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Course Bulletin









Course Bulletin

Overview
All majors in physics should have four years of secondary school mathematics, including trigonometry and courses in secondary school physics and chemistry. Because of the sequential nature of physics courses, it is important to arrange a program at the earliest possible date. Incoming freshmen are advised to indicate an interest in physics on their admission forms and to contact the physics department before the beginning of their first semester.


Core Curriculum:  Physics offers PHYS 1201-1207, which count as the physical science course to fulfill the natural science core requirement. In addition, the department offers PHYS 4208, which fulfills the Senior Value Seminar core requirement.


Program Requirements

Physics Major
(HEGIS Code 1902) Program Code (B.S.) 06122

The major in physics is available at Fordham College at Rose Hill. Students in Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies may major in physics only if their schedules are sufficiently flexible to permit them to take day courses on the Rose Hill campus.

All students planning to major in physics (including those enrolled in the 3-2 Cooperative Program in Engineering) are required to take the following courses: PHYS 1601, PHYS 1602, PHYS 1511, PHYS 1512, MATH 1206, MATH 1207 freshman year; PHYS 2001, PHYS 2305, PHYS 3100, CHEM 1321-1322 and CHEM 1331-1332, MATH 2004, sophomore year; PHYS 2002, PHYS 2011, PHYS 3011, PHYS 3101, PHYS 3102, PHYS 3211, PHYS 3401, PHYS 4005 junior year.

All seniors except those in the 3-2 Cooperative Program in Engineering are required to take at least two physics electives.


ENGINEERING PHYSICS MAJOR
(HEGIS Code 0919) Program Code 27205

The major in engineering physics is available at Fordham College at Rose Hill. Students in Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies may major in engineering physics only if their schedules are sufficiently flexible to permit them to take day courses on the Rose Hill campus.

All students in the major are required to take the following courses:
PHYS 1601, PHYS 1602, PHYS 1511, PHYS 1512, MATH 1206, MATH 1207 freshman year; PHYS 2305, MATH 2004, PHYS 2001, PHYS 2011 (or PHYS 3011), PHYS 3100 and a two-semester introductory sequence in either biology or chemistry sophomore year; PHYS 2002, PHYS 3101, PHYS 3401, and two related engineering electives junior year and two related engineering electives senior year.


3-2 COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN ENGINEERING
Students enrolled in the 3-2 Cooperative Program in Engineering complete the requirements for the physics degree through the junior year. They then transfer to an engineering program and complete an additional two years. They earn a double bachelor's degree in physics and engineering.

PHYSICS MINOR
The minor in physics is available at Fordham College at Rose Hill. Students in Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies may minor in physics only if their schedules are sufficiently flexible to permit them to take day courses on the Rose Hill campus.

The requirements are PHYS 1601-1602, PHYS 1511-1512, PHYS 2001-2002, PHYS 2305 and two physics electives (2000 level or higher).

Courses Planned for Fall 2012 - Spring 2013
Note: All courses listed below are offered at Rose Hill.

PHYS 1201-Introductory Astronomy
PHYS 1203-Environmental Physics

PHYS 1206-Physics of Everday Life
PHYS 1207-Physics of Light and Color

PHYS 1501-General Physics I
PHYS 1502-General Physics II
PHYS 1511-Physics I Lab
PHYS 1512-Physics II Lab
PHYS 1601-Introductory Physics I
PHYS 1602-Introductory Physics II
PHYS 1701-Physics I
PHYS 1702-Physics II
PHYS 2001-Theoretical Mechanics
PHYS 2002-Electricity and Magnetism
PHYS 2011-Intermediate Laboratory
PHYS 2101-Statics
PHYS 2102-Mechanics of Materials
PHYS 2111-Intro to Inventions and Patents
PHYS 2305-Introduction to Modern Physics
PHYS 3011-Advanced Laboratory
PHYS 3101-Mathematical Methods in Physics I
PHYS 3102-Mathematical Methods in Physics II
PHYS 3103-Mathematical Methods in Physics III
PHYS 3201-Fluid Mechanics
PHYS 3211-Computational Physics and Programming I
PHYS 3301-Solid State Physics
PHYS 3311-Electronics Instrumentation
PHYS 3301-Solid State Physics
PHYS 3401-Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics
PHYS 3601-Optics
PHYS 3602- Engineering Materials
PHYS 4001-4002-Undergraduate Research I-II
PHYS 4003-Theoretical Physics I
PHYS 4004-Theoretical Physics II
PHYS 4005-Quantum Mechanics I
PHYS 4006-Quantum Mechanics II
PHYS 4007-Laser Theory and Design
PHYS 4008-Medical Physics
PHYS 4009-Advanced Material Physics
PHYS 4010-Introduction to Electrical Engineering
PHYS 4011-Particle Physics

Course Descriptions
Note: These courses are taught only on the Rose Hill campus.

PHYS 1201 - INTRODUCTORY ASTRONOMY (3 credits)

Includes discussion of the solar system, stars, galaxies and cosmology. Methods of making observations. An investigation of physical phenomena including lenses, spectroscopy and refraction. Direct observation through the telescope of celestial objects depending on their position and weather conditions. Astrophotography and film development is also available. The lab is intended for the student with little mathematical background. (Freshmen and sophomores only). (No lab fee).

PHYS 1203 - ENVIRONMENTAL PHYSICS (3 credits)

An introductory course for non-science majors. Topics include heat engines, energy supply and consumption, nuclear fission and fusion, renewable energy resources, fossil fuels, and acid rain. Emphasis will be on basic physical principles as applied to environmental issues. Course requirements include several laboratory experiments. The laboratory is designed to investigate various physical properties of the environment. Experiments will include water-testing and air quality measurements as well as the rudiments of electronic circuitry and the investigation of radioactivity in the environment. (Freshmen and sophomores only). (No lab fee).

PHYS 1206 - PHYSICS OF EVERYDAY LIFE (3 credits)

An introductory course for non-science majors. Topics include physical phenomena that one comes across in everyday life. Physical principles will be explained and numerous examples (many from sports) will be presented. There will be several laboratory experiments that will give students a better understanding of several physical quantities. The experiments will illustrate aspects of mechanics, wave motion, heat and electricity and magnetism. (Freshmen and sophomores only). (No lab fee).

PHYS 1207 - PHYSICS OF LIGHT AND COLOR (3 credits)

An introductory course for non-science majors. Topics include laser light and how lasers influence our lives, with examples from telecommunications, compact disk players, laser surgery and holograms. An investigation of the human eye and the mechanism of color vision. Course requirements include several laboratory experiments. The laboratory is designed to investigate various physical properties of laser light and color. (Freshmen and sophomores only). (No lab fee).

PHYS 1501 - GENERAL PHYSICS I (3 credits)

An introductory course in physics on the non-calculus level. A study of the basic laws of classical and modern physics, including mechanics, heat, sound, electricity and magnetism.

PHYS 1502 - GENERAL PHYSICS II (3 credits)

Continuation of PY 1501.

PHYS 1511 - PHYSICS I LABORATORY (1 credits)

Measurements in mechanics, heat, waves, electricity and magnetism, optics and atomic and nuclear physics. Lab fee.

PHYS 1512 - PHYSICS II LABORATORY (1 credits)

Continuation of PY 1511. Lab fee.

PHYS 1601 - INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS I (4 credits)

Introductory course for physics majors. A study of mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics and atomic physics.

PHYS 1602 - INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICS II (4 credits)

Continuation of PY 1601.

PHYS 1701 - PHYSICS I (3 credits)

Introductory course for students who have completed one year of college calculus (MT 1206-1207 or equivalent). A study of mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics and atomic physics.

PHYS 1702 - PHYSICS II (3 credits)

Continuation of PY 1701.

PHYS 2001 - THEORETICAL MECHANICS (4 credits)

An introduction to classical mechanics including kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Includes a discussion of D'Alembert's principle, Lagrange's equations and Hamilton's principle.

PHYS 2002 - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (4 credits)

Electrostatics, dielectric media, direct current circuits, magnetism and magnetic media, transients and alternating currents, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's equations, and electromagnetic waves.

PHYS 2011 - INTERMEDIATE LABORATORY (2 credits)

Experiments in electricity and magnetism, modern physics, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and thermodynamics. Lab fee.

PHYS 2101 - STATICS (4 credits)

The following topics will be covered: Force System Resultants, Equilibrium of a Rigid Body, Structural Analysis, Internal Forces, Friction, Center of Gravity Centroid, Moments of Inertia, Virtual Work.

PHYS 2102 - STRENGTH OF MATERIALS (4 credits)

An introduction to the mechanical properties of materials including their response to: stress, strain, torsion, bending, and shear.

PHYS 2111 - INTRODUCTION TO INVENTIONS AND PATENTS (1 credits)

Introduction to the creative process that drives innovation and invention. Includes discussions on creative development of ideas, formalizing patent applications, commercialization and technology transfer.

PHYS 2305 - INTRODUCTION TO MODERN PHYSICS (4 credits)

A survey course of the more important areas of modern physics. Topics include special theory of relativity, introduction to quantum mechanics, atomic physics, molecules and solids, nuclear structure and elementary nuclear physics applications and particle physics.

PHYS 3011 - ADVANCED LABORATORY I (2 credits)

Measurements in electronics, diodes, transistors, and operational amplifiers. Lab fee.

PHYS 3101 - MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN PHYSICS I (4 credits)

Matrices and determinants, series expansion, complex numbers and functions, Fourier series, ordinary differential equations, partial differential equations, and special functions of physics, theory of special relativity.

PHYS 3102 - MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN PHYSICS II (4 credits)

Continuation of PY 3101.

PHYS 3103 - MATHEMATICAL METHODS IN PHYSICS III (4 credits)

Continuation of PY 3102.


PHYS 3201 - FLUID MECHANICS (4 credits)

This course introduces the fundamentals of fluid statics, dimensional analysis and modeling, viscous flow in pipes, channel flows, laminar flow, transition, turbulence; flow past an object, wake, separation, vortices, drag; convection, conduction, transition from periodic to chaotic behavior, compressible flow; transition to turbulence.

PHYS 3211 - COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS AND PROGRAMMING I (2 credits)

An introductory course in the use of computers to numerically solve problems in physics. Topics include numerical solution of non-linear equations, interpolation and extrapolation, numerical differentiation and integration. No prior knowledge of computer language is required.

PHYS 3301 - SOLID STATE PHYSICS (4 credits)

An introduction to the elastic, thermal, electromagnetic, and optical properties of solids; energy bands, semiconductors, superconductors, surface and defect structures and device applications.

PHYS 3401 - THERMODYNAMICS AND STATISTICAL PHYSICS (4 credits)

Fundamental principles, first and second laws, thermodynamic functions; a discussion of the kinetic theory of gases and introductory statistical mechanics.

PHYS 3601 - OPTICS (4 credits)

Wave propagation, interference, diffraction, and polarization; electromagnetic theory of light.

PHYS 4001-2 - UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH I-II (4 credits)

Participation of the undergraduate in research under the direction of one of the faculty.

PHYS 4002 - UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH II (4 credits)

Participation of the undergraduate in research under the direction of one of the faculty.

PHYS 4003 - THEORETICAL PHYSICS I (4 credits)

Lagrange's equations, variational principles, Hamilton's equations, canonical transformations, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, rigid body motion, small oscillations, central forces and Kepler's planetary motion.

PHYS 4004 - THEORETICAL PHYSICS II (4 credits)

Electrostatics, boundary value problems, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, wave equation, wave guides.

PHYS 4005 - QUANTUM MECHANICS I (4 credits)

Foundations of quantum mechanics, Schrdinger equation, Hermitian operators, solution of the Schrdinger equation, harmonic oscillator, hydrogen atom, angular momentum operators, variational method, perturbation theory.

PHYS 4006 - QUANTUM MECHANICS II (4 credits)

General formalism and representation theory, scattering theory, rotational operators, methods of approximation, identical particles and spin.

PHYS 4007 - LASER THEORY AND DESIGN (4 credits)

An introduction to the theory of lasers; treatment of the interaction of radiation with atoms and ions, energy levels, radiative and nonradiative transitions in molecules and semiconductors. Quantum well lasers, Q- switching, mode locking, optical resonators, pumping processes, rate equations and laser tuning. Design considerations for GaAlAs semiconductor, solid-state, dye, gas, chemical, free-electron and x-ray lasers.

PHYS 4008 - MEDICAL PHYSICS (4 credits)

Topics include biomechanics, biofluid mechanics, physics of the senses, tissue damage, radiation: dose and exposure, ultrasound, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computerized axial Tomography (CT), Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). Diagnostic equipment and techniques will be discussed throughout the course.

PHYS 4009 - ADVANCED MATERIAL PHYSICS (4 credits)

This course covers a range of modern and hot scientific areas including polymers, liquid crystals, ordered organic and light emitting materials. Some of these materials are widely used in application. Others are aggressively finding their place in the market. Structure properties and methods of characterization will be described and discussed.

PHYS 4011 - PARTICLE PHYSICS (4 credits)

An introduction to present-day ideas in particle physics. Emphasis during the first part of the course will be on the current Standard Model of particle physics, studying the basic interactions of fundamental particles and how they form the universe around us. Additionally, a variety of topics relevant to beyond the Standard Model physics will be addressed, including possibly some of the following topics: grand unified theories, quantum gravity, extra dimensions, and possibly string theory.

PHYS 4208 - GOD AND THE NEW PHYSICS (4 credits)

Science and religion represent two great systems of human thought. For most people, religion is the predominant influence over the conduct of their affairs. When science impinges on their lives, it does so not at the intellectual level, but practically through technology. This course is an attempt to bring forth the theories of the origin of the universe ("creation") of Newton, Einstein and most recently Stephen Hawking, and to compare these to various religious explanations from Genesis to the creation stories of Islam, Hindu and other world religions as well as a number if Native American creation myths.

PHYS 4999 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (4 credits)

Independent research and reading with supervision from a faculty member.

 


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