Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


French Philosophies - Haddad

French Philosophies of Education (PHIL 6215)
Fordham University, Spring 2012
 
Professor:                  Samir Haddad
E-mail:                        sahaddad@fordham.edu
Class Times:              Friday, 1:00-3:00, in the Collins Hall conference room.
 
Description: In this course we will read texts by Pierre Bourdieu and Jean-Claude Passeron, Jacques Derrida, Michèle Le Dœuff, and Jacques Rancière, examining issues in the philosophy of education. The aim of the course is threefold – to gain a comprehensive understanding of the educational milieu in which post-WWII French philosophers studied and taught, to explore philosophical questions related to the learning and teaching of philosophy, and to reflect on our own practices as students and teachers. Particular attention will also be paid to the political dimensions of these theories of education.
 
Texts: Available at the Fordham University Bookstore.
Pierre Bourdieu and Jean-Claude Passeron, The Inheritors: French Students and their Relation to Culture
Michèle Le Dœuff, The Philosophical Imaginary
Jacques Rancière, The Ignorant Schoolmaster: Five Lessons in Intellectual Emancipation
All other assigned readings are available on Blackboard.
 
Proposed Schedule (subject to modification):
 
Jan 20              Introduction and mechanics
                       
27                    “Institutions,” from Kritzman (ed.), The Columbia History of Twentieth Century French Thought
“Chronology” and “Glossary,” from Albanese and Guiney (eds.), French Education: Fifty Years Later, YFS 113
Schrift, “Understanding French Academic Culture,” from Twentieth Century French Philosophy
Schrift, “The Effects of the Agrégation de Philosophie on Twentieth Century French Philosophy,” Journal of the History of Philosophy, 46.3
 
Feb 3               Bourdieu and Passeron, Prefatory Note, Chapters 1-3, and Conclusion, from The Inheritors
Bourdieu and Passeron, “The Literate Tradition and Social Conservation,” from Reproduction in Education, Society, and Culture                    
 
10                    Bourdieu, Preface to the English edition, “Types of Capital and Forms of Power,” and Appendices 2.1 and 2.2, from Homo Academicus
 
17                    Derrida, “Where a Teaching Body Begins and How it Ends” and “The Age of Hegel,” from Who’s Afraid of Philosophy?
 
 
24                    Derrida, “Vacant Chair: Censorship, Mastery, Magisteriality” and “Mochlos, or The Conflict of the Faculties,” from Eyes of the University
Kant, from “The Conflict of the Faculties”
 
Mar 2              Derrida, “The Principle of Reason: The University in the Eyes of its Pupils,” from Eyes of the University
Derrida, “The University without Condition,” from Without Alibi    
 
9                      Le Dœuff, “Preface: The Shameful Face of Philosophy” and “Red Ink in the Margin,” from The Philosophical Imaginary
                        Descartes, from Discourse on the Method and Principles of Philosophy
 
16                    No class (Spring break)
                   
23                    Le Dœuff, “Long Hair, Short Ideas,” from The Philosophical Imaginary
Le Dœuff, “Ants and Women, or Philosophy without Borders,” from Griffiths (ed.), Contemporary French Philosophy
 
30                    Le Dœuff, from Hipparchia’s Choice
 
Apr 6               No class (Easter)
 
13                    Rancière, Chapters 1-3, from The Ignorant Schoolmaster
 
20                    Rancière, Chapters 4-5, from The Ignorant Schoolmaster
 
27                    Rancière, from Disagreement
 
May 4              Student Presentations
 
11                    Student Presentations
 
 

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