Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 



Lab Members



GRADUATE STUDENTS


Audra Noble Audra Noble, M.A.
My dissertation research explores the role of stages of change in a psychiatric sample. Stage of change is a transtheoretical model that speaks to a person's readiness to change maladaptive behavior. Specifically, I am investigating the relationships between stage of change, psychiatric distress and treatment adherence on a women's inpatient unit. As a researcher, I am interested in why treatment is effective for some clients and not for others, and how best to match treatment to individual's unique readiness level to increase the effectiveness of interventions.
Heather Schatten Heather Schatten, M.A.
Heather is a fourth-year graduate student in the clinical program. Her research interests include risk factors for and the relationship between indirect and direct self-harm, and neuropsychological functioning among individuals who engage in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Specifically, she is investigating the roles of interpersonal stressors and decision-making in NSSI. Heather is also a part of the lab's intervention study, Treatment for Self-Injurious Behaviors (T-SIB).
Blair Morris Blair Morris, M.A.
Blair is a third-year graduate student in the clinical program. Her main interest is in treatment outcome research and she is currently part of the lab's research team working on a treatment study for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Her other interests include eating disorders, risk for and prevention of suicidal behaviors, complex trauma, and understanding the relationship of borderline personality disorder traits and suicidal and self-injurious behaviors. Her masters research focuses on the relationships between emotion dysregulation, distress tolerance, and pain sensitivity in individuals with and without a history of NSSI. Clinically, Blair has experience with empirically-supported treatments including cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and cognitive behavioral therapy-enhanced for the treatment of eating disorders (CBT-E). Blair graduated with a B.A. from Columbia University.
  Chris Kelly, M.A.
I study depressive disorders and how individual differences in brain function and behavior contribute to episodic relapse and interfere with treatment response. More specifically, I am interested in understanding how anhedonia (the loss of interest or pleasure in formerly rewarding activities) relates to depression chronicity. My research focuses on using laboratory-based measures--e.g., behavioral assessment and psychophysiology--to objectively assess deficits in the capacity to process reward and experience emotions.

My current project is designed to examine the influence of anhedonia (as measured by the Probabilistic Reward Task developed by Dr. Pizzagalli at Harvard) on the experience of emotion (as measured by a startle task) in depressed, anxious, and healthy individuals.

  Abigail Wren
Abigail is a second year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology program. Her current research focuses on risk and protective factors for non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) as well as the influence of early life trauma exposure on NSSI. Abigail is also part of the treatment team for T-SIB, a treatment intervention for NSSI.
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Patrick Wester, FCRH ’12
Honors Thesis: Risk factors associated with non-suicidal self-injury in a LGB sample
Awarded the Fordham College Undergraduate Research Grant, Spring 2012
Margaux Bruzzese, FCRH ‘12
Honors Thesis: Risk Factors for Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in Adolescents
Awarded the Fordham College Undergraduate Research Grant, Fall 2011
Vincent Corcoran, FRCH ‘13
Awarded the Fordham Undergraduate Research Assistantship Grant, Fall 2011
Caitlin Nosal, FCRH ‘13
Hannah Wertz, FCLS ‘12
Sarah Dorman, FCRH ‘13
Lauren T. Perniciaro, FCRH ‘13
Caitlen Schroen, FCRH ‘13
Dan Cutler, FCRH ‘15


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