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Fall 2013 Undergraduate Courses









 
 Undergraduate Courses - Fall 2013
 
  Fordham College at Rose Hill
 
  Required
  Pre-1800 courses
  Post-1800 courses
  Creative Writing Courses
  CROSS LISTED WRITing courses
 
  Fordham College at Lincoln Center
 
  Required
  pre-1800 courses
  POST-1800 courses
  CROSS LISTED courses 
  Creative Writing Courses
 
  GRADUATE COURSES OPEN TO UNDERGRADUATES
   
  Undergraduate English Courses F13 Book Lists will be posted here.

 
Fordham College at Rose Hill
Junior Theory Requirement at Rose Hill:
Theories of Comparative Literature ENGL 3000-R01 GoGwilt, C.

A review of theories and methods of comparative literary studies, using literary theory and criticism as primary readings in conjunction with primary works of literature, drawing from a range of literary traditions.

  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 22043
 
 
Pre-1800 Courses at Rose Hill:
Chaucer ENGL 3107-R01 Yeager, S.
Reading and analysis of The Canterbury Tales and other major poems. This course will examine Chaucer's major work, The Canterbury Tales, as well as his earlier love poems. We will be spending most of the semester on The Canterbury Tales so that we can explore the range of Chaucer's writings-­]his romances, bawdy stories, moral tales, and saints' lives. There will be two main goals: to pay close attention to Chaucer's poetry (and, therefore, to become familiar with Middle English) and to discuss the larger concerns to which Chaucer returned again and again-­]the position of women, social disruption, religious belief, the politics of the court, and the challenge of writing.
Advanced Literature Core, EP3, Comp Lit, Medieval Studies
  TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 18039
 
Medieval Tolerance/Intolerance ENGL 3131-R01 Wogan-Browne, J.
Studies Medieval literary texts for their representations of various peoples, ethnicities, beliefs, relationships, models of justice, etc. Taught in the original (for some late medieval English texts) and in translation.
Advanced Literature Core, Medieval Studies
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 15771
 
Shakespeare ENGL 3206-R01 McEleney, C.
Poetry and plays studied in relation to Renaissance and 20th-­century concerns and ideologies. Emphasis on Shakespeare and his works read and constructed in regard to power, class, gender, and literary aesthetics.
Advanced Literature Core
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 15762
     
Early Women Novelists
ENGL 3318-R01 Greenfield, S.
A study of the rise of female authors in the early modern period. We will address problems of gender and rigorously analyze the basic literary and historical dimensions of each text. Authors will include Behn, Burney, Wollstonecraft, Radcliffe, Austen, Emily and Charlotte Bronte.   TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 20993
     
Plays and Players, 1600-1700
ENGL 3319-R01 McEleney, C.
Beginning in the 1660's, the stage mirrored the world in ways unprecedented: new performers (actresses trod the boards for the first time ever); new protagonists (middle-­class as well as aristocratic); new shapes of comedy and lighting; new styles of acting; and new audiences keen to absorb, assess, and gossip about whatever transpired on stage, in the stalls, and behind the scenes. We'll investigate all this innovation, through play texts, performances (live and recorded), and all the modes of writing (diaries, letters, autobiographies, reviews)by which spectators sought to preserve the evanescent but often spellbinding experience of going to a play.
EP3
  MR 10:00-11:15

CRN 20992
 
Captives/Cannibals/Rebels ENGL 3333-R01 Holm, M.
Captives, cannibals and rebels are everywhere in the early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think about why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and what they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the 17th and 18th centuries; authors may include Mary Rowaldson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, UncaElize Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle.
Advanced Literature Core, EP3
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 20994
 
Captives/Cannibals/Rebels ENGL 3333-R02 Holm, M.
Captives, cannibals and rebels are everywhere in the early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think about why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and what they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the 17th and 18th centuries; authors may include Mary Rowaldson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Elize Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle.
Advanced Literature Core, EP3
  TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 20995
 
Fops & Coquettes in 18th Century Lit
ENGL 3233-R01 Holm, M.
This class will look at two highly charged figures of eighteenth-­century culture, the fop and coquette, who emerge quite well dressed from the decadence of the period. We will inquire into why these types appear at this historical moment; the histories of those labeled (or libeled) as fops and flirts; and the anxieties about gender roles and sexual identities that surround them.    TF 2:30-3:45

CRN 20998
 
Medieval Traveler
MVST 4005-R01 Yeager, S.
This course follows the routes of pilgrims, crusaders, merchants, nobles and peasants as they charted a course for lands of promise and hoped for prosperity. In Medieval Traveler, we will read selections from the diaries, chronicles, and historical literature written by and about travelers in the Middle Ages. We will begin with Egeria’s fourth-century sojourn in the Holy Land, and conclude with navigators such as Columbus, as they sought miracles, marvels, and new trading routes on the cusp of the known world. We will focus in particular on the practicalities of medieval travel, and well as the reasons for traveling: the sacred, the profane, and everything in between.
EP3/Interdisciplinary Capstone/cross-listed with Medieval Studies Program
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 20958
       
Hobbits/Heroes/Hubris ENGL 4096-R01 Kavros, H.
Culminating with Tolkien’s The Hobbit, this course will examine the male hero, with all his cultural, philosophical, and individual limitations. We will take a close look at the epic journeys of Gilgamesh, Jeremiah, Ahab, Beowulf, and the Hobbit. Pride and Prejudice will provide a domestic counterpoint and alternative view of male heroism. The course emphasizes writing and oral presentation.
Senior Values, EP4
  MR 8:30-9:45

CRN 18032
       
Post-1800 Courses at Rose Hill:
Contemporary Women Poets ENGL 3067-R01 O'Donnell, A.
In this course, students will read poetry written by women poets in the 20th and 21st centuries with a focus on the imaginative representation of women's lived experience. We will read the work of poets who address the themes of feminine embodiment and sexuality, women's roles as mothers and daughters, women's work (both professional and domestic), and the role poetry plays in enabling women to discover a language to contain their experience. Among the (possible) poets we will read are Sylvia Plath, Ann Sexton, Elizabeth Bishop, Lucille Cifton, Anna Swir, Adrienne Rich, Marie Ponsot, Eavan Boland, Louise Erdrich, Kate Daniels, Mary Karr and A.E. Stallings.
Advanced Literature Core, EP3
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 20996
 
     
       
 
     
       
 
     
       
 
     
       
 
Modernist Poetry
ENGL 3535-R01 Sanchez, R.
Modernist Poetry offers an intensive survey of major thematic currents and formal experiments in British, Irish and American verse from the late 19th century through World War II. Beginning with Gerard Manley Hopkins and Thomas Hardy, the course will devote central attention to the poetic development of W.B. Yeats, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens, while also exploring works by such major figures as Ezra Pound, H.D., Robert Frost, Wilfred Owen, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, W.H. Auden and Langston Hughes.
Advanced Literature Core
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 21002
 
Major American Authors
ENGL 3653-R01 Cornell Goldwitz, Elizabeth
This course provides an introduction to major American authors.
Advanced Literature Core
  TR
5:30-6:45

CRN 15761
 
Postwar U.S. Literature & Culture
ENGL 3662-R01 Contreras, D.
This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-­cultural movements of the post-­WWII war era as represented in American literature and history. Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-­war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.
Advanced Literature Core, EP3, Interdisciplinary Capstone
  TF



TF
10:00-11:15

CRN 18050

11:30-12:45

CRN 18052
 
American Writers in Paris ENGL 3701-R01 Collins, C.
As a capital of modern Western culture, Paris has long been attractive to experimental artists from other countries, a home in exile to find supportive audiences, publishers, and collaborators. For American writers in the 20th century, this activity took place in roughly two movements: after WWI , the "Lost Generation" of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Stein and others, and after WWII a circle of African American authors including Wright, Baldwin, and Himes. Through a selection of their works, as well as the art and music of the period, this course will explore the creative aims and cultural contexts of these two innovative groups.
Advanced Literature Core
  MR 5:30-6:45

CRN 21004
 
     
       
 
The Poet's Choice ENGL 4018-R01 Hassett, C.
The “Poet’s Choice” explores the history and practice of English language poetry. The aim is to provide the historical grounding that enables you to talk knowledgeably and write convincingly about artists’ sense of their options – from the earliest canonical authors to the 21st-­century American Laureates – as they make aesthetic choices. The syllabus includes English and American poetry, literary criticism, and recent reviews in print and online. This EP course emphasizes close reading, luminous critical writing, and good talking.
EP3, Advanced Literature Core
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 19266
 
Joyce's Ulysses ENGL 4032-R01 Kerins, F.
This seminar undertakes an intensive, chapter by chapter reading of Joyce's serio-­]comic epic, Ulysses, in the context of literary modernism and in relation to several theoretical frameworks: psychoanalytic, reader-­response, gender studies, deconstructive, and post]colonial.
Advanced Literature Core
  TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 20999
 
Sem. Kieslowski's Decalogue
 ENGL 4124-R01 Sicker, P.
The seminar is an intensive study of Krzysztof Kieslowski's extraordinary cinematic meditations on the ten commandments. The course will explore the visual texture and complex ethical perspectives of the ten Decalogue films made in Communist Poland in the late 1980, along with two related works. There will be ancillary readings in philosophy, literature and film theory.
Advanced Literature Core
   R 2:30-4:59

CRN 20997
 
4 Modern Catholic Writers
 ENGL 4129-R01 Giannone, R.
This seminar will consider the writings of Dorothy Day (1897-­1980), Thomas Merton (1915-­1968), Flannery O'Connor (1925-­1964), and Walker Percy (1916-­1990). These four authors, who arguably can be termed reformers as well as artists in their own right, are the principal critics of the modern Catholic predicament before and after World War II. Each in her or his way saw a church in drastic need of rebuilding and sought to restore what had collapsed and had been left unheeded by what was essentially an immigrant institution.
EP4, Senior Values
   T 2:30-5:00

CRN 11206
 
Creative Writing Courses at Rose Hill:
Poetry Writing: Poetry What Good Is It?
ENGL 3015-R08 Brandt, C.
What good is poetry in a world in perpetual crisis? Why bother? Can poetry actually do anything? This course will look at poetry of political or religious (or simply human) resistance, written by poets from a variety of cultures and historical periods who have been marginalized, surveilled, exiled, jailed, tortured, disappeared, sent to gulags or assassinated. These poets along with their histories will be used as jumping-­]off places for students' own writing, preferably of poetry, but prose is fine too – that's up to the individual student. Each student will be expected to write at least two poems each week. As many as possible will be workshopped in class, the others in individual appointments with the instructor.    MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 21008
 
Digital Creative Writing:
Literary Magazine Workshop I
ENGL 3017-R03 Gambito, S.
The aim of this class is to give students the experience and skills necessary to create a literary magazine in alignment with the most recent and rapid changes in literary consumption. Students will curate, edit and write for CURA, the print and online literary magazine of the Creative Writing program. Instruction will also focus on the marketing, publicity and event production protocols and practices crucial for successful literary publishing. Working collaboratively, students will endeavor to expand the boundaries of the literary magazine by examining the best powers of print and online venues in order to achieve the maximum impact of both.    TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 21006
 
Digital Creative Writing:  Digital Workshop and Tools for Creative Writers
 ENGL 3017-R07  Legault, P.
Directed as a workshop, this course will focus on students' writing from the perspective of a producer. We will pay special attention to a variety of media - digital, social, print - and the ways they translate to an individual's writing practice. Guest lectures, off-site/online events, and weekly reading will be determined by the instructor and student interests.    MR 5:30-6:45

CRN 22037
 
Creative Writing Workshop:  First Flint Creative Process
 ENGL 3019-R01  Gambito, S.
In this course we will engage in the process of writing and determining what makes for studious creative process. As we embark on a series of exercises involving journals, objects, language, dream, memory, body, and the world, we will explore the means by which language is generated and shaped. Although you will never be required to write in any particular genre, you will be exposed to poetry, fiction, and drama and you will begin to see how these distinctions are often less helpful than they seem.    TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 22039
 
Digital Creative Writing:
Writing the Bizarre
ENGL 3019-R07 Kupperman, K.
The proper stuff of fiction’ does not exist,” Virginia Woolf declared in an essay called “Modern Fiction”: “everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss.” In this workshop we will explore the process of transforming imaginative musings and life experience into fiction, looking particularly at how memory and place can serve as points of departure. We’ll examine how the details of everyday life can be transformed imaginatively into fiction through the use of character, setting, and dialogue. Along the way, we will stop to examine various aspects of craft such as theme, style, plot, and pacing in students’ own writings as well as in selected readings.   MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 21007
 
Poetry Writing: The Poet's Craft ENGL 3028-E07 Ehrenberg, E.
An introduction to the craft of writing poetry. Student manuscripts are the subject of assignments and class discussion.
FPCS
  M 6:30-9:15

CRN 21083
 
Fordham College at Lincoln Center
REQUIRED Courses at Lincoln Center:
Theory for English Majors ENGL 3045-L02 Kramer, L.
This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices and language itself. We will engage with a range of critical and social issues shaping the field of literary studies today, while considering, more generally, the relationship
between theory and literature.
Fulfills English theory requirement
  MW 11:30-12:45

CRN 20804
 
Pre-1800 Courses at Lincoln Center:
Shakespeare ENGL 3206-L01 Bly, M.
Poetry and plays studied in relation to Renaissance and 20th­]century concerns and ideologies. Emphasis on Shakespeare and his works read and constructed in regard to power, class, gender, and literary aesthetics.
Advanced Literature Core
  TF 2:30-3:45

CRN 20803
 
Poems of Shakespeare and Others
ENGL 3420-L01 Dubrow, H.
Although Shakespeare is best known as a playwright, he also composed many extraordinary poems, especially love sonnets. We will read them together with poetry by about five of his contemporaries. According to an old joke, sex, religion, and politics are the three subjects one should not discuss at dinner parties-­]-­] and these are precisely the subjects that recur most intriguingly and intensively in the poetry we'll be exploring together. A sampling of the issues we'll discuss: how does the poetry ofthe period reflect ]-­] or conceal ]-­] the political tensions that culminated in the English Revolution? why do so many poets of this era write sonnets? how do these texts treat desire and gender?
Advanced Literature Core
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 19301
 
Early American Literature:
Literature and Politics in the Early U.S.
ENGL 3599-L01 Stein, J.
This course surveys both popular and elite documents of the late eighteenth century, in order to consider the continuities between fictional and moreproperly political textsduring this period. These continuities allow us to contemplate the relationship between fiction and political theory, both of which are imaginative genres, despite being generally understood as having distinct formal properties and appealing to different readerships. Looking at both fiction and political theory, we will contemplate the meaning of liberty, the best forms of government, natural and unnatural affiliations, political and social identities (national, colonial, creole, and indigenous), as well as other matters for debate in the period, including custom, slavery, landscape, gender, and genre. Authors include Charles Brockden Brown, William Wells Brown, Hannah Webster Foster, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Paine, Susanna Rowson, and Phillis Wheatley.   TF 2:30-3:45

CRN 22423
 
Post-1800 Courses at Lincoln Center:
Victorian Literature
ENGL 3402-L01 Vranjes, V.
The period we will survey in this course is named after Queen Victoria, who ascended the British throne in 1837. Yet, scholars traditionally date the period from somewhere between 1829 and 1832, the years marked by agitation for reforms and the bills it produced (most famously, the first Reform Bill). Victorians did, indeed, continue the reformist trend that ushered in their era, attempting to improve everything: their own moral selves; their fallen women and their conquered peoples; their laws; their education; their police; their sanitary conditions; their religious views. As we read the texts assigned for this course (novels by Collins, Dickens, and Gaskell; a play by Wilde; a selection of essays and poems), we will explore broadly the notion of “reform” in order to understand how its various meanings helped Victorians imagine the world and interpret the times in which they lived.
Advanced Literature Core
  MR 8:30-9:45

CRN 20801
 
Romanticism & Private Life
ENGL 3462-C01 Zimmerman, S.
In an expanding celebrity age, Romantic writers developed a new appreciation for solitude, family, and friendship. Our texts explore the pleasures, benefits, and risks of private life in a growing media culture. Writers include Lord Byron, Mary Robinson, Felicia Hemans, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, John Clare.   R 6:00-8:45

CRN 20970
 
Modern Drama-Moral Crucible
ENGL 3531-C01 Appels, J.
This course will take a close look at the phenomenon of "genre" fiction - novels labeled young adult, science fiction, romance, or mystery. The aim of the course is to develop a clear understanding of genre fiction's history, as well as its role in the publishing industry. Speakers will include publishers, agents, and editors. Final projects may range from a formal analysis of a novel or group of novels, an investigation of a segment of the publishing industry, or four to five chapters of a genre novel. Weekly readings of novels ranging throughout the genres is required.
Advanced Literature Core, Creative Writing, EP4, SRVL
  W 6:00-8:45

CRN 21678
 
Acting American
ENGL 3612-C01 Enelow, S.
What does it mean to act American? This course proposes that theatrical acting is a privileged site for the formulation and expression of cultural values. We will examine the construction of American identity from the revolution to the present in and through performance in several different ways: by studying the history of American drama and theater, by analyzing representations of actors and acting in American novels and films, and by reading and thinking about acting techniques and performance styles throughout American history. Issues of racial and sexual difference in the construction of the national identity will take center stage in our discussions.
Advanced Literature Core
  T 6:00-8:45

CRN 21113
 
Ordinariness ENGL 3620-L01 Stein, J.
The “ordinary” what is usual, customary, habitual, indistinct. In life, the ordinary blends into the background, unseen or unnoticed until something brings it crisis. In fiction, however, where there is no background other than what description conjures, the ordinary is a carefully manufactured aspect of narration. The purpose of this course is to pay attention to some of the ways that realism, as a particular narrative subgenre, conjures ordinariness. We’ll consider the ways that realist fictions construct ordinary details (commodities, objects, settings, weather), ordinary actions (laboring, walking, falling in love), ordinary time (work days, boring dinners, long afternoons), and ordinary feelings (frustration, ennui, affection, resentment). Novelists may include Henry James, Theodore Dreiser, Virginia Woolf, and Alison Bechdel; and we’ll also read some theoretical work by D.W. Winnicott, Roland Barthes, Fredric Jameson, Lauren Berlant, and Kathleen Stewart.
  TF 8:30-9:45

CRN 21112
 
American Naturalism
ENGL 3628-C01 Cassuto, L.
Influenced by Darwinian science, freebooting postbellum capitalism, and rapid industrialization, American literature took a sharp deterministic turn in the 1890s. We will trace that turn, and the path it led forward, in fiction and poetry by Dreiser, Wharton, Frost, and others.
Advanced Literature Core, FCPS
  M 6:00-8:45

CRN 21994
 
Postmodern Fiction &
Environmetal Justice
ENGL 3632-L01 Lioi, A.
Postmodern fiction in the United States has been characterized as a challenge to modernism and an expression of a new epoch, postmodernity, that disrupts the modern project of the master of nature. In this course, we will explore postmodern fiction from the perspective of environmental justice, a movement that combines traditional environmentalism with social justice activism. How does this activist perspective transform the aesthetic, epistemic, and existential concerns of postmodernism? How does the art of fiction illuminate the struggle for justice? Our investigation of these questions will engage the work of Thomas Pynchon, Toni Morrison, Don DeLillo, Leslie Marmon Silko, Ana Castillo, Tony Kushner, and Junot Diaz, among others.
Advanced Literature Core
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 22566
 
Extraordinary Bodies ENGL 3843-L01 Cassuto, L.
From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives.
Senior Values, EP4, Cross-listed with COLI & AMST
  W 8:30-11:15

CRN21668
 
Hysteria/Sexuality/Unconscious ENGL 4137-L01 Hoffman, A.
This interdisciplinary seminar is sponsered by the Department of English and the Department of History. The seminar explores issues raised by hysteria, sexuality, and the unconscious in turn of the twentieth-century western culture- topics that cross disciplinary boundaries. From a historical perspective, they engaged medical, psychological, political, and enthnographic discourses and permeated artistic expression. From the perspective of contemporary inquiry, they are of interest to scholars engaged in studying gender, ethnicity, identity and difference, disease and pathology.
EP3, Interdisciplinary Capstone
  W 2:30-3:45

CRN 15900
 
CROSS LISTED Courses at Lincoln Center:
Queer Theory and The Americas
MVST 4005-L01 Enelow, S. &
Fischer, C.
What does it mean to (be) queer? Whether we see “queerness” as an identity or as a practice, does it change depending on our context? This course will analyze and explore the ramifications of one of the key theoretical movements in the humanities in the last twenty years: the interdisciplinary work on gender, sexuality, politics, and culture collectively known as “queer theory.” We will attempt to reconstruct an intellectual and literary history of queer theory as it has been translated back and forth and (re)appropriated across national, class, racial, and ethnic borders in the Americas. Is it possible to trace a genealogy of queer theory that is able to adapt to multiple cultural contexts without perpetuating historical power imbalances between “north” and “south”? Drawing from the often divergent traditions of Anglo and Hispanic America, this course will take an interdisciplinary approach to queer methodologies for cultural and literary studies. Students will encounter foundational queer theoretical texts (both historical and contemporary) as well as novels, plays, and films, and will explore, for themselves, what queerness means and does.
EP3, Interdisciplinary Capstone
  MR 10:00-11:15

CRN 20988
 
Literature, Film & Development
COLI 4020-L01 Mustafa, F.
We will study Development and its discourse as it has emerged since the eighteenth century within humanist frameworks of philosophy/science, (the animal-­human divide) literature (stories/narrative as colonial inscription), and technology (as techne and prostheses manifest in photography, film and video), to explore the ways it inflects our perceptions and ways we read our own and other worlds. In particular, we will focus on how Development/development has constructed and shaped the many significations of “the human” from the early modern to contemporary times.
Fulfills the Globalism requirement, EP3, Interdisciplinary Capstone
  T 2:30-5:15

CRN 20868
 
Creative Writing Courses at Lincoln Center:
Fiction Writing: Stuff of Fiction
ENGL 3013-L01 Nair, M.
The proper stuff of fiction’ does not exist,” Virginia Woolf declared in an essay called “Modern Fiction”: “everything is the proper stuff of fiction, every feeling, every thought; every quality of brain and spirit is drawn upon; no perception comes amiss.” In this workshop we will explore the process of transforming imaginative musings and life experience into fiction, looking particularly at how memory and place can serve as points of departure. We’ll examine how the details of everyday life can be transformed imaginatively into fiction through the use of character, setting, and dialogue. Along the way, we will stop to examine various aspects of craft such as theme, style, plot, and pacing in students’ own writings as well as in selected readings.   MR 10:00-11:55

CRN 22512
 
Fiction Writing: Writers as Shapers: Sculpting the Story
ENGL 3013-L09 Nair, M.
A piece of fiction can be constructed in an unlimited number of ways and each week we will explore the formal possibilities that are available to us. We will study the choices we can make as writers—of narrative point of view, beginnings, resolutions, dialogue, description, pacing, plot and character development. We will isolate and inspect strategies that published authors have used. Students will produce and workshop their own fiction from exercises. In the conversation between student writing and the studied literature there will hopefully be a greater sense of writers as shapers, sculptors of the raw material of story.   MR 8:00-9:45

CRN 21982
 
Creative Non-Fiction Writing:
Performing and Telling Your Life
ENGL 3014-C01 Braly, J.
This is a course on writing and performing autobiographical stories. To prepare, we’ll screen performances by autobiographical monologists such as Spalding Gray, and humorists such as David Sedaris, examining the difference between writing for the stage and writing for the page. We’ll discuss the mechanics of first-­]person storytelling, and write and perform short weekly assignments. All building to the final class: a public performance of a five]minute autobiographical story.   M 6:00-8:45

CRN 21781
 
The Poet's Craft
ENGL 3058-L07 Novey, Idra
An introduction to the craft of writing poetry. Student manuscripts are the subject of assignments and class discussions.   MW 10:00-11:15

CRN 21656
 
Experimental Writing for Non-Experimental Writers
ENGL 3019-C01 Khakpour, P.
What does it mean for writing to be experimental? The great writer Margaret Atwood defines it as writing "that sets up certain rules for itself . . . while subverting the conventions according to which readers have understood what constitutes a proper work of literature." In making its own rules, a lot of the old rules have to be tossed out, of course, and so this workshop provides a few examples of the most innovative, rule-­]busting, eclectic works of the postmodern, absurdist, metafictional and transgressive canon. We’ll look at a wild and gutsy array of passages, old and new, that dare to be different. We'll also generate multi-­]genre experimental writing of our own through a series of exercises.   MR 4:00-5:15

CRN
 
Writing Autobiography
ENGL 3014-L01 Stone, E.
"The detail is divine," writes memoirist Patricia Hampl. "if you caress it into life, you find the world you have lost or ignored, the world ruined or devalued, the world you alone can bring into being." Ok, so maybe we can't build a world in a semester, but in this creative writing workshop, we can make a start. Maybe we'll write about food or animals or that utterly meaningless memory (was it?) from when you were four, or a song that brings to mind the unforgettable summer of 2009, or about someone you know who's slightly larger than life. Throughout the course we'll be focusing on writing techniques (like dialogue or description or metaphor) that can bring words to life, on good beginnings and good endings, and the verbs that best fit (or don't) what you're trying to say. We'll use model essays, and we'll read and analyze a few essays-­]-­]by Baldwin or Didion or David Foster Wallace-­]-­]that continue to dazzle. And in the end, you'll know more than you knew, and probably write better than you wrote.
Cross-listed AMST, COMM
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 10117
 
FORDHAM COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL and CONTINUING STUDIES 
English Electives and Writing Courses are listed within the “Lincoln Center” sections.
 
Graduate Courses Open to Undergraduates
*5000 level courses listed under Graduate / Courses are open to Seniors with the instructor's and graduate director's permission and after graduate students have registered. Email requests to instructors must include Student's Name and FIN, Dean's email, Home School. Please email instructor's approval to marstern@fordham.edu. Requests will be confirmed at least one week before courses start.