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Course Requirements









major requirements

The major requires 12 courses, up to 8 of which can count toward the core curriculum through appropriate course selection. In the list of courses below, R stands for Fordham College at Rose Hill, and L for Fordham College at Lincoln Center.

Students should officially declare the major in the the freshman year and contact the program director to receive advising on the required freshman and sophomore courses. The major can also be declared in the sophomore or junior year.

major Requirements for students declaring in fall 2013 & BEYOND (Degree in environmental studies)
Freshman Introductory Course 
This course provides an overview of environmental problems and their societal causes and effects from natural science, social science and humanities perspectives, and introduces students to interdisciplinary methods of integrating these disciplines in policy solutions to environmental problems.

1. One course in introductory environmental studies.
ENST 1000-Introduction to Environmental Studies (offered every spring semester at Rose Hill),
or ENVP 2000-Introduction to Environmental Policy (offered every spring semester at Rose Hill),
 
Freshman/Sophomore Natural Science Courses
The following natural science courses provide foundational knowledge of physics, chemistry, and biology. Additional natural science courses can be taken by choosing a Concentration in Conservation Biology and minoring in Biological Sciences (see the "Concentrations & Career Tracks" page on the program website). If you have relevant AP courses with a score of at least 4, these courses might count toward the following requirements.

2-4. Three of the following natural science courses, at least 1 of which should be a physical science and 1 a life science.
BISC 1002-Ecology: A Human Approach (R) or NSCI 1040-People and the Living Environment (L)
CHEM 1109-Chemistry of the Environment (R)
ENVS 1000-Introduction to Environmental Science (R, L) (students must fulfill prerequisites for this course)
NSCI 1020-Physical Sciences in Today's World (L)
NSCI 2010-Global Ecology (L) (students must fulfill prerequisites for this course)
NSCI 2060-Environment: Science, Law & Policy (L)
PHYS 1203-Environmental Physics (R)

The following courses can also be used (students must fulfill any prerequisites for these courses):
BISC 1000 - LIFE ON THE PLANET EARTH (R)
BISC 1010 - FOUNDATIONS OF BIOLOGY (R)
BISC 1401 - INTRO TO BIOLOGY I (R)
BISC 1402 - INTRO TO BIOLOGY II (R)
BISC 1403 - INTRO BIOLOGY I (R)
BISC 1404 - INTRO BIOLOGY II (R)
CHEM 1321-General Chemistry I (R)
NSCI 1403-General Biology I (L)
NSCI 1404-General Biology II (L)
NSCI 1423-Concepts in Biology I (L)
NSCI 1424-Concepts in Biology II (L)
NSCI 1321-General Chemistry I (L)
NSCI 1501-General Physics I (L)

PHYS 1501-General Physics I (R)
PHYS 1601-Introductory Physics I (R)
PHYS 1701-Physics I (R)

Freshman/Sophomore Social Science Courses
The following courses provide foundational skills in economics and statistics. If you have relevant AP courses with a score of at least 4, these courses might count toward the following requirements.


5. One course in introductory economics.
ECON 1200-Basic Microeconomics (R, L),
or alternatively ECON 1100-Basic Macroeconomics (R, L)


6. One course in social science statistics.
ECON 2140-Statistics (R, L)
PSYC 2000-Statistics (R, L)
SOCI 2606-Social Science Statistics (R, L)
SOCI 2690-Urban Research Methods (R)
SSCI 2606-Social Science Statistics (L)

Upper Policy Areas, Electives & Concentrations
The following courses provide advanced knowledge and methods in the policy areas of environmental economics, design, politics and law, history, anthropology, media and communications, and ethics and justice. To develop a Concentration in one of these areas, see the "Concentrations & Career Tracks" page on this website.

7. One course in environmental history and culture.
HIST 3990-North American Environmental History (R, L), or one of the following courses:
ANTH 2700-You Are What You Eat: Anthropology of Food (R)
ANTH 3371-People and the Environment (L)

ANTH 3373/4373-Environmental and Human Survival (R)
ANTH 3380-Hazards, Disasters and the Human Experience (R)
COMM 4311-Media and the Environment (R)
HIST 3629-Maritime Cities (L)
HIST 3772-Hudson River (R, L)
HIST 3992-Capitalism (R, L)
HIST 3993-Environmental History: NYC (L, R)
HIST 4780-History of Capitalism (R)
HIST 4990-History of Climate Change (R)
HIST 5730-History of Capitalism (R)
SOCI 3145-Environment, Technology and Society (L, R)
URST 5070-Environmental History of the American City (R)

8. One course in environmental economics.
ECON 3850-Environmental Economics (R, L), or one of the following courses:
ECON 3385-Economics of Energy (L)
ECON 3430-Sustainable Business (R)
ECON 3840-Environmental Economic Policy (R)
HIST 3992-Capitalism (R, L)
HIST 4780-History of Capitalism (R)
HIST 5730-History of Capitalism (R)
MGBU 3430-Sustainable Business (R)

9. One course in environmental politics and  law.
POSC 2507/3307-Environmental Politics (R, L), or one of the following courses:
NSCI 2060-Environment: Science, Law, and Policy(L)
POSC 3131-Politics of Urban Health and Environment (R)
HUAF 2001-Introduction to Global Health (L, R)

10. One course in environmental ethics and justice.
PHIL 4302-Environmental Policy and Ethics (R), PHIL 3109/4409-Environmental Ethics (R,L), PHIL 3712-Global Environment and Justice (L, R), or one of the following courses:
ENGL 3632 Postmodern Fiction and Environmental Justice
MLAL 4002-Animal Rights Literature & Film (R)
PHIL 3722-Native American Philosophy (R)
PHIL 3962-Sustainability & Process (R)
THEO 4008-Religion and Ecology (R)
THEO 4520-Animals, Angels and Aliens: Beyond Humanist Christian Thought (R)

11. One course in sustainable design.
VART 2055-Environmental Design, except that in some cases, with the program director's permission, one of the following courses may besubstituted:

VART 2050-Designing the City (R, L)
VART 2085-Sustainable New York (R, L)
VART 3055-Ecology for Designers (R, L)
ARHI 2555-Art and Ecology (R)

Senior Thesis Capstone
This course allows students to concentrate on a particular area of environmental studies in preparation for employment or graduate school, and is offered every spring semester at Rose Hill. It requires a 40 page research thesis with possible inclusion of an internship as a case study. It can be used to fulfill the senior thesis capstone requirement only when taken in the senior year, i.e., in one of the student's last two semesters.

12. ENST 4000-Senior Thesis or ENVP 4000-Research Seminar

Internship Credit
Students can receive credit for an environmental internship in the course SOCI 4902-Internship Seminar (R) offered each fall, though this course does not count to the major. The internhip can be used as a case study in ENST 4000-Senior Thesis taken in the senior year.

major Requirements for students declared PRIOR TO FALL 2013 (degree in environmental policy)
Freshman/Sophomore Introductory Course 
This course provides an overview of environmental problems from natural science, social science and humanities perspectives, and introduces students to interdisciplinary methods of integrating these disciplines in policy solutions to environmental problems.

1. One course in introductory environmental policy.
ENVP 2000-Introduction to Environmental Policy or ENST 1000 Introduction to Environmental Studies (offered every spring semester at Rose Hill)
 

Freshman/Sophomore Science and Skills Courses
The following core curriculum courses provide foundational knowledge of chemistry or physics and biology, additional exposure to environmental problems from natural science perspectives, and foundational skills in economics, mathematics, statistics, and computer science. An additional natural science course can be taken under requirement #13 below, and students have the opportunity of choosing a Concentration in Conservation Biology and minoring in Biological Sciences (see the "Concentrations & Career Tracks" page on the program website). If you have relevant AP courses with a score of at least 4, these courses might count toward the following requirements.

2. One course in chemistry, physics, or earth science.
CHEM 1109-Chemistry of the Environment (R)
ENVS 1000-Introduction to Environmental Science (R, L)
NSCI 1020-Physical Sciences in Today's World (L)
PHYS 1203-Environmental Physics (R)

3. One course in ecology.
BISC 1002-Ecology: A Human Approach (R)
BISC 2561-Ecology (R)
NSCI 1040-People and the Living Environment (L)
NSCI 2010-Global Ecology (L)

4. One course in introductory economics.
ECON 1200-Basic Microeconomics (R, L),
or alternatively ECON 1100-Basic Macroeconomics (R, L)


5. One course in mathematics. 
MATH 1203-Applied Calculus I (R, L)
MATH 1206-Calculus I (R, L)


6. One course in social science statistics.
ECON 2140-Statistics (R, L)
PSYC 2000-Statistics (R, L)
SOCI 2606-Social Science Statistics (R, L)
SOCI 2690-Urban Research Methods (R)
SSCI 2606-Social Science Statistics (L)

7. One course in computer and information science.
CISC 2500-Information and Data Management (R, L), except that in some cases, with the program director's permission, one of the following courses may be substituted:
ECON 2142-Statistical Decison Making
(R,L) (prerequisite: ECON 2140-Statistics)
VART 2003-Digital Tools
(R,L)
VART 2400 Website Design (R, L)
VART 3250-Design and the Web (R, L)


Upper Policy Areas, Electives & Concentrations
The following courses provide advanced knowledge and methods in the policy areas of environmental economics, design, politics and law, history, anthropology, media and communications, and ethics and justice. To develop a Concentration in one of these areas, see the "Concentrations & Career Tracks" page on this website.

8. One course in environmental history and culture.
HIST 3990-North American Environmental History (R, L), or one of the following courses:
ANTH 2700-You Are What You Eat: Anthropology of Food (R)
ANTH 3371-People and the Environment (L)
ANTH 3373/4373-Environmental and Human Survival (R)
ANTH 3380-Hazards, Disasters and the Human Experience (R)
COMM 4311-Media andthe Environment (R)
HIST 3629-Maritime Cities (L)
HIST 3772-Hudson River (R, L)
HIST 3992-Capitalism (R, L)
HIST 3993-Environmental History: NYC (L, R)
HIST 4780-History of Capitalism (R)
HIST 4990-History of Climate Change (R)
HIST 5730-History of Capitalism (R)
SOCI 3145-Environment, Technology and Society (L, R)
URST 5070-Environmental History of the American City (R)

9. One course in environmental economics.
ECON 3850-Environmental Economics (R, L), or one of the following courses:
ECON 3385-Economics of Energy (L)
ECON 3430-Sustainable Business (R)
ECON 3840-Environmental Economic Policy (R)
HIST 3992-Capitalism (R, L)
HIST 4780-History of Capitalism (R)
HIST 5730-History of Capitalism (R)
MGBU 3430-Sustainable Business (R)

10. One course in environmental politics and  law.
POSC 2507/3307-Environmental Politics (R, L), or one of the following courses:
NSCI 2060-Environment: Science, Law, and Policy(L)
POSC 3131-Politics of Urban Health and Environment (R)
HUAF 2001-Introduction to Global Health (L, R)

11. One course in environmental ethics and justice.
PHIL 4302-Environmental Policy and Ethics (R), PHIL 3109/4409-Environmental Ethics (R,L), PHIL 3712-Global Environment and Justice (L, R), or one of the following courses:
ENGL 3632 Postmodern Fiction and Environmental Justice
MLAL 4002-Animal Rights Literature & Film (R)
PHIL 3722-Native American Philosophy (R)
PHIL 3962-Sustainability & Process (R)
THEO 4008-Religion and Ecology (R)
THEO 4520-Animals, Angels and Aliens: Beyond Humanist Christian Thought (R)

12. One course in sustainable design.
VART 2055-Environmental Design, except that in some cases, with the program director's permission, one of the following courses may be substituted:

VART 2050-Designing the City (R, L)
VART 2085-Sustainable New York (R, L)
VART 3055-Ecology for Designers (R, L)
ARHI 2555-Art and Ecology (R)

13. One elective concentration course.
This course allows students to develop a Concentration in a particular environmental policy area, and should be chosen from either the above course lists (excluding lists under requirements #5 through 7 above) or the following list.
ANTH 3375-Ecotourism in Anthropology (R)
AFM 3684-Food and Globalization (R)
ANTH3722-Primate Ecology (R)
BISC 3405-Plant Biology (R)
BISC 3643-Microbiology (R)
BISC 4401-Tropical Ecology (R)
BISC 4642-Animal Behavior (R)
BISC 4601-Marine Biology (R)
COMM 3085-Science Journalism (L)
ENGL 3684-Food and Globalization (R)
HIST 3991-The American Indians (R, L)
SOCI 4902-Internship Seminar (R)


Senior Thesis Seminar
This course allows students to concentrate on a particular area of environmental policy in preparation for employment or graduate school, and is offered every spring semester at Rose Hill. It requires a 40 page research thesis in which an internship can be used as a case study. It can be used to fulfill the senior capstone requirement only when taken in the senior year, i.e., in one of the student's last two semesters.

14. ENVP 4000-Research Seminar or ENST 4000-Senior Thesis
 
Internship Credit
Students can receive credit for an environmental internship in the course SOCI 4902-Internship Seminar (R) offered each fall. This course fulfills "Eclective Concentration Course" Requirement. The internhip can be used as a case study in ENST 4000-Senior Thesis taken in the senior year.


Minor Requirements

1. One course in introductory environmental studies.
HIST 3990-North American Environmental History (R, L)

2. One course in chemistry, physics, or earth science.
CHEM 1109-Chemistry of the Environment (R)
CHEM 4340-Environmental Chemistry (R)
ENVS 1000-Introduction to Environmental Science (R, L)
NSCI 1020-Physical Sciences in Today's World (L)
PHYS 1203-Environmental Physics (R)

3. One course in ecology.

BISC 1002-Ecology: A Human Approach (R)
BISC 2561-Ecology (R)
BISC 4401-Tropical Ecology (R)
BISC 4601-Marine Biology (R)
BISC 4642-Animal Behavior (R)

NSCI 1040-People and the Living Environment (L)
NSCI 2010-Global Ecology (L)

4. Three elective courses.
ANTH 2700-You Are What You Eat: Anthropology of Food (R)
ANTH 3371-People and the Environment (L)

ANTH 3373/4373-Environment and Human Survival (R)
ANTH 3375-Ecotourism in Anthropology (R)
ANTH 3380-Hazards, Disasters and the Human Experience (R)
ARHI 2555-Art and Ecology (R)
COMM 4311-Media and the Environment (R)
ECON 3385-Economics of Energy (L)
ECON 3430-Sustainable Business (R)
ECON 3850-Environmental Economics (R, L)
ECON 3840-Environmental Economic Policy (R)
HIST 3629-Maritime Cities (L)
HIST 3772-Hudson River (R, L)
HIST 3990-North American Environmental History (R, L) (if not previously counted as "introductory environmental policy" requirement)
HIST 3991-The American Indians (R, L)
HIST 3992-Capitalism (R, L)
HIST 3993-Environmental History: NYC (L, R)
HIST 4780-History of Capitalism (R)
HIST 4990-History of Climate Change (R)
HIST 5730-History of Capitalism (R)
HUAF 2001-Introduction to Global Health (L, R)
MGBU 3430-Sustainable Business (B)
MLAL 4002-Animal Rights Literature & Film (R)
NSCI 2060-Environment: Science, Law, and Policy (L)
PHIL 3109/4409-Environmental Ethics (R, L)
PHIL 3712-Global Environment and Justice (L)
PHIL 3722-Native American Philosophy (R)
PHIL 3962-Sustainability & Process (R)
PHIL 4302-Environmental Policy and Ethics (R)
POSC 2507-EnvironmentalPolitics (R, L)
POSC 3131-Politics of Urban Health and Environment
SOCI 3145-Environment, Technology and Society (L, R)
SOCI 4902-Internship Seminar (R)
THEO 4008-Religion and Ecology (R)
THEO 4520-Animals, Angels and Aliens: Beyond Humanist Christian Thought (R)
URST 5070-Environmental History of the American City (R)
VART 2050-Designing the City (R,L)
VART 2051-Introduction to Urban Design Analysis (R, L)
VART 2055-Environmental Design (R, L)
VART 2085-Sustainable New York (R, L)
VART 3055-Ecology for Designers (R, L)

Internship Credit
Students can receive credit for an environmental internship in the course SOCI 4902-Internship Seminar (R) offered each fall. This course counts toward the minor.


Environmental Studies Courses

ENST 1000-Introduction to Environmental Studies/ENVP 2000-Introduction to Environmental Policy
This is the required introductory course formajors. It provides an interdisciplinary overview of environmental problems from the perspective of their societal causes and effects, introducing students to environmental policy methods in the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and applied arts and sciences. It should be taken in the freshman or sophomore year, but can also be taken in the junior year.

HIST 3990-North American Environmental History (core upper history course)
The is the required introductorycourse for minors and is a recommended elective course for majors. It explores various aspects of North American environmental history from colonial times to the present.

PHIL 4302-Environmental Policy and Ethics (core EP3 and Interdisciplinary Seminar course)

This is an elective course for majors and minors. This interdisciplinary seminar studies American environmental history, problems and policies with regard to the values or ethical questions involved in them as studied by environmental philosophy and ethics. Combining the disciplines of environmental policy, history, and environmental philosophy and ethics, it examines environmental issues such as climate change which are far too complex for any one discipline to fully understand. Philosphical and ethical dimensions of the following topics are explored: interdisciplinary environmental studies,; personal environmental history;global ecosystem health, climate change, and species extinction; the environmental histories of the Bronx and Fordham's Rose Hill Campus; environmental art and literature; the sciences of evolutionary biology, ecology and conseration biology; environmental economics and sustainable development economics; environmental politics and justice; animal psychology and animal rights; religion and nature; and feminism and nature. Real-time case studies, documentary films, and field trips will be used.

ENST 4000 Senior Thesis/ENVP 4000-Research Seminar
This capstone course is requiredfor all Environmental Policy majors inthe senior year, i.e., in one of the student’s last two semesters. Using methods in the natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and applied arts and sciences, students complete an interdisciplinary research thesis on an environmental problem or complete a professional internship with an internship thesis involving interdisciplinary research.


Crosslisted Courses

 

Thiscourse is an inquiry into the biological and cultural processes by which human populations have adapted to the world's diverse ecosystems. Particular attention is devoted to issues of group survival in difficult habitats and the environmental impact of preindustrial and recently Westernized cultures.
 
ANTH 3375-Ecotourism in Anthropology
Ecotourism is often defined as travel to places of natural or ecological interest, while having minimum impact on the environment. In this course, we will explore and evaluate this concept of ecotourism through an anthropological perspective. First we will look at examples of ecotourism, and examine the myriad ways in which it affects cultures and environments. Readings, discussions, lectures, and projects will be used to see how (or if) ecotourism changes destination areas and tourists themselves.
 
ANTH 3722-Primate Ecology
This course is an introduction to primates. Through lectures, readings, discussions, and observation projects, students will investigate the emergence of the order and explore the diversity of primates around the world. The course will address issues of ecological adaptation, social organization, and conservation, especially of the species most threatened by extinction, and it will illustrate how habituation projects make it possible to conduct effective field studies. The evolutionary basis ofthe special characteristics of primates will be discussed, as well as the question of what nonhuman primate behavior can tell us about ourselves.

ARHI 2555-Art and Ecology
This course investigates the work of artists, writers, and filmmakers who have dedicated themselves to creating solutions to specific environmental problems or whose works have broadened public concern for ecologically degraded environments. Students will participate in a wide variety of discourses about the personal, public, and ethical dimensions of current environmental issues.
 
BISC 1002-ECOLOGY: A HUMAN APPROACH
A course designed for non-majors. Ecological concepts and how they relate to critical contemporary issues: air and water pollution, radiation, energy, world hunger. Includes experiments, demonstrations and field trips. Lab required.

BISC 2561-Ecology
An introduction to the theories and applications of ecology including evolution, resources,population dynamics, life histories, competition, community structure, ecosystem processes, island biogeography, human impacts on ecosystems and conservation. Prerequisite(s): BISC 1404

BISC 3405-Plant Biology 
A survey of the major groups of plants and related organisms. Topics include physiology, morphology, ecology, taxonomy and systematics and human uses of plants. Prerequisite(s): BISC 1404

BISC 3643-Microbiology 
Detailed study of: microbial metabolism and physiology; microbial roles in maintaining earth's ecosystems and human health; global environmental change and effects on emerging infectious diseases, epidemiology and public health. Prerequisite(s): BISC 1404

BISC 4401-Tropical Ecology 
A survey of animal and plant communities in tropical, marine and terrestrial ecosystems. A field trip to a marine biological station in the Caribbean region is an integral part of thecourse. The required extra cost of this trip will be announced prior to registration. Prerequisite(s): BISC 1404

BISC 4601-Marine Biology 
Lecture will cover general biological oceanography,marine plantsandanimals, marine environments and marine resources, and pollution. Field exercises will include cruises on a research vessel, visits to marine research and educational centers, and trips to marine shore habitats. Lab fee. Prerequisite(s): BISC 1404

BISC 4642-Animal Behavior 
Introduction to animal behavior; evolution, genetics, physiology and ecology of behavior; sexual/mating/reproductive behavior; habitat selection, feeding behavior, anti-predator defenses, social behavior, human behavior. Prerequisite(s): BISC 1404

CHEM 1109-CHEMISTY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
An introduction to the principles of chemistry within the context of environmental and societal issues. These principles are introduced via sequential discussion of theories of matter and its transformation (chemical reactions), chemical sources of energy, and methods of testingand analysis. Specific applications, such as toxicity, pollution, and methods of remediation are discussed in conclusion. Lab required.
 
CISC 2500- INFORMATION AND DATA MANAGEMENT
This course will introduce the fundamentals of information storage, access and retrieval usingappropriate data structures and format. Students will also learn how toassess a problem inan application domain, extract its data requirements and then design and implement a simple database, using a tool such asAccess. Projects and case studies will be drawn from thenatural sciences, life sciences, social sciences, medical and health sciences, and/or business/commerce. Students will also learn to queryand manage a variety of diverse on-line databases (e.g., GenBank).

COMM 3085-Science Journalism (L)
Ata time when science and technology permeate debates on everything from climate change to stem cell research, to nuclear power to genetically modified foods many Americans lack sufficient understanding of these basic science and health concepts.  This course will explorefundamentalsin science and medicine reporting, emphasizing the essential research and story development skills needed bring complex medical, science and health issues to the general public.  It will explore the scientific   process, how to evaluate scientific and health information,ethical controversies, and what makes science and medical news.  Students will learn how to break, report, translate, and illuminate scientific information, forging journalism that helps build scientific literacy equal to contemporary challenges. (Prerequisite – COMM 2082or Instructor’s Permission)        

COMM 4705-Culture, Media and the Environment
A survey of issues involved with the depiction of nature in the media.

ECON 1100-Basic Macroeconomics
Investment, GDP, interest rates, the budget deficit, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, and exchange rates appear frequently in the media, but are often little understood. Macroeconomics studies these aggregates and their interconnections, and looks as well at the influence of the Federal Reserve and the federal government.

ECON 2140-STATISTICS
This course introduces students to descriptive statistics, probability theory, discrete and continuous probability distributions, sampling methods, sampling distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing.
 
ECON3430-Sustainable Business
This foundation course for the GSB-FCRH Sustainable Business minor covers the ethical, economic, and scientific principles needed to manage and promote enterprises that are both profitable but also socially and environmentally responsible. Using case studies, guest speakers and their own research students acquire the comprehensive perspective necessary to manage and promote social entrepreneurship within large and small companies and to work with NGOs, fair trade groups, private-public sector partnerships and micro-enterprises, etc. Sustainable means profitable,environmentally sound and enabling for small scale entreprenuers. Case studies range from Google’s East Coast Wind Power grid to carbon offset programs in the Amazon to mobile phone remittance based microfinance programs in Africa. This first course will draw on the knowledge of Fordham students and faculty as well guest speakers from the New York area to build a new sustainable business and development program at Fordham.

ECON 3385-Economics of Energy
A survey of the economic issues involved with energy, including alternative energy sources.
 
ECON 3850-ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies,from reducing air and water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone depleting gases. However, the environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike. Prerequisite: ECON 1200.

ENVS 1000-Introduction to Environmental Science
This course serves as and introduction to the multidisciplinary scientific study ofthe physical earth. Students will become familiar with the concepts that biologists, chemists, geologists and physicists use to describe the Earth¿s natural systems. The qualitative and quantitative concepts investigators use to describe and examine the Earth¿s systems will be introduced. Relationships and interactions between the Earth¿s atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere and biosphere will be discussed. The topic of climate change and the effect of human activities on the Earth will be addressed.

HIST 3629-Maritime Cities
A study of Maritime cities and their environments.

HIST 3772-Hudson River
Rivers are the central geographical markers for the growth of civilization. Examination of the formative role ofthe Hudson in American economic development and the shaping of cultural identity. The ways in which thehistory of Hudson mirrors our relationship with nature and is central to the emergence of the modern environmental movement will also be examined.

HIST 3990-North American Environmental History
The course will explore various aspectsof North American environmental history. 

HIST 3991-The Amerian Indians
This course examines American Indians from their own points of view, from those of Whites, and from the ways that Indians changed American culture and the environment. It is broadly chronological but mostly topical, covering the period from 13,000 years ago to after World War II through a series of issues and events.

HIST 3992-Capitalism
Political economy is the social science that treats the sources and methods of productionforsubsistence and wealth. It is the study of howpolitical systems conceive of and organizes economic life and of the ideas people hold as they set out to derive wealth from nature. Its founding authors are stillread today, although they tended to deny that ecology and economy could possibly come into conflict. Instead, they proposed mechanistic models in which the market resolved all contradictions. This seminar considers the various ways that capitalist societies have apportioned resources and conceived of nature, progress, and wealth. It is a topical historical survey intended to teach the origins, qualities and historical manifestations of this powerful social system. The course assumes no knowledge of economics and only a basic knowledge of American andEuropean history.
 
HIST 4780-History of Capitalism
Political economy is the social science that treats the sources and methods of production for subsistence and wealth. It is the study of how political systems conceive of andorganizes economic life and of the ideas people hold as they set out to derive wealth from nature. Its founding authors are still read today, although they tended to deny that ecology and economy could possibly come into conflict. Instead, they proposed mechanistic models in which the market resolved all contradictions. This seminar considers the various ways that capitalist societies have apportioned resources and conceived of nature, progress, and wealth. It is a topical historical survey intended to teachthe origins, qualities and historical manifestations of thispowerful social system. The course assumes no knowledge of economics and only a basic knowledge of American andEuropean history.

HIST 4990-History of Climate Change
Thecourse will explore various aspects of climate change and its perception over the course of history.
 
MATH 1203-APPLIED CALCULUS I
This is an elementary course in calculus intended primarily for nonscience majors. Topics include derivatives of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithm functions, curve sketching and optimization problems, the definite integral.
 
MATH 1206-CALCULUS I
Calculus for science and math majors. Functions, limits, continuity, Intermediate Value Theorem, the derivative and applications, antiderivatives, Riemann sums, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.

MLAL 4002-Animal Rights Literature & Film
This course takes up the issues of animal rights, animal rights advocacy, and, to a related extent, environmental ethics. We examine and discuss these issues through literature, film, speakers, and field trips.
 
NSCI 1020-Physical Science in Today's World
An introductory course for non-science majors. Topics includeheat engines, energy supply and consumption, nuclear fission and fusion, renewable energy resources, fossil fuels, and acid rain. Emphasis will be on basic physical principles as applied to environmental issues.Lab required. 

NSCI 1040-People and the Living Environment
A course designed for non-majors. Ecological concepts and how they relate to critical contemporary issues: air and water pollution, radiation, energy, world hunger. Includes experiments, demonstrations and field trips. Lab required.

NSCI 2010-Global Ecology 
An introduction to the principles of ecology, with emphasis on global environmental problems of the present day. The interaction of biologicalprinciples with social, political and economic systems. Selected topics include the ecology of global habitats, population biology, air and water pollution, waste disposal and environmental impacts. Prerequisite(s): NSCI 1030 or NSCI 1040 or NSCI 1051 or NSCI 1404
 
NSCI 2060-ENVIRONMENT: SCIENCE, LAW AND POLICY
Using problem-based investigations and case studies, students willexamine scientific, legal and policy aspects of selected topics. The course includes field trips to environmentally sensitive sites and guest speakers.

NSCI 4043-Bacteriology 
Study of structural and functional characteristics of bacteria. Topics will include cell structure, physiological pathways, microbial genetics, disease mechanisms and ecology. Laboratory experiments will acquaint students with techniques of isolation, culture, and identification of bacteria from soil, water, food, and air; bacterial genetics and ecology. Lab fee. Prerequisite(s): NSCI 1404, NSCI 1414, NSCI 1331 and NSCI 1332
 
PHIL 3109-ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS
This senior values seminar surveys major theories in environmental ethics dealing with our moralduties regarding nature: for example, environmental stewardship, sustainable development, environmental justice, ecological virtue ethics, animal rights, biocentrism, Leopold's land ethic, and ecological feminism. It hasnot only philosophical but also scientific, economic, political, and design dimensions as it deals with such topics as global warming, alternative energy, pollution control, suburban sprawl, deforestation, biodiversity loss, and the prospect of a sixth mass species extinction event threatening the future of human and nonhuman life as we know it.

PHIL 3712-Global Environment and Justice
This course is an introduction to environmental policy issues focusing on the largest scale global problems, such asdeforestation,loss of biodiversity and wilderness species, overuse of land, sea, and freshwater food sources, soil erosion and excessive waste sinkage, global warming and exhaustion of fossil fuels. Using an environmental accounting approach and highly accessible best-selling books, we will build a pictureof total humanuse of environmental 'capital,' and consider the implications of  likely increases on future generations and the developing world in particular. In research projects, students will explore possible ways towards sustainable use of the biosphere, in which the planetary 'endowment' of life-generating capacity is preserved in perpetuityin a way that is fair to all nations.

PHIL 3722-Native American Philosophy
This seminar-style course will explore the philosophical contributions of Native Americans (also known as American Indians, and best known by the names these diverse people havegiven themselves), including insights about how to preserve our biotic community and to live with one another amidst our American pluralism in ways that are spiritually satisfying.
 
PHIL3962-Sustainability & Process
This Service-Learning Designated course philosophically examines the complex interrelationships of human and natural environments in our age, with a focus on issuesconcerning "sustainability”. Texts willrange through the pragmatic and process philosophical traditions including figures like James, Dewey, Whitehead, Daly, and others. Students will form service connectionswith a varietyof local organizations with a sustainability focus.
 
PHYS 1203-ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS
An introductory course for non-science majors. Topics include heat engines, energy supply and consumption, nuclear fission and fusion, renewable energy resources, fossil fuels, andacid rain. Emphasis will be onbasic physical principles as appliedto environmental issues. Course requirements include several laboratory
experiments. The laboratory is designed to investigate various physical properties of the environment. Experiments will include water-testing and air quality measurements as wellas the rudiments of electronic circuitry and the investigation of radioactivity in the environment. Labrequired.

POSC 2507-Environmental Politics
This course introduces students to the history and evolution of environmentalismand environmental policy from a comparative political perspective. 

POSC 3131—Politics of Urban Health and Environment    
 The course will examine the intersection of urban life, individual and community health, and public policy. In so doing it will examine the evolution of urban public health problems, the urban environment, and the role and responsibility of society and the political system to respond to individual and community health issues in urban settings. A variety of concepts will be addressed including individual responsibility for health, the role of the community in promoting health, privacy, and the role of government and the market in dealing with individual and community health problems. Obesity, asthma, HIV/AIDS, national and global disparities in the delivery ofhealth care are some of the health issuesthat will be covered.

PSYC 2000-Statistics
This course covers descriptive statistics and (parametric and nonparametric) inferential statistics. It emphasizes mastery of statistical concepts and utilization of statistical software.

SOCI 3145-Environment, Techology and Society

SSCI 2606 – Social Science Statistics
This course is a basic introductionto descriptive and inferential statistics forthepurpose of introducing students to the logic of social science research (in particular, survey research). Students learn how to do statistical calculations manually as well as by using the statistical software (e.g., SPSS). In both instances, students will be taught how to read and interpret "numbers." Upon completion of this course, students should beable to think critically aboutdata, to select and use descriptive graphical and numerical summaries, to apply standard statistical inference procedures, and to draw conclusions from such analyses. Students will then be ready for more specialized statistics courses (such as applied regression analysis), for "research methods" courses in many fields of study, and for projects, reports, or jobs that require basic data analysis. Prerequisite: One introductory social science course.
 
THEO 4008-RELIGION AND ECOLOGY
A course to study the earth as a matter of ethical and religious concern. Starting with biblical texts and classical doctrines, students will analyze the resources of the Jewish/Christian traditions that value the natural world.

VART 3050-Designing the City
A creative and practical course in urban design, focusing on the relationship between people and the built environment.Although urban design is a visual discipline, its roots and purposes are interdisciplinary, combining high ideals with hard realism. Readings, walking tours, and research examine the historical roots of current urban design problems and practices. Seminar discussions highlight the goals: regenerative neighborhoods and lively publicplaces. Suburban sprawl and auto-centered development are contrasted with smart growth, sustainable communities, and new urbanism. Students use Mac-based CAD software to visualize great new publicplaces in New York -- practicing the imaginative art of the possible.

VART 2055-Environmental Design
This introductory design course exploresthe relationship between natural and artificial design systems.   Readings, field trips, illustrated lectures and seminar sessions outline the histories and forms of settlements and landscapes, design attitudes towards nature, and our increasing interests in green design strategies, sustainable urban development, environmental footprint reduction, renewable energy and conservation. Each student completes an individual research assignment, and contributes to a team design project. Intended for Visual Arts, Urban Studies, Environmental Policy and Science students.
 
VART 2085-Sustainable New York
A workshop in big city “greening”. Although intended for majors in visual arts, environmental policy, and/or urban studies, this course will interest anyone concerned about New York City’s future in an era of rising energy costs and environmental risk.  Walking tours; field trips; reading program and discussion; visits to buildings, parks, and construction sites; illustrated presentations; guest speakers from state and city agencies, NGOs, non-profits, and private sector innovators, will inform the course.  Several sessions will meet outside Fordham, for example at Solar One, located on the East River at 23rd Street, or the Science Barge in the Hudson River at 44th Street.  By term's end, each student will present an independent research or design project.

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