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Audio Readings in the French of England
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     The following readings are of two kinds: the first, Selections 1-5, are informal readings recorded at the annual Reading the French of England Aloud sessions at the Kalamazoo International Congress in 2012 and 3013. In these sessions, volunteers read and Professor Alice Colby-Hall, Emerita, Cornell University, gives both exemplary readings herself and commentary and phonological advice to the readers in the sessions. Some of this discussion is deliberately preserved in our recordings, as are the characteristics of a live recording. The second set of readings, Selection 6.1-4, consists of studio recordings graciously made and reviewed by Professor Colby-Hall at Fordham. We are very grateful to her for her vigorous participation in all aspects of our efforts to make the French of England audible.
British Library Egerton MS 3028 f. 64r “Seignurs, ore fetes pees, frank gent honoree! Gardez qe il n'i ert noise ne corouce ne mellé, Si orrez bone chançon…” (Lords, honored noblemen,  silence! See that there is no brawling or anger or  quarreling and you'll hear a fine song…)
In all cases, the text of each reading has been linked with the recording and will scroll past the listener as the recording is heard. For this format, as for much else, we are deeply indebted to Matthew Schottenfeld, Television Production Manager at Fordham, whose patience, professionalism and creativity in working with us to make these recordings available has been a constant source of inspiration.

We also thank Sarah O’Brien, Graduate Assistant to Jocelyn Wogan-Browne for her work on the project. We thank Professor Ian Short, Emeritus, Birkbeck College, London, for his permission to use extracts from his editions of the Le Voyage de saint Brendan and Gaimar’s Estoire des Engleis as detailed below, and the Editorial Committee of the British Rencesvals Society for their permission to quote from Le Jeu d’Adam, ed. and tr. Wolfgang van Emden, 2nd edition, British Rencesvals Publications 1, Edinburgh, 1999.
                                                                       Thelma Fenster and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne.

British Library Egerton MS 3028 f. 64r
“Seignurs, ore fetes pees, frank gent honoree!

Gardez qe il n'i ert noise ne corouce ne mellé,

Si orrez bone chançon…” (Lords, honored noblemen,

silence! See that there is no brawling or anger or

quarreling and you'll hear a fine song
…)
Selections

1.Benedeit, Le Voyage de saint Brendan, c. 1118-21, vv. 1729-84, read by Alice Colby-Hall, Emerita, Cornell University (with preliminary discussion by Professor Colby-Hall and commentary after the reading by Professor Colby-Hall). For a student edition, see Ian Short, and Brian Merrilees†, eds. The Anglo-Norman Voyage of St Brendan (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1979), and for a translation, see W. R. Barron and Glyn S. Burgess, eds., The Voyage of Saint Brendan: Representative Versions of the Legend in English Translation (Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 2002), or Ian Short with Dominique Tixhon, Benedeit: le Voyage de saint Brandan. Texte, traduction et illustrations, 1999. Web-site publication, Coppet, Switzerland: http://saintbrendan.d-t-x.com/. For an edition with still fuller notes and a translation into modern French see Le voyage de Saint Brendan: édition bilingue / Benedeit; text, traduction, présentation et notes par Ian Short et Brian Merrilees† (Paris: H. Champion, 2006).
Oxford, Bodleian Library, Ashmole MS 1511,
fol. 86v:  whale mistaken for an island



2.
Geffrei Gaimar, L’Estoire des engleis, 1136x1150, vv. 5975-6110, read by Walter Scott, University of Wisconsin. For edition and translation, see Ian Short, ed. and tr., Geffrei Gaimar, Estoire des Engleis/History of the English (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).





British Library, Royal MS 13 A xxi, fol. 40r
Heptarchy diagram for Anglo-Saxon England in
an early s. xiv manuscript containing Gaimar’s Romanz de Estoire
.




3. Anon, Le Jeu d’Adam, 1146x72, vv.205-76, read by Thelma Fenster, Emerita, Fordham University, and Curtis Jirsa, Washington and Lee University (with preliminary discussion by the readers). For a translation, see Wolfgang van Emden, ed. and tr., Le Jeu d’Adam, British Rencesvals Publications 1, 2nd ed. (Edinburgh: Société Rencesvals British Branch, 1999).



British Library, Royal MS 2 B vii, Queen Mary Psalter, fol. 3v





4.
Herman de Valenciennes, Li Romanz de Dieu et de sa mere, 1189-95, vv. 398-466, read by Alice Colby-Hall, Emerita, Cornell University. The equivalent line numbers in the edition by Ina Spiele, Li Romanz de Dieu et de sa Mere d’Herman de Valenciennes (Leiden: Presses universitaires, 1975) are vv. 398-466. The edition used here is from Vernacular Literary Theory and Practices: Texts and Translations in the French of England, ed. J. Wogan-Browne, T. Fenster and D. Russell, forthcoming, Boydell and Brewer, where the text is also translated.





British Library, Harley MS 222, fol. 44r From Herman’s
Bible
or Romanz de dieu et de sa mere.




5. Nicole Bozon, Le Char d’Orgueil, c. 1320, vv. 1-20, 257-283, read by Laurie Postlewate, Barnard College (with commentary by Professor Colby-Hall). The poem is edited in Johan Vising, Deux Poèmes de Nicholas Bozon: Le Char d’orgueil, La Lettre de l’empereur Orgueil (Göteborg: Elanders boktryckeri aktiebolag, 1919): a translation will appear in the volume on Bozon that Professor Postlewate is preparing for FRETS, the French of England in Translation series.



British Library, Harley MS 4372, fol. 79v.
An elite late medieval chariot: a king travelling in procession
 


6. Readings by Professor Alice Colby-Hall

   
     (i) Clemence of Barking, La Vie de sainte Catherine, vv. 1-50. For text and translation, see J. Wogan-Browne and G. S. Burgess, Virgin Lives and Holy Deaths: Two Exemplary Biographies for Anglo-Norman Women (London: Dent, Everyman, 1996).
 

British Library,
Add MS 70513, fol. 246r,
"Ici comence la vie sainte Katerine"



     (ii) Geffrei Gaimar, L’Estoire des engleis, vv. 3443-56, 2315-38. Text and translation from Vernacular Literary Theory and Practices: Texts and Translations in the French of England, ed. J. Wogan-Browne, T. Fenster and D. Russell, forthcoming, Boydell and Brewer see Ian Short, ed. and trs. Geffrei Gaimar Estoire des Engleis (History of the English) (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).







British Library, Cotton MS Claudius D VI, f. 10v

Descent from ‘King Alfred the Wise'



     (iii) Denis Piramus, La Vie de saint Edmond le martyre, vv. 1-56. Text and translation from Vernacular Literary Theory and Practices : Texts and Translations in the French of England, ed. J. Wogan-Browne, T. Fenster and D. Russell, forthcoming, Boydell and Brewer.  For the whole text, see Hilding Kjellman, ed., La Vie seint Edmund le Rei, poème anglo-normand du XIIe siècle (Göteborg: Elanders Boktryckeri Aktiebolag, 1935). A new edition by D.W. Russell for ANTS is forthcoming.






British Library Royal MS 2 B VI, f. 10r.
The Ascension and the martyrdom of St Edmund






     (iv) A Nun of Barking, La Vie d'Édouard le Confesseur: poème anglo-normand du XIIe siècle vv. 5296-5335. Text and translation from Vernacular Literary Theory and Practices: Texts and Translations in the French of England, ed. J. Wogan-Browne, T. Fenster and D. Russell, forthcoming, Boydell and Brewer. For the whole life, see Östen Södergård, ed. La Vie d'Édouard le Confesseur: poème anglo-normand du XIIe siècle (Uppsala: Almqvist & Wiksell, 1948).







British Library Egerton MS 745, f. 91r
(continental prose version of the Barking Life of St Edward)

 
 
 
 

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