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Spring 2013 Undergraduate Courses









 
 Undergraduate Courses - Spring 2013
 
  Fordham College at Rose Hill
 
  Required
  Pre-1800 courses
  Post-1800 courses
  SENIOR VALUES
  Creative Writing & WRITING Courses
  CROSS LISTED WRITing courses
 
  Fordham College at Lincoln Center
 
  Required
  pre-1800 courses
  POST-1800 courses
  Senior values
  CROSS LISTED courses 
  Creative Writing & WRITING CourseS
 
  GrAdUATE COURSES OPEN TO UNDERGRADUATES
   
  Forthcoming: Undergraduate English Courses S13 Book Lists
   
 
Fordham College at Rose Hill
Junior Theory Requirement at Rose Hill:
THEORY FOR ENGLISH MAJORS
ENGL 3045-R01 Gold, M.
This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices, and language itself.
Fulfills the ENGL theory requirement.
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 19822
 
Pre-1800 Courses at Rose Hill:
DEATH IN THE MIDDLE AGES ENGL 3129-R01 Erler, M.
This course will examine death culture, including rituals of death, the instructions for a good death, visual depictions of death, and the great theme of the afterlife.
Senior Values
  TF 8:30-9:45

CRN 19825
 
MILTON ENGL 3207-R01 Keller E.
A survey of the major poetry and prose of John Milton with strong emphasis on Paradise Lost.
Pre-1800, ALC
  W 11:30-1:59

CRN 19841
 
SHAKESPEARE & POPULAR CULTURE ENGL 3222-R01 Bly, M.
This course focuses on theories of popular culture in tandem with items of popular culture related in some way to Shakespeare's work. We will be reading cultural theory every week. Please keep this double focus in mind: we want to figure out why and how Shakespeare's work is employed, not merely in what manifold ways he appears.   W 11:30-1:59

CRN 19826
 
CAPTIVES/CANNIBALS/REBELS ENGL 3333-R01 Kim, J.C.
Captives, cannibals and rebels are everywhere in the early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think about why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and what they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the 17th and 18th centuries; authors may include Mary Rowaldson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, UncaElize Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle.
ALC, EP3
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 15098
 
CAPTIVES/CANNIBALS/REBELS ENGL 3333-R02 Kim, J.C.
Captives, cannibals and rebels are everywhere in the early English writing about the Americas and the British Empire. In this course, we will think about why these figures fascinated authors and readers so much and what they can tell us about anxieties regarding colonization. We will read travel and captivity narratives, novels, plays, and poetry from the 17th and 18th centuries; authors may include Mary Rowaldson, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Unca Elize Winkfield, George Colman, John Stedman, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Earle.
ALC, EP3
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 15100
 
EARLY MODERN LIT 1579-1625 ENGL 3334-R01 Ziegler, J.
THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED.   TF 1:00-2:15
 
DEVILS, FOOLS, MADMEN ENGL 3261-R01 Kerins, F.
In this course we will study the nature of madness, the concept of folly and the reality of devils in Elizabethan Drama.  We will discuss major plays of Marlowe, Beaumont, Shakespeare, and Jonson to show how these bizarre deviants came to dominate the Shakespearean era and why society had such a fascination with them.
Pre-1800, ALC
  TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 20161
 
ROMANTICISM & REVOLUTION ENGL 3460-R01
ENGL 3460-R02
Bugg, J.
This course will examine the literature of the Romantic period (1789-1832) in light of the explosive social and political upheavals of the time. The central figures of British Romanticism wrote amidst and about this exciting and turbulent climate. William Blake, Mary Wollstonecraft, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, William Wordsworth: these authors witnessed and often participated in the raucous political movements of the day, from regicide to social reintegration. We will study their works, ranging from Blake's Songs of Innocence and of Experience to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, paying attention to a variety of lesser-known authors (such as Mary Hays, John Thelwall, Charlotte Smith, and Olaudah Equiano) who helped shape the literature of the revolutionary period. Students will also be introduced to some of the era's lively political pamphlets, visual culture, propaganda, and street ballads. Two intertwined questions will guide our work across the semester: What does it mean to imagine entirely new social orders? What does it mean to imagine entirely new modes of writing?
Pre-1800, ALC, Interdisciplinary Capstone
  TF


TF
11:30-12:45
CRN 19831

2:30-3:45
CRN 19832
 
HISTORY OF ENG LANG ENGL 3834-R01 Chase S.J., M.
The subject of this course will be the history of English from the Old English period to the present day, and the range of varieties that are found throughout the world. We will study the visual forms English has taken from early runic engravings through medieval manuscripts to recent texts; the radical changes that have taken place in the structure of English over the centuries; the position of English as an "international" language; variation in English grammar and pronunciation; how individual speakers vary their use of thelanguage; and how far it is possible to speak of "good" and "bad" English.
Pre-1800
  TF 2:30-3:45

CRN 19823
       
SHAKESPEARE'S CONTEMPORARIES ENGL 4205-R01 McEleney, C.
In this survey of early modern English drama exclusive of Shakespeare, we will read a range of plays within their generic and social contexts.  We will study dramas that both define, and defy, common conceptions about tragedy and comedy and the differences between these genres.
Pre-1800
  MR 10:00-11:15

CRN 19827
       
BIBLE IN ENGLISH POETRY ENGL 4135-R01 Caldwell, M.
This course studies some of the books of the Bible which have been most influential on English literature, together with English poetry and critical texts, from the Middle Ages to the present, which have been influenced by these biblical books. We will study the various English versions of the Bible and their backgrounds, but the focus will be on the Authorized Version (“King James Bible”) of 1611. The course will proceed sequentially through the Bible from Genesis through Revelation. At each class meeting we will discuss a key biblical text alongside a variety of poems, from all periods, inspired by or related to it.
Pre-1800, Senior Values, EP4
  R 2:30-4:59

CRN 19824
       
MEDIEVAL TRAVELER MVST 4005-R01
MVST 4005-R02
Yeager, S.
This course follows the routes of pilgrims, crusaders, merchants, nobles and peasants as they charted a course for lands of promise and hoped-for prosperity. In Medieval Traveler, we will read selections from the diaries, chronicles, and historical literature written by and about travelers in the Middle Ages. We will begin with Egeria’s fourth-century sojourn in the Holy Land, and conclude with navigators such as Columbus, as they sought miracles, marvels, and new trading routes on the cusp of the known world. We will focus in particular on the practicalities of medieval travel, and well as the reasons for traveling: the sacred, the profane, and everything in between.
Pre-1800, EP3/ Interdisciplinary Capstone/Cross-listed with Medieval Studies.
  TF


TF
10:00-11:15
CRN 17812

1:00-2:15
CRN 19761
 
Post-1800 Courses at Rose Hill:
CONTEMPORARY WOMEN POETS ENGL 3067-R01 O'Donnell, A.
In this course, students will read poetry written by women poets in the 20th and 21st centuries with a focus on the imaginative representation of women's lived experience. We will read the work of poets who address the themes of feminine embodiment and sexuality, women's roles as mothers and daughters, women's work (both professional and domestic), and the role poetry plays in enabling women to discover a language to contain their experience. Among the (possible) poets we will read are Sylvia Plath, Ann Sexton, Elizabeth Bishop, Lucille Cifton, Anna Swir, Adrienne Rich, Marie Ponsot, Eavan Boland, Louise Erdrich, Kate Daniels, Mary Karr and A.E. Stallings.
Post-1800, EP3
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 17403
 
WORLD CINEMA MASTERPIECES ENGL 3137-R01 Sicker, P.
World Cinema Masterpieces provides a close analysis of style, narrative structure and visual texture in selected masterworks of major European, Asian and American filmmakers between 1930 and 1960. Directors under consideration include: Renoir, Carne, Lang, Welles, Ophuls, Hitchcock, Bresson, Kurosawa, Ray, Bergman, Rossellini, Fellini, Truffaut, Powell, Mizoguchi, and Godard.
Post-1800, Cross-listed with Comparative Literature
  TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 19992
 
EARLY AMERICAN NOVELS
ENGL 3336-R01 Grisafi, P.
The American novel was a late arrival.  No novels were published in American during the colonial period, and the first native entries in the genre appeared in the late eighteenth century, shortly after the formation of the United States and generations after the first English novels were published. This course will sketch the tradition of the American novel from its beginnings through the Civil War. To that end, we read a selection of representative early American novels-representative, that is, of the way that we view the history of the American novel today. We will consider the way that the American novel comes into being: what literary categories it draws upon, and how. We will also trace the ways that American novels came to be valued (some more than others), in their own time and ours. And we will consider different ways of reading early American novels, employing approaches old and new.
Post-1800, EP3
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 19993
 
MODERN GEOGRAPHIES ENGL 3340-R01 Sanchez, R.
This course will explore the ways shifting conceptions of space impacted modernist writing. Developments in technologies of communication and transportation enabled both people and ideas to move across space in new ways, challenging national identities and the relationship between self and other. Much of the innovation we associated with literary modernism emerges in response to this increasingly globalized landscape. Our analysis of modernism's globalized spaces will include: discussions of urbanism, public space, colonialism and post-colonialism, expatriate and travel writing, and representations of inner states of being.
Post-1800, ALC
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 20406
 
CRIME AND PUNISHMENT ENGL 3363-R01 Kelly, M.
What makes crime a crime and what constitutes just punishment?  This course will explore ideas about criminality and correction as reflected in literary texts.  We will also read crime narratives as taking other concerns-such as social conformity, religious redemption and political unrest.
Post-1800, ALC
  TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 17407
 
ROMANTICS & THEIR WORLD ENGL 3424-R01 Myers, M.
Around the beginning of the nineteenth century, those writers we now call the Romantics sensed in their world the dawning of a new age, filled with hopes and fears for the power of human creativity and control. This course examines the era's attitudes toward nature, culture, war, peace, self, and other as reflected by its prolific and proliferating writers and readers.
Post-1800
  MR 10:00-11:15

CRN 20150
 
AMERICAN DREAM IN LIT ENGL 3436-R01 Kavros, H.
In the course we will explore the changing conceptions of success and business in American literature in genres including the sermon, autobiography, short story, novel, and drama, and through literary periods including Puritanism, Transcendentalism, Realism, and Naturalism.
Post-1800, ALC
  MR 8:30-9:45

CRN 18205
 
OSCAR WILDE ENGL 3453-R01 McElligott, M.
In this course we will concentrate on the writings of Oscar Wilde. We will discuss, then attempt to get past, the notoriety of his life, the scandal of his trial, and the opinion of many of his contemporaries that he was essentially a flaneur, who might have been a brilliant conversationalist, but was a merely talented writer. The very diversity of his work encouraged this opinion (as did Wilde himself), and we will explore his mastery of many genres, both comedic and tragic: his fiction, including The Picture of Dorian Gray, the fairy tales he wrote for his children, his literary criticism, his poetry, and his plays. And please remember: "A really well-made buttonhole is the only link between Art and Nature."
Service Learning
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 17393
 
PIRANDELLO IN CONTEXT ENGL 3471-R01 Parmeggiani, F.
THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED.   TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 19920
 
MAJOR AMERICAN AUTHORS ENGL 3653-R01 Cornell, E.
This course provides an introduction to major American authors.
Post-1800, ALC
  TR 5:30-6:45

CRN 19833
 
POSTWAR U.S. LIT & CULT ENGL 3662-R01 Nothrop, M.
This interdisciplinary seminar analyzes cultural trends and counter-cultural movements of the post-WWII war era as represented in American literature and history.  Topics include the Cold War and containment culture, the racial politics of suburbanization, the Beats and the counterculture, student radicalism, the civil rights struggle and Black Power, the anti-war movement, environmentalism, the sexual revolution, cultural conservatism, and questions of history, identity, and responsibility.
Post-1800, ALC, EP3, Iterdisciplinary Capstone
  TF 2:30-3:45

CRN 19840
 
COMING OF AGE, ASIAN AMER ENGL 3665-R01 Kim, James
In this course we will examine a variety of ways in which contemporary Asian-American authors have responded to the difficulty of growing up as outsiders.
Post-1800, Fulfills the Pluralism requirement
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 19834
 
FOOD AND GLOBALIZATION ENGL 3684-R01 Kim, Julie
This course will examine scholarship on food and globalization from a range of disciplinary perspectives, including anthropological, sociological, historical, and literary.  It will also examine the interdisciplinary fields of food studies and globalization studies to discuss the development of global exchange networks and their impact on consumer cultures and notions of identity in the United States and beyond.
Post-1800, EP3, Iterdisciplinary Capstone
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 19829
 
AMERICAN WRITERS IN PARIS ENGL 3701-R01 Collins, C.
As a capital of modern Western culture, Paris has long been attractive to experimental artists from other countries, a home in exile to find supportive audiences, publishers, and collaborators. American writers were led to Paris early in the 20th century by such figures as Wharton, Stein, and Pound, who were followed in roughly two movements: after WWI, the "Lost Generation" of Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and others, and after WWII, a circle of African American authors including Wright, Baldwin, and Himes. Through a selection of their works, as well as the art and music of the period, this course will explore the creative aims and cultural contexts of these three groups.
Post-1800, ALC
  TR 5:30-6:45

CRN 18204
 
EXTRAORDINARY BODIES ENGL 3843-R01 Farland, M.
From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives.
Post-1800, Senior Values
  W 11:30-1:59

CRN 18206
 
MAJOR VICTORIAN POETS ENGL 3921-R01 Hassett, C.
Major Victorian Poets examines the works of Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning and Christina Rossetti.  The focus will be on their dramatic monologues, wild narratives, and bi-lingual love poems with some attention to the mutations of these genres in the 20th and 21st century.
Post-1800
  MR 11:30-12:45

CRN 19830
 
HOBBITS/HEROES/HUBRIS ENGL 4096-R01 Holm, M.
In this course we will read Tolkien's The Hobbit and several works each by Lewis, L'Engle, Cooper and LeGuin. We will discuss fantasy as a genre, the maturation of the protagonist and the issues of good vs evil, social responsibility and spiritual foundations.
Post-1800, Senior Values, EP4
  M 2:30-4:59

CRN 19835
 
MODERN AMERICAN FICTION ENGL 4139-R01 Giannone, R.
This course considers modern American fiction of the twentieth century from a variety of critical perspectives.
Post-1800, ALC, American Studies, Senior Values
  T 2:30-5:00

CRN 22026
 
JAZZ AGE, LIT & CULTURE ENGL 4604-R01 Caldwell, M.
The glamour and glitz of the 1920s era known as "The Jazz Age" is the subject of this course, which examines changes in the literature and culture of the period between World War I and the end of Prohibition in 1933. The class examines popular culture, politics, and economic change in these years, through the lens of writers like Hemingway, Fitzgerald, and Faulkner, as well as the writers of the Harlem Renaissance and the first wave of women's liberation. Sample topics include the Great Migration, World War I, the New Negro, the rise of the Ku Klux Klan, urban transformations, consumerism, homosexuality and the influence of jazz and blues in music.
Post-1800, ALC
  R 2:30-4:39

CRN 19824
 
SENIOR VALUES AT ROSE HILL:
EXTRAORDINARY BODIES  ENGL 3843-R01 Farland, M.
From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will studythe experience of people with anomalous bones from avariety of personal and social perspectives.
Post-1800, Senior Values
   W 11:30-1:59

CRN 18206
 
HOBBITS/HEROES/HUBRIS ENGL 4096-R01 Holm, M.
In this course we will read Tolkien's The Hobbit and several works each by Lewis, L'Engle, Cooper and LeGuin. We will discuss fantasy as a genre, the maturation of the protagonist and the issues of good vs evil, social responsibility and spiritual foundations.
Post-1800, Senior Values, EP4
  M 2:30-4:59

CRN 19835
 
BIBLE IN ENGLISH POETRY ENGL 4135-R02 Caldwell, M.
This course studies some of the books of the Bible which have been most influential on English literature, together with English poetry and critical texts, from the Middle Ages to the present, which have been influenced by these biblical books. We will study the various English versions of the Bible and their backgrounds, but the focus will be on the Authorized Version (“King James Bible”) of 1611. The course will proceed sequentially through the Bible from Genesis through Revelation. At each class meeting we will discuss a key biblical text alongside a variety of poems, from all periods, inspired by or related to it.
Pre-1800, Senior Values, EP4
  MR 2:30-4:59

CRN 19824
 
MODERN AMERICAN FICTION ENGL 4139-R01 Giannone, R.
This course considers modern American fiction of the twentieth century from a variety of critical perspectives.
Post-1800, ALC, American Studies, Senior Values
  T 2:30-5:00

CRN 22026
       
Creative Writing Courses at Rose Hill:
THE POET'S CRAFT ENGL 3028-R01  Brandt, C.
An introduction to the craft of writing poetry. Student manuscripts are the subject of assignments and class discussions.
Creative Writing
  TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 17399
 
ARC OF THE NOVEL  ENGL 3043-R01  Nair, M.
Robert Olen Butler says that what is essential to any work of narrative art is a “character who yearns.” If this is the impulse that sets most novels in motion—for instance, we could describe Fitzgerald's Gatsby as a poor young man who triesto win the loveof a richgirl—it is the threat to this desire and the protagonist's attempts to overcome it that generates a sense of urgency and drama. In this class we will pay particular attention to the composition of the novel from a writer's point of view. We will consider development of protagonists and minor characters; voice, perspective and form; beginnings, endings and formal wholeness; sustaining narrative arcs; compelling a reader's interest for the duration of the text, and various aspects necessary to create a compelling work. Students will have the opportunity to make significant progress on a novel already begun in workshops and in conferences with the instructor.
Creative Writing
   MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 19843
 
FAMILY MATTERS : MEMOIR ENGL 3071-E01 Ehrenberg, E
We all have stories about family, but how do you shape this charged material into good narrative? Mary Karr, the celebrated author of three memoirs, writes that "The emotional stakes a memoirist bets with could not be higher." In this course, students will have the chance to try their hands at some of the most potent history anyone can tackle -- their own.
Writing
  M 6:30-9:15

CRN 20756
 
HUMOR: PUNCH UP YOUR PROSE
ENGL 3079-R01 Caldwell, M.
Did you hear the one about the creative writing student who blended strong prose with a sense of humor? Probably not, since so many don’t. Or maybe they just don’t think they’re allowed. In this workshop setting, you’ll learn to inject humor into your prose by connecting with your comic voice. We’ll begin by reading and discussing the work of legendary wits including James Thurber and Dorothy Parker, as well as contemporary humorists such as David Sedaris, Nora Ephron, Dave Barry, and Sloane Crosley. Writing assignments will help strengthen your voice across four basic forms: the comic essay, the comic novel or short story, the topical news column, and the parody piece. We’ll also do some in-class exercises designed to shake off preconceived notions of “serious” prose, and help you find the funny in the characters, dialogue, and situations you create. Whether your goal is to write a Shouts and Murmurs piece for The New Yorker, a post for  Funnyordie.com, or begin a book-length humor collection, the first step is the same: take your sense of humor seriously.
Creative Writing
   TR 5:30-6:45

CRN 21607
 
Cross-Listed WRITING Courses at Rose Hill:
JOURNALISM WORKSHOP COMM 2211-R01 Knobel, B.
A practical workshop course in writing news, features, commentary, reviews and sports articles for The Ram, the paper, the Fordham Undergraduate Research Journal and other student media at Rose Hill. Students who are writing for The Ram and other student print media are encouraged to take the course, but Journalism Workshop is open to all. Student will be encouraged to take assignments for The Ram to gain writing experience and clippings. Article assignments will also be given by the professor to students who do not wish to write for a student publication. In class, students will workshop articles to improve them before publication. We will also address basic journalism skills including interviewing, story research and using online media resources.   M 2:30-3:45

CRN 10422
 
JOURNALISM WORKSHOP - FNN
COMM 2212-R01 West, T.
A practical workshop course in writing news, feature, commentary or sports articles, or doing graphics & layout for The Observer. Students will work as writers or on the layout staff.   M 7:30-9:00

CRN 19704
 
JOURNALISM WORKSHOP - ONLINE
COMM 2213-R01 Jordan, J.
A practical workshop course in writing news, feature, commentary or sports articles, or doing graphics & layout for The Observer. Students will work as writers or on the layout staff.   F 10:00-11:15

CRN 19705
 
JOURNALISM WORKSHOP COMM 2214-R01 Bodarky, G.
A practical workshop course in writing news, feature, commentary or sports articles, or doing graphics & layout for The Observer. Students will work as writers or on the layout staff.   W 6:30-8:00

CRN 20821
 
Fordham College at Lincoln Center
REQUIRED Courses at Lincoln Center:
THEORY FOR ENGLISH MAJORS ENGL 3045-L01 Stein, Jordan
This course introduces the English major to debates in literary and critical theory. The goal of the course is to reflect on reading strategies, textual practices and language itself.  We will engage with a range of critical and social issues shaping the field of literary studies today, while considering, more generally, the relationship between theory and literature.
Fulfills English theory requirement.
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 20175
 
Pre-1800 Courses at Lincoln Center:
MEDIEVAL MYSTICS ENGL 3136-L01 Albin, A.
During the Middle Ages where Catholic Christianity informed virtually all aspects of public and private life, the claim to genuine mystical experience—that is, the claim to direct, unmediated experience of God—could not have carried higher stakes.  Starting with foundational texts, we will read the synaesthetic ecstasies of maverick hermit Richard Rolle, the regimented monastic instruction of Walter Hilton, and the complex language games of The Cloud of Unknowing; we will unravel one of the great, gem-like masterpieces of the Alliterative Revival, the anonymous Pearl, probe the intersections of gender, text, and faith in the writings of Julian of Norwich (the first woman writer in English) and Margery Kempe (the first autobiographer in English), and examine mysticism’s secular dimension in Malory’s telling of the Quest for the Holy Grail
Pre-1800, ALC
  TF 2:30-3:45

CRN 19904
 
MILTON ENGL 3207-L01 Boyle, F.
A survey of the major poetry and prose of John Milton with strong emphasis on Paradise Lost.
Pre-1800, ALC
  W 8:30-11:15

CRN 20160
 
PLAYS AND PLAYERS, 1600-1700 ENGL 3319-C01 Sherman, S
Beginning in the 1660's, thestage mirrored the worldin ways unprecedented: new performers (actresses trod the boards for the first time ever); new protagonists (middle-class as well as aristocratic); new shapes of comedy and lighting; new styles of acting; and new audiences keen to absorb, assess, and gossip about whatever transpired on stage, in the stalls, and behind the scenes. We'll investigate all this innovation, through play texts, performances (live and recorded), and all the modes of writing (diaries, letters, autobiographies, reviews) by which spectators sought to preserve the evanescent but often spellbinding experience of going to a play.
Pre-1800, ALC
  T 6:00-8:45

CRN 20178
 
Post-1800 Courses at Lincoln Center:
EARLY VICTORIAN NOVELS ENGL 3417-L01 Vranjes, V.
In this course we will read novels written in the first two decades of Queen Victoria’s reign (1837-1857). We will examine the assigned texts in their literary and cultural contexts and investigate how these works helped usher in and shape what has come to be known as the “golden age” of the novel in Britain. In other words, we will try to understand what makes these novels “Victorian” and what makes them “early.” Possible writers include Charlotte Brontë, Emily Brontë, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Gaskell, William Makepeace Thackeray, and Anthony Trollope.
Post-1800, ALC
  MR 10:00-11:15

CRN 19901
 
VIRGINIA WOOLF ENGL 3504-L01 Fernald, A.
Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) was one of the great writers of the 20th century. In this course, we will read three of her novels and "A Room of One's Own", her influential feminist essay. Never formally educated, she was also one of the great readers and critics of her time. Brilliant, funny, and hugely curious about her world, she wrote about virtually everything that might interest a person in her time: war, sex, friendship, reading, food, money, art, inspiration, jealousy, fashion, walking, and marriage to name some. As we read her work, we will look at how she transformed the tradition she read into revolutionary art. Then, after spring break, we will read four novels by writers who claim Woolf as an influence, major or minor, direct or indirect. Each of these writers, from England, Colombia, the United States, and Egypt, finds a different Virginia Woolf. With your final project, you will have the opportunity to write about the Woolf you discover through reading her words and discussing them in class.
Post-1800, ALC
  TF 11:30-12:45

CRN 20020
 
THEATER AND THE AVANT-GARDE ENGL 3529-L01 Enelow, S.
“Avant-garde” was originally a French military term for the first line of battle, but in the late nineteenth century, it came to signify the radical new artmovements cropping up with abundance throughout Europe and, later, the United States. Rejecting social and aesthetic norms, these movements called for artistic (and often political) revolution, and many seized on theater as the perfect place to make a scandal of their ideas. After the Second World War,the center of gravity for the avant-garde shifted from Europe to New York, where a new generation built on earlier innovations and sought to reflect new realities. But throughout the long twentieth century, avant-garde artists put forth wildly different views of theater and its role in society, and some rejected live performance all together. In this course, we will consider the twentieth-century avant-garde’s complicated relationship to theater and its potential configurations of politics, text, and spectacle, and analyze theatrical experiments in the context of other art forms. We will read manifestos, plays, and performance and anti-performance texts of all stripes, and attend several live art events. Assignments will include one practical theatrical project.
Post-1800, ALC
  TF 1:00-2:15

CRN 20155
 
LIT ADAPTATIONS:AFAM LIT FILM ENGL 3627-C01 Tyler, D.
From Malcolm X and Alex Haley’s The Autobiography of Malcolm X (1965) to Ntozake Shange’s For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf (1975), African American literature has certainly inspired several film adaptations throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries (like Spike Lee’s Malcolm X [1992] and Tyler Perry’s For Colored Girls [2010]). Indeed, the number of cinematic adaptations of African American literature suggests that there is not only a particular fascination with transforming literary works into films but also an abiding interest in seeing how a text will translate onto the big screen. This class will analyze selected texts (such as Alice Walker’s The Color Purple [1982], Terry McMillan’s Waiting to Exhale [1992], and Sapphire’s Push [1996]) alongside their cinematic counterparts (such as Steven Spielberg’s The Color Purple [1985], Forrest Whitaker’s Waiting to Exhale [1995], and Lee Daniels’s Precious [2009]) to discuss how literary and filmic texts measure up on their own worth as well as to examine how these texts mutually inform one another, particularly in the ways that they become remembered in the American cultural imagination.
Post-1800, AFAM Lit Film
  W 6:00-8:45

CRN 20520
 
THE BODY IN COMPARATIVE WOMEN’S LITERATURE AND ART ENGL 3670-C01 Frost, E.
How do we understand relationships among identity, gender, race, and the human body? How do recent women writers and artists explore this question? This course will examine visual art and writing since the 1980s that depicts--and seeks to understand--human embodiment, challenging the idea of a physical norm in order to expand how bodies (especially women's) are represented and known.
Post-1800, Interdisciplinary Capstone Core
  M 6:00-8:45

CRN 20177
 
EXTRAORDINARY BODIES ENGL 3843-L01 Appels, J.
From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives.
Post-1800, Senior Values
  W 8:30-11:15

CRN 15691
 
PSYCH HORROR LIT & FILM ENGL 4036-C01 Cassuto, L./
Wertz, F.
This course focuses on the so-called paradox of horror: why do we enjoy an experience that is designed to make us feel uncomfortable?  If the question is simple, the answer is not, and the paradox continues to occupy a main strand of horror scholarship.  By combining literary theory—especially reader-response—with the major psychological theories of emotion, this course centers on the paradox of horror and addresses questions of many kinds that arise from it.  In this course, students will learn the distinct methods and conceptual frameworks of literary theory and psychology as well as how they can work together to help us understand a complex phenomenon like the attraction of horror.  The paradox of horror and the questions following from it require an interdisciplinary perspective and tools, and this course will provide both.  We will begin with the concrete experiences of the phenomena themselves:  reading classic and contemporary horror fiction and watching horror films.  The dialogue of experience and theory will enable us to consider the interconnection of horror and such interdisciplinary themes as human etiquette, otherness, the body, humor, desire and pleasure, the unconscious, madness, transformation, the holy, and death.
Post-1800, Interdisciplinary Capstone Core
  R 8:30-11:15

CRN 20069
 
senior values at Lincoln Center:
EXTRAORDINARY BODIES ENGL 3843-L01 Appels, J.
From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with odd bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bones from a variety of personal and social perspectives.
Post 1800, American Studies, Comp Lit
  W 8:30-11:00

CRN 15691
 
CROSS LISTED Courses at Lincoln Center:
JOURNALISM WORKSHOP COMM 2211-L01 Stone, E.
 Journalism Workshop is a two- credit course for writers and reporters who want to write or do multimedia for THE OBSERVER, the award-winning newspaper at Fordham College at Lincoln Center. The paper edition is; a biweekly that is published every other Thursday.  The online edition--at fordhamobserver.com--is updated daily.  Students may write for news, features, opinion, arts and culture or sports, in which case their work will appear in both hardcopy and online.  Students may also write for the online Blog (the LC Radar) or may do multimedia (photo essays, videos, podcasts, sound slides) for the online edition. The faculty adviser is the course instructor. However, all editors attend Journalism Workshop in order to meet with their writers, and it is the forum where editors and writers/reporters workshop stories-in-progress, discuss pertinent ethical issues, various genres (Q&A, profile, commentary) and matters of publication style.
Writing, Cross-listed with Communications and Media Studies
  T 1:00-2:15

CRN 10197
 
FEMINIST THEORIES IN INTER-CULT WMST 3010-L01 Hoffman, A.
An examination of contemporary feminist theories, with attention to the construction of gender, sexuality, class, race, ethnicity, and age.  Students will analyze Western and non-Western writings from an interdisciplinary perspective.
Fulfills the Pluralism requirement, EP3,
Cross-listed with Women's Studies
  MR 4:00-5:15

CRN 17752
 
INTERVIEWS & PROFILES COMM 3081-L01 Belsky, G.
Intensive work in developing and writing profiles accompanied by readings from Boswell to Mailer.
Writing,
Cross-listed with Communications and Media Studies
  F 10:00-12:45

CRN 10205
 
CRIME, LITERATURE AND LATINOS LALS 3344-C01 Emilio, E.
This course is designed topresent an overview of the problems for decision in the promulgation, invocation,and administration of a law of crimes.  Topics include theories of crime, the purpose of punishment, and specific types of crimes.  The rights of minorities will be discussed within the context of a viable criminal law.
Fulfills the Pluralism requirement, Cross-listed with Latin American Studies
  R 6:00-8:45

CRN 20096
 
SCREENWRITING I COMM 3405-C01 Miller, M.
Analyzing and writing screenplays for theatrical motion pictures.
Creative Writing, Cross-listed with Communications and Media Studies
  M 6:00-8:45

CRN 20609
 
SCREENWRITING II COMM 3409-L01 Grimaldi, J.
Analyzing feature screenplays and working towards production of a feature length screenplay.
Creative Writing, Cross-listed with Communications and Media Studies
  T 2:30-5:15

CRN 10218
 
THE CITY IN LITERATURE & ART COLI 3450-L01 Hoffman, A.
The structures, spaces, people, and life patterns of cities in the imagination of writers and visual artists from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. We will focus on Berlin, Paris, and New York, using the work of Walter Benjamin as a stimulus to thinking about our own relationship to the urban environment.
Cross-listed with Comparative Literature, EP3
  T 2:30-5:15

CRN 19868
 
CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN LITERATURES AFAM 3693-L01 Mustafa, F.
Contemporary works from around the continent, including a selection of Anglophone literatures of South, West, and East Africa and translation into English from Portuguese, French, Arabic, and Kiswahili. 
Fulfills the globalism requirement, EP3, Cross-listed with African-American Studies
  MW 11:30-12:45

CRN 19867
 
PLAYWRITING THEA 3700-L01 Jones, D.
This playwriting workshop is the cornerstone of the playwriting program.  It intentionally welcomes writers of many levels of experience to one dynamic space.  The goals of the workshop are to teach basic craft and create an environment that will guide the writers’ explanation of their individual voices.  We concentrate on four major issues: storytelling, character, structure, and language.
Creative Writing, Cross-listed with Theater Studies
  T 11:30-2:15

CRN 11494
 
REPRESENTING ART IN LITERATURE COLI 4412-C01 Clark, A.
Art and its literary representation in 17th and 18th century France and England. In this seminar, we will examine the literary representation of art (portraits, landscape, etc.) in novels. What is the status of these representations? In what ways does this status change from the 17th to the end of the 18th centuries? In order to analyze the import of visual representation in literary texts, we will also read a number of works of early art criticism both in England and France as well as contemporary criticism and theory. As such, we will try to determine the interrelation between history of the visual and literary culture in the early modern period. Texts can be read in the original language if desired.
Creative Writing, Cross-listed with Communications and Media Studies
  W 6:00-8:45

CRN 20405
 
Creative Writing Courses at Lincoln Center:
CRITICAL EDGE: WRITG-ARTS ENGL 3004-L01 Kupperman, K.
This course is for people with a passion for and strong opinions about movies, books, music, and the theater.  We will explore low and high culture, writing features, news stories, interviews, reviews, and opinion pieces. Students will attend performances, gather facts and materials, conduct interviews, and write about everything from live performances to independent film to visual art and contemporary writing. Students will develop interview and research techniques, and we will discuss subjects germane to the creation and viewing of art, including impartiality, originality, intuition, and the difference between being a fan and a critic. Sharing writing in a workshop format, we will focus on structure, coherence, style, and voice. Guest speakers will include professions writers, visual artists, performing artists, and others.
Writing
  MR 4:00-4:15

CRN 20157
 
CHILDREN’S LITERATURE WORKSHOP ENGL 3011-C01 Wyeth, Sharon
A creative writing workshop where students will engage in writing for younger readers. Special attention will be given to theme, structure, character, location and voice. Starting with a story idea grounded in the writer's own experience or observations or in a theme that is socially relevant, each participant will develop a portfolio of text consisting of first draft, revised and polished pages of fiction. Illustrative readings that identify with the issuesof contemporary children will support this process.
Creative Writing
  M 6:00-8:45

CRN 20179
 
PROSE POETRY/FLASH FICTION ENGL 3062-L01 Frost, E.
A workshop of prose poetry and flash fiction.
Creative Writing
  MW 1:00-2:15

CRN 20158
 
NEW YORK IS MY CAMPUS ENGL 3066-L01 Kupperman, K.
New York is one of the most vibrant, culturally diverse, and historically significant cities in the world. From SoHo to Harlem, from Chinatown to the Upper East Side, New York is a treasure trove for the curious. In this creative writing workshop, you will write about the people you meet and the places you go, from museums and galleries to music and theatre to parks and playgrounds. You'll explore street fairs and markets, restaurants and historical sites. You will read personal essays, cultural criticism, journalism, and reviews in New York-based periodicals including New York Magazine, The New Yorker, The New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Time Out New York, and the New York Post, among others. And we will go on field trips and walking tours to some of the most interesting places in the city. By the end of the month you will have created a blog about your experience, filled with personal essays, literary journalism and reviews.
Writing
  MR 2:30-3:45

CRN 19902
 
LITERARY MAG WORKSHOP I ENGL 3379-L01 Gambito, S.
The aim of this workshop is to give students the experience and skills necessary to create a literary magazine in alignment with the most recent and rapid changes in literary consumption.  Working collaboratively, students will endeavor to expand the boundariesof the literary magazine by examining the best powers of print and online venues in order to achieve the maximum impact of both.   Students will write creative pieces and undertake a study of past and current print literary magazines.
Enrollment is by instructor permission only.
Creative Writing
  W 8:30-11:15

CRN 20405
 
TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN ESSAY AND MEMOIR ENGL 3611-L01 Stone, Elizabeth
After an acknowledgement of earlier memoirists such as Twain, Fitzgerald, Orwell and Baldwin, this course focuses on contemporary practitioners such as Joan Didion, Annie Dillard, Geoffrey Wolff, Tobias Wolff.  Considerations include shifting notions of public and private, the construction of persona, and the impact of TV and radio on print, especially in regard to “voice,” self-disclosure and pathology.
Writing
  TF 10:00-11:15

CRN 20155
 
GRADUATE COURSES AT LINCOLN CENTER:
For the policy on undergraduate admission to Master Class courses, go to www.fordham.edu/creativewriting - Undergraduate, Application to Master Class Writing Courses.
 
MASTER CLASS: CREATIVE ONLINE
ENGL 5966-L01 Gambito, S.
This multi-genre writing workshop will take on the websiteas a performance space for creative avatars. What possibilities for creative projects lie in the malleability of the Internet — its multi-directional readability and possibilities for instant gratification editing? Students will design websites, workshop website content, generate multi-media through collaborative teams and make presentations.
Creative Writing
  W 6:00-8:30

CRN 20781
 
FORDHAM COLLEGE OF PROFESSIONAL and CONTINUING STUDIES 
English Electives and Writing Courses are listed within the Rose Hill and Lincoln Center sections.
 
Graduate Courses Open to Undergraduates
*Unless otherwise specified 5000-level courses listed under Graduate / Courses are open to Seniors with the instructor's and graduate director's permission and after graduate students have registered. Email requests to instructors must include Student's Name and FIN, Dean's email, Home School. Please email instructor's approval to marstern@fordham.edu. Requests will be confirmed at least one week before courses start.
 
 
 
 

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