The proper stuff of fiction’ does not exist,” Virginia Woolf declared in an essay called “Modern Fiction”: “everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss.” In this workshop we will explore the process of transforming imaginative musings and life experience into fiction, looking particularly at how memory and place can serve as points of departure. We’ll examine how the details of everyday life can be transformed imaginatively into fiction through the use of character, setting, and dialogue. Along the way, we will stop to examine various aspects of craft such as theme, style, plot, and pacing in students’ own writings as well as in selected readings.   MR 8:30-9:45

CRN 19306
 
Writing Autobiography ENGL 3058-L01 Stone, E.
As Walt Whitman once said, in “Song of Myself,” “Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself, I am large, I contain multitudes.” And you do, too.  So in this writing workshop what you’ll be doing is writing about yourself. We’ll use work by other writers as models (from Sedaris to Baldwin with maybe a little Patti Smith thrown in) to inspire you to explore your own experiences: the people you love or hate (or both) the things that matter in your life, the forces, people or ideas that shaped you—from animals, food, love, holidays and tattoos to music, Venice, the Bronx, “Shrek,”or whatever. You’ll get plenty of feedback on your work from your classmates in a supportive environment. And you’ll learn how to use various literary techniques (dialogue? flashback? description?) to make your writing as vivid and moving and engaging as you can. So sign up.  And bring your multitudes with you!   TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 10117
 
Performing & Telling Your Life ENGL 3065-L01 Eng, A.
This is a course on writing and performing autobiographical stories. To prepare, we'll screen performances by autobiographical monologists such as Spalding Gray, and humorists such as David Sedaris, examining the difference between writing for the stage and writing for the page. We'll discuss the mechanics of first-person storytelling, and write and perform short weekly assignments, all building to the final class: a public performance of a five-minute autobiographical story.   M 6:00-8:45

CRN 18640
 
Translating Poetry ENGL 3073-L01 Brandt, C.
What does it mean to translate a poem well? How to be true to the original and carry over the aesthetic excitement as well as its meaning? Requirement: a good working knowledge of a language other than English.   TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 19302
 
Travel Writing ENGL 4013-L01 Santora, B.
“I have found out that there ain't no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them." --Mark Twain. In this course we will explore travel writing in its many forms, ranging from print magazines to web sites, newspapers, books, blogs, multi-media, and even Twitter feeds. We will read the masters (Mark Twain, Bill Bryson, Paul Theroux) as well as contemporary notables (Gully Wells, Pico Iyer). We will discuss the various elements that go into crafting a travel article, including research methods, interview techniques, sourcing, and editing. We'll also discuss pitching techniques, the ethics of press trips/events, and the importance of social media networking. By sharing pieces in a workshop format, we will hone the structure, coherence, style, and voice of each writer. Guest speakers will reveal how they made their way in the field. We will also touch on the difficulties the web has posed for the travel writing genre and the constantly evolving career opportunities for travel writers. In the end, we'll figure out if Mark Twain is right.   MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 19304
 
Graduate Courses at Lincoln Center:
Master Class: Young Adult/Children's Lit ENGL 5175-L01 Wyeth, S.

A Master Class level creative writing workshop where students will engage in writing for younger readers, children through YA, with attention to process and the art of storytelling. Beginning with the birth of a story idea, the class will explore the areas of plot, character, setting, voice and theme. During the semester students will develop a writing portfolio consisting of prewriting, first draft, revised and polished pages.

  W 6:00-8:30

CRN 16054
 
Graduate Courses Open to Undergraduates
*5000 level courses listed under Graduate / Courses are open to Seniors with the instructor's and graduate director's permission and after graduate students have registered. Email requests to instructors must include Student's Name and FIN, Dean's email, Home School. Please email instructor's approval to marstern@fordham.edu. Requests will be confirmed at least one week before courses start.
 
 

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