Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 
American Studies


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Matthew N. Weinshenker









Matthew N. Weinshenker, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Sociology (at Rose Hill)
Associate Chair for Graduate Studies

B.A., Yale; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago, 2006

Office: Dealy Hall 402B
441 E. Fordham Road
Bronx, NY 10458-9993
Phone: (718) 817-0724
Fax: (718) 817-3846
Email: weinshenker@fordham.edu


Background

Research Interests
Fatherhood; family; work-family issues; gender; masculinity; life course; children and youth; quantitative methodology.

Current Research
Professor Weinshenker is currently involved in two research projects.  First, a large and growing fraction of the US workforce is employed during "non-standard" hours (evening, night, and rotating shifts).  Weinshenker is examining families in which at least one parent works a non-standard schedule in order to understand (a) the impact on fathers' parenting, and (b) whether the negative effects of such schedules are accentuated in cohabiting and single-parent family structures. He is also engaged in an effort to describe the tremendous diversity in contemporary fatherhood practices by classifying fathers based on the patterns of specific activities they share with their children.  More information about this project is available here.



Publications
Articles

Weinshenker, Matthew. Forthcoming. "The effect of fatherhood on employment hours: variation by birth timing, marriage and coresidence." Journal of Family Issues.

Christensen, Kathleen, Matthew Weinshenker and Blake Sisk, 2010. “Workplace flexibility for federal civilian employees.” In Workplace Flexibility: Realigning 20th Century Jobs to 21st Century Workers, edited by K. Christensen and B. Schneider, pp. 274-308. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY.

Heuveline, Patrick, and Matthew N. Weinshenker, 2008. "The International Child Poverty Gap: Does Demography Matter?" Demography 45:173-191.

Weinshenker, Matthew N., 2006.  “Adolescents’ Expectations about Mothers’ Employment: Life Course Patterns and Parental Influence.” Sex Roles 54:845-57.

Weinshenker, Matthew N., 2005.  “Imagining Family Roles: Parental Influence on the Expectations of Adolescents in Dual-Earner Families.” In Being Together, Working Apart: Dual-Career Families and the Work-Life Balance, edited by B. Schneider and L.J. Waite, pp. 365-388. Cambridge University Press, New York.


Courses Taught
Undergraduate
Methods of Social Research I and II, Contemporary Family Issues, Diversity in American Families, Sociology Focus: Transition to Adulthood, Coming of Age, Urban Research Methods, 

Graduate
Graduate Statistics I and II, Demography of Families and Households

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