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Urban Studies 2012-2013 Electives









ELECTIVES
Note: Following each course are codes indicating where the course has been taught. R stands for Fordham College at Rose Hill, L for Fordham College at Lincoln Center, ER for Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies at Rose Hill, EL for Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies at Lincoln Center, and EW for Fordham School of Professional and Continuing Studies at Westchester.

Course descriptions can be found in alphabetical order at the end of the document.

Introduction to Urban Studies
HIST 1950 Understanding Historical Change: Urban Perspective (L)
POSC 2102 Intro to Urban Politics (R)
SOCI 3602 Urban Sociology (R, L)
VART 1101 Urbanism (R, L, EL)

Research Methods
CISC 2500 Information and Data Management (L)
SOCI 2606 Social Science Statistics (L)
SOCI 2650 Basic Research Methods (L)
SOCI 2690 Urban Research Methods (R)
SOCI 2850 Methods of Social Research I (R)
SOCI 2851 Methods of Social Research II (R)

Urban History
HIST 3102 Worker in American Life (R)
HIST 3619 World’s Fairs (L)
HIST 3624 European Cities (L)
HIST 3626 Social History of Architecture (L)
HIST 3629 Maritime Cities (L)
HIST 3831 Rise of the American Suburb 
HIST 3922 East Asian Cities (L)
HIST 3940 The African City (R)


The City in Literature, Music, Film & the Media
AFAM 3134 From Rock and Roll to Hip Hop (R)
AFAM 4896 Feeling the Funk (R)
COLI 3450 The City in Literature (L)
COMM 2000 Theories of Media, Culture and Society (R, L)
COMM 2603 Media and the Arts (R)
COMM 3571 Popular Music as Communication (R, L)
COMM 3601 Class, Taste, and Mass Culture (R, L)
COMM 4603 Media and Popular Culture (R, L)
ENGL 3609 Writing and the City (R)
ENGL 3440 Victorian Cosmopolitanisms (L) 
ENGL 3629-20th C. African-American Literature (R)
ENGL 3652 New Wave Immigrant Fiction (L)
MUSC 2014 Jazz, A History in Sound (R)
SOCI 2925 Media, Crime, Sex, and Violence (R)
VART 2003 Intro to Digital Graphic Tools (R)
VART 3267 Film and the City (L)

Urban Anthropology, Sociology and Social Work
 
ANTH 2620 Anthropology of Cities (R)
ANTH 3343 Ghettos and Gated Communities (R)
ANTH 3346 Drugs, Culture, and Society (L)
ANTH 3615 Urban Anthropology (L)
PSYC 3340 Urban Psychology (L)
SOCI 2600 Intro to Social Work & Welfare (R, EW)
SOCI 2610 Urban Community Development (R)
SOCI 2960 Popular Culture (R, EL)
SOCI 3160 The Modern City (R, L)
SOCI 3603 Urban America (R)
SOCI 4902 Internship Seminar: Community Organizations (R)
SOCI 4961 Urban Issues & Policies (R)
SOCI 4970 Community Service/Social Action (R)

Urban Immigration, Race, Ethnicity & Class Relations

AFAM 3036 Global Black Youth Cultures (R, L)
AFAM 3115-Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X (R, L, EL)
AFAM 3130 Racial and Ethnic Conflict (R)
ANTH 3342 Race in the Americas (R)
ANTH 3340 Anthropological Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity (L)
ECON 3570 Labor Market and Diversity (R)
HIST 3806 US Immigration/Ethnicity (R)
POSC 2320 Politics of Immigration (L)
POSC 3202 Civil Rights (L)
SOCI 2410 Inequality: Class, Race, Ethnicity (R)
SOCI 2420 Social Problems of Race and Ethnicity (R)
SOCI 2703 Social Deviance (R, L)
SOCI 3000 Latino Images in Media (L)
SOCI 3017 Inequality in America (R, L, ER, EL)
SOCI 3020 Identities/Inequalities in American Society (R)
SOCI 3136 Causes and Consequences of Inequality (R)
SOCI 3140 Old and New Minorities in the U.S (R)
SOCI 3404-Gender and Migration (R)
SOCI 3405-Gender, Race, Class (R, L)
SOCI 3406 Race/Social Construct (R)
SOCI 3408 Diversity in American Society (L, EW)
SOCI 3427 Hispanics in the USA (W)
SOCI 3430 Latinos and Public Policy(R)
SOCI 3670 Hispanic Women (L)
SOCI 3675 Latinas: Immigration/Inequality (R)
SOCI 4960 Contemporary Issues in U.S. Immigration (R)

Urban Economics, Politics & Globalization

ANTH 3353 Anthropology of Globalization (R)
ANTH 3354 Race, Identity and Globalization (R)
ECON 3240 World Poverty (R)
ECON 3244 International Economic Policy (R, L)
ECON 3430 Sustainable Business (R)
ECON 3971 Urban Economics (L)
HUAF 4001 Humanitarian Action (L)
POSC 2507 Environmental Politics (R)
POSC 3109 Political Economy of Poverty (R, L)
POSC 3140 Politics and Economic Globalization (R, L, EL, EW)
POSC 3307 Environmental Politics (R)
POSC 3507 International Human Rights (L)
POSC 3610 Political Economy of Development (R)
POSC 4454 Seminar: Global Justice (R)
POSC 4610 Seminar: Globalization (L)
SOCI 3043 Global Inequalities (L)
SOCI 3148 Population and Economic Development Issues (R)
SOCI 3410 Migration and Globalization (R)
SOCI 3415 Development and Globalization (R)
SOCI 3601 Urban Poverty (L)

The Built Environment (Architecture, Urban Planning, Ecology & Sustainable Cities) 

ARHI 2232 Islamic Cities (L)
ARHI 2460 Architecture: 1300-1750 (R)
ARHI 2540 Modern Architecture (R, EL)
ARHI 3100 Museum Methods (L)
ARHI 3315-The City of Rome (L)
ARHI 3351-Issues in Architecture (R)
ARHI 3540 Contemporary Architecture (L)
ECON 3850 Environmental Economics (R)
ENVP 3070 Green Architecture (R, L)
HIST 3990 North American Environmental History (R)
NSCI 1040 People and the Living Environment (L, EL)
PHIL 3109 Environmental Ethics (R, L)
POSC 3130 Politics of Urban Planning & Development (R)
URST 3070 Urban Design (R, L)
VART 1160 Architectural Language (R, L)
VART 2050 Designing the City (R, L, EL)
VART 2055 Environmental Design (R, L, EL)
VART 3055 Ecology for Designers (L)
VART 3070 Architectural Design (R, L)
VART 3080 Architectural Studio A (R, L)
VART 3090 Architectural Studio B ( R, L)
VART 4090 Senior Project Architecture (R, L)

New York City
AFAM 3632 Harlem Renaissance (ER)
ANTH 3180-Cultures of New York City (L)
ARHI 3545 Manhattan Architecture (L)
ENGL 3093 Writing the New Yorker (L)
ENGL 4121 New York City in Fiction (L)
HIST 3565 History of New York City (L)
POSC 3120 Seminar: Internship in New York City Government (R)
POSC 3121 New York City Politics (R)
SPAN 2640 Spanish & New York City (R, L)
VART 2085 Sustainable New York (L)


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
 
AFAM 3036 Global Black Youth Cultures (R, L)
Course will explore how adolescent and young adult members of the African Diaspora form youth subcultures and engage with popular culture transnationally. The courses focus is comparative with attention to American, Caribbean, Afro-Latino, and African youth.
 
AFAM 3115-Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X (R, L, EL)
An examination of the lives, philosophies, and historical influences of Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X.  Our main goals are to trace the development in their thinking, and to examine the similarities and differences between them. Finally, we will seek to evaluate their contribution to the African-American freedom struggle, American society and the world. Our method of study will emphasize the VERY close reading of the primary and secondary material; the use of audio and videocassettes; lecture presentations and class discussions. 
 
AFAM 3130 Racial and Ethnic Conflict (R)
This course will examine the major sources of tension between ethnic and racial groups in the American city as well as the political and cultural traditions of various ethnic groups.
  
AFAM 3134 From Rock and Roll to Hip Hop (R)
A study of urban youth culture through an examination of musical forms and their evolution from the post WWII era to the present. Begins with Rock and Roll and ends with Rap and Hip Hop.
 
AFAM 3632 Harlem Renaissance (ER)
A study of the literature of the period known as the Harlem Renaissance. Writers include James Weldon Johnson, Jean Toomer, Nella Larsen, Jessie Fauset,Zora Neale Hurston and Langston Hughes.
 
AFAM 4896 Feeling the Funk (R)
Focuses on Latin and Caribbean traditions in American popular music.
 
ANTH 2620 Anthropology of Cities (R)
This course explores the everyday life of cities in a range of international contexts. We will investigate the formation of urban neighborhoods, urban ties based on ethnicity and religious beliefs, multilingualism, and changing notions of the city due to globalization.

ANTH 3180 Cultures of New York City (L)
This course explores the cultural diversity of New York City from an Anthropological perspective. The focus will be on how different groups use urban public spaces, e.g., ethnic and religious communities within the city and urban subcultures. Students will use readings to inform their own ethnographic research on the cultures of New York.

ANTH 3342 Race in the Americas (R)
The course will look at the construction, maintenance and articulation of race in the different regions of the continent within a comparative perspective. The main focus on the course will be to assess how different racial meanings and identities are negotiated throughout the Americas, and to see the differences and similarities of these regional overlaps. The course will also focus on how race is historically negotiated with other social categories such as class, status, gender and sexuality, to produce the vibrant racial identities in the contemporary age of globalization. Particular emphasis will be placed on issues such as the social construction of race, the African diaspora, mestizaje, Indian (Native-American) social movements and ethnogenesis.
 
ANTH 3340 Anthropological Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity (L)
A cross-cultural, interdisciplinary consideration of the concepts of race and ethnicity, this course examines racial and ethnic categories and explores how they form, how society gives them meaning and the circumstances under which they change. 

ANTH 3346 Drugs, Culture, and Society (L)
This course examines the relationship among drugs, politics and society from a cross-cultural perspective. Includes discussion of the use of mind-altering and habit-forming substances by "traditional societies"; the development of a global trade in sugar, opium, and cocaine with the rise of capitalism; and the us e and abuse of legal and illegal drugs in the US and other selected countries.

ANTH 3353 Anthropology of Globalization (R)
Although globalization began in the 14th century with the voyage of Columbus, it is very much a contemporary concept. More than any other social system, globalization has permeated every institution, structure, and human relationship, thereby generating a whole new structure of values. Even though globalization has resulted in more development, it also brought great inequalities, frustrations, and conflicts among nations. The objective of this course is to provide students with substantive knowledge and understanding of the process from its many anthropological and cultural dimensions.

ANTH 3354 Race, Identity and Globalization (R)
The course will explore the power of racial discourses in the production of global difference over the last five decades. Particular emphasis will be placed on the work of James Baldwin to understand the insights of the North American civil rights movement, and its global influence since the 1960's. The civil rights movement coalesced at an important moment of global historical questioning, and along with the African and Caribbean national liberation movements, anti-Vietnam war protests, feminist and gay struggles and the student uprisings in Europe and Latin America, marked a particular manner in which to re-think global concepts such as democracy, citizenship, transnational identity, and political consciousness. The objective of the course is tomake use of Baldwin's racial, national, and global reflections to understand the global effects of the progressive movements initiated five decades ago.
 
ANTH 3615 Urban Anthropology (L)
This course will introduce you to some of the key issues in urban anthropology witha focus on culture, politics, and power. We will investigate topics such as poverty, gentrification, globalization, race and class, popular culture,and social change in cities as diverse as Chicago, Tokyo, Rio de Janeiro, London, China, India, and New York among others.
 
ARHI 2232 Islamic Cities (L)
This course will provide an historical overview of some of the most important cities of the Islamic world, including Medina, Damascus, Baghdad, Cairo, Istanbul, Isfahan and others.  It will trace the foundations of new cities and the "Islamization" of older ones, and historically examine the role of religious principles and behavior on urban form.  We will also examine material and cultural differences internal to the Islamic world that contribute to its dazzling diversity of urban settings.  Though interdisciplinary inapproach, a major focus will be on architecture and urban form.  In our historical trajectory we occasionally will take a glance westward at comparable/contrastive features in Venice, Paris, etc.  A final section of the course will dealwith the urbanism of colonial powersin the Middle East. (Globalism)
 
ARHI 2460 Architecture: 1300-1750 (R)
The history of European architecture from 1300 to 1750. Special emphasis willbe given to the ecclesiastic and civic architecture of Italy during Michelangelo's lifetime and France during King Louis XIV's reign. (Renaissance/Baroque)

ARHI 2540 Modern Architecture (R, EL)
Ranging from c. 1750 to the present, this course emphasizes the rise of modernism in the first half of the 20th century. Stylistic and technical innovations will be examined in their socio-historical context. Mega projects- social housing, transport infrastructures, the tall building- to be considered, as well as individual careers of such modern masters as Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, Alvar Aalto and Louis Kahn. (Modern)
 
ARHI 3100 Museum Methods (L)
Exploration of materials and techniques of the visual arts and a study of the different types of modern institutions for their exhibition. The course relies on field trips to museums, galleries and other institutions, mainly in New York City.
 
ARHI 3315-The City of Rome (L)
This course surveys the art, architecture and urban planning of the city of Rome from its founding through the Middle Ages. We shall follow Rome through its various manifestations, from primitive village to capital of empire and finally, center of Christian pilgrimage. Particular attention will be paid to art and monuments in their broader urban, social and historical contexts.
 
ARHI 3351-Issues in Architecture (R)
Utilizing case studies drawn from global history and the contemporary world, this course will critically examine architecture from a number of thematic angles and in a variety of cultural contexts in order to familiarize students with important conceptual and theoretical issues in architectural history and criticism. Possible topics include: Architecture and the City; The Role of the Architect; Gender and Space; How Buildings Mean; Vernacular and Academic Architecture; Architecture and Power; Technology and Architectural Development; Aesthetics in Architectural History; Architectural Form, Function and Actual Usage; Buildings and Cultural Identity.
 
ARHI 3540 Contemporary Architecture (L)
Readings in the theories and criticism of architecture since 1970, including such tendencies as late modernism, post-modernism, new urbanism, neo-rationalism, deconstructivism, neo-vernacular, etc. Consideration will be given to the current discourse in journals, exhibitions, projects and reviews. (Modern)
 
ARHI 3545 Manhattan Architecture (L)
Through on-site visits in New York City, this course examines representative examples of differing styles from Federal to Post-Modern. Emphasis placed on landmark buildings of 19th-century revival styles. Modern architecture will be traced from the development of the skyscraper to the present. (Modern)
 
CISC 2500 Information and Data Management (L)
This course will introduce the fundamentals of information storage, access and retrieval using a variety of structures, formats, and systems in computing, internet and information technologies. Projects and case studies will be drawn from the sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities and professional studies in medicine and health, business and commerce, justice and law, and education. Students will have hands-on experience in the acquisition and management of information from a diverse on-line and remote database.

COLI 3450 The City in Literature (L)
The structures, spaces, people, and life patterns of cities in the imagination of writers and visual artists from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. We will focus on Berlin, Paris, and New York, using the work of Walter Benjamin as a stimulus to thinking about our own relationship to the urban environment.
 
COMM 2000 Theories of Media, Culture and Society (R, L)
An overview of theory and research concerning media and mass communicationin relation to culture and society. Provides students with the ability to analyze the institutions, forms and content of media.

COMM 2603 Media and the Arts (R)
An examination of the arts from cave painting to contemporary, electronic forms. Shifts in the form and style, the purpose and the role of the traditional fine arts will be studied in the technological and cultural contexts in which they occurred. Emphasis will be placed on the co-development of new arts and information technologies in the 20th century.

COMM 3571 Popular Music as Communication (R, L)
Current issues in popular music studies-mediation, globalization, authenticity, identity, community, etc.- covering a wide range of popular music in North America. Regular reading and listening assignments.

COMM 3601 Class, Taste, and Mass Culture (R, L)
An examination of cultural hierarchy and conflicting notions regarding the "ideal" form and content of the symbolic environment. Drawing from various critiques of the mass media, this course explores the ways in which debates about cultural and aesthetic standards reflect socio-economic and political concerns.

COMM 4603 Media and Popular Culture (R, L)
An exploration of various forms of contemporary popular culture and their meanings in modern life. Theoretical approaches are discussed and various media texts such as film, television, advertising images, popular icons, music and style are analyzed.
 
ECON 3240 World Poverty (R)
An investigation into the causes and consequences of poverty, both in the United States and in developing countries. The available statistics and the economic explanations of poverty are surveyed. Contemporary debates over policies to reduce poverty are discussed, including issues of welfare, food and housing subsidies, foreign aid, famine reliefand agricultural development. The link between income distribution and economic growth is also discussed.

ECON 3244 International Economic Policy (R, L)
This course uses economic methodology to study the fundamental relationship between wealth and political power in the contextof various international and economic policies. The course follows the outline of Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations. Contemporary issues covered can include protectionism, economic coordination. (This course complements PORU 3915.)

ECON 3430 Sustainable Business (R)
This foundation course for the GSB-FCRH Sustainable Business minor covers the ethical, economic, and scientific principles needed to manage and promote enterprises that are both profitable but also socially and environmentally responsible. Using case studies, guest speakers and their own research students acquire the comprehensive perspective necessary to manage and promote social entrepreneurship within large and small companies and to work with NGOs, fair trade groups, private-public sector partnerships and micro-enterprises, etc. Sustainable means profitable, environmentally sound and enabling for small scale entreprenuers. Case studies range from Google’s East Coast Wind Power grid to carbon offset programs in the Amazon to mobile phone remittance based microfinance programs in Africa.
 
ECON 3570 Labor Market and Diversity (R)
The goal of this course is to enable students to think independently about labor market and diversity issues. This course will (a) provide an introduction to the economic analysis of behaviors and institutions in the labor market; and (b) give students the tools to deal with diversity questions within the labor market such as educational attainment, employment discrimination, and income inequality accross gender and racial groups. Economic logic and evidence will be used to analyze employer and employee decisions and the institutional factors shaping those decisions 

ECON 3850 Environmental Economics (R)
Good economic analysis underlies many successful environmental policies, from reducing airand water pollution to the Montreal Accord limiting ozone depleting gases. However, the environmental challenges of global warming, biodiversity and sustainable development are increasing global as well as politically and economically complex. This course reviews the key economic ideas underlying past successes and explores potential solutions for sustaining economic growth with environmental preservation in rich and poor countries alike.

ECON 3971 Urban Economics (L)
Urban Economics is the study of location choices by firms and households. The technological changes and economic factors driving the process of urbanization, and the shift from a "downtown"-centered city to the suburbanized metropolises prevalent in the U.S. today is the central focus of the course. Throughout the course, New York City's history and current situation is used as an example of the economic forces operating on cities. Students will participate in a group project to analyze a major urban problem such as housing affordability, poverty, crime or education.

ENGL 3069 Writing and the City (R)
In this class we'll be reading (and writing) fiction, literary non-fiction, and poetry about urban life. Readings will center on three cities: New York, Paris, and Cairo.
 
ENGL 3093 Writing the New Yorker (L)
Writing for all sections of the New Yorker Magazine; exercises in creative non-fiction and investigates journalism.

ENGL 3440 Victorian Cosmopolitanisms (L) 
We will examine how literature of the Victorian period conceptualized the figure of the cosmopolitan. How did citizens of the world's largest empire imagine "a citizen of the world"? How national or cosmopolitan-- or both-- was that empire itself? To answer these questions we will look at the works of Alfred Tennyson, Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, George Eliot, and Bram Stoker. We will also read some critical theory.

ENGL 3629-20th C. African-American Literature (R)
A study of central African American writers in their cultural and historical contexts.

ENGL 3652 New Wave Immigrant Fiction (L)
If the immigrant of the late 1800s and early 1900s valued assimilation, the post-1965 newcomer to America has forged a new cultural identity. This course will look at the attempts to situate oneself in America while maintaining a tie to one’s family’s country of origin in works by authors such as Amy Tan, Bharati Mukherjee, Gish Jen, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Cristina Garcia and others.
 
ENGL 4121 New York City in Fiction (L)
This course will explore both short stories and novels written in and about New York City during the final quarter of the 20th century.
 
ENVP 3070 Green Architecture (R, L)
Study of techniques and pursuit of research in green architecture.
 
HIST 1950 Understanding Historical Change: Urban Perspective (L)
Uses texts and the visual arts, history, and cultural theory to study cities and the process of urbanization from the 18th Century to the present day. The focus is on both Western and non-western cities and the processes of urban globalization.

HIST 3102 Worker in American Life (R)
This course will deal with the lives of American workers after the Industrial Revolution. Focusing on the unions and industrial relations, the course will also explore changes in the family and community life of workers, as well as immigration, religion, and the impact of radical movements.

HIST 3565 History of New York City (L)
The development of the City and the region from the Dutch to the deficit.

HIST 3619 World’s Fairs (L)
Upper division course examining the world's fairs as a representation of modern culture. Topics include architecture and urbanism, leisure and amusement, tourism, and the conception of mass culture. Fairs in both Europe and America will be covered from the nineteenth century to the present.

HIST 3624 European Cities (L)
Topical study of the evolution of Europe's cities with emphasis on urban culture, society and the built environment. Considers the nature of urban transformation in key urban places such as Paris, London, Berlin, Rome and Moscow.

HIST 3626 Social History of Architecture (L)
Studies thehistorical relationship between architecture, space and urban culture and the ways in which architectural innovations acts as both a reflection of and a catalyst for social and cultural transformation. Considers architecture and cultural theory as well as the evolution of building technologies.

HIST 3629 Maritime Cities (L)
History of maritime cities from premodern to contemporary age. Focus is on global economic systems and trade networks, evolution of maritime society and culture, the built environment. Looks at relationship between cities and the sea from cultural and environmental standpoint.
 
HIST 3806 US Immigration/Ethnicity (R)
A survey of immigration and ethnicity in American life. Themes include the motives for migration; America's reception of immigrants; the formation of immigrant communities; the intersection of ethnicity with race, gender, religion, politics, and class; the personal meanings of ethnic identity; and the relationship of ethnicity to American national identity.

HIST 3831 Rise of the American Suburb (L)
The suburb is often identified a residential space located a safe distance from the an adjacent urban center. It is envisioned as the creation of post war America providing an insulated and homogenized community for white America. This long standing characterization is not only inaccurate but misses the historical symbiosis between the American suburb and the American dream. Beginning in the first half of the nineteenth century this constructed space became the locus and the expression of the ideas, values, and virtues associated with success and the good life-the very embodiment of the American dream.

HIST 3922 East Asian Cities (L)
To 1800, half of mankind's urban history was East Asian history. Cities played central--if rather different--roles in the social, cultural, and political histories of China and Japan. After their incorporation at gun-point into a system of industrializing nation-states, pre-existing urban hierarchies were restructured, their functions transformed. In this course, we explore both the indigenous experience and its modern transformation.

HIST 3940 The African City (R)
This Service-Learning Initiative course examines the histories of urban centers in Africa and her Black Atlantic Diaspora. Representative cities are St. Louis (Senegal), Timbuktu (Mali), Accra (Ghana), Alexandria (Egypt), Khartoum (Sudan), Cape Town (South Africa), Dar es Salaam (Tanzania), Zanzibar City (Zanzibar), Harare (Zimbabwe), Salvador-Bahia (Brazil), New York City (USA), and Liverpool (England). The cities represent the spatial, aesthetic, and demographic, economic, political, and social histories that have produced "TheAfrican City" both in Africa and the wider Black Atlantic world. Through Service-Learning Initiative's "living and learning," students will experience, first hand, the historical processes through which New York City became and continues to be an "African city." Interaction with New York's historic African-American community, as well as its growing African immigrant community, will help students understand the links between forced migration of enslaved Africans to the city and more recent waves of African immigration which have renewed the city's linkages with the continent.

HIST 3990 North American Environmental History (R)
The course will explore various aspects of North American Environmental History.
 
HUAF 4001 Humanitarian Action (L)
Provides students with an overview of the principle actors in the humanitarian field, including their roles, missions and mandates. It bridges the divide between theoretical and practical approaches to humanitarian assistance and provides an interdisciplinary perspective to the analysis of gender, age, human rights frameworks, and indigenous cultures within conflict and post-conflict situations.
  
MUSC 2014 Jazz, A History in Sound (R)
This course studies jazz historically from the turn of the 20th century to the present, through both the shifting relations between white and black cultures in America, and the changes in musical tastes and practices over time. It considers the development of New Orleans, Swing, bebop, modal, fusion, and contemporary jazz styles, with specialattention to the contributions of Armstrong,Ellington, Parker, Davis and Coltrane.
 
NSCI 1040 People and the Living Environment (L, EL)
Introduces the non-science major to the place of humans in global biological systems. Topics include principles of population and community ecology, learning and behavior, evolution and sustainability. Laboratory sessions will complement the lecture topics.
 
PHIL 3109 Environmental Ethics (R, L)
This senior values seminar surveys major theories in environmental ethics dealing with our moral duties regarding nature: for example, environmental stewardship, sustainable development, environmental justice, ecological virtue ethics, animal rights, biocentrism, Leopold's land ethic, and ecological feminism. It has not only philosophical but also scientific, economic, political, and design dimensions as it deals with such topics as global warming, alternative energy, pollution control, suburban sprawl, deforestation, biodiversity loss, and the prospect of a sixth mass species extinction event threatening the future of human and nonhuman life as we know it.
  
POSC 2102 Intro to Urban Politics (R)
A study of politics and power within urban political systems, including an examination of their historical development, current political economy, and prospects for the future.
 
POSC 2320 Politics of Immigration (L)
Study of political issues concerning immigration.
 
POSC 2507 Environmental Politics (R)
The course introduces students to the history and evolution of environmentalism and environmental policy from a comparative perspective.

POSC 3109 Political Economy of Poverty (R, L)
An examination of the causes of domestic and international poverty with particular emphasis on developing a critical awareness of the values that underlie both contending theories of poverty and alternative solutions to the poverty problem. Part of the course will involve direct contact by the students with organizations currently dealing with the poverty issue.

POSC 3120 Seminar: Internship in New York City Government (R)
Students are placed in New York City government agencies and in organizations active in the city's politics. Interns must work in the field for 8-10 hours per week, attend weekly seminars, and undertake academic projects.

POSC 3121 New York City Politics (R)
An analysis of the New York City political system. Attention will be paid to the participants in New York City government and politics, thefactors that influence policy making in New York City, as well as public policies produced by the system.
 
POSC 3130 Politics of Urban Planning & Development (R)
Analysis of the political dimensions of urbanplanning in cities and metropolitan areas. The political nature of planning in particular policy areas(e.g. urban renewal, housing, neighborhood preservation, etc.) is examined.

POSC 3140 Politics and Economic Globalization (R, L, EL, EW)
An examination of the political and economic consequences of a globalized economy. Special attention will be paid to the impacts of globalization on: employment and wages, unions and labor rights, the environment, indigenous cultures, hunger and poverty, the distribution of wealth, corporate power, national sovereignty, social welfare policy, and political democracy.
 
POSC 3202 Civil Rights (L)
A casebook analysis of legal responses to public and private discrimination, with emphasis on race and gender. Examines Supreme Court decisions, laws, and politics, involving the 5th, 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th amendments, equal protection and level of scrutiny, civil and voting rights, public accommodations, employment, private associations, schools, privacy, "natural" roles, the public/private dichotomy. Studies movements for equality. Evaluates busing, affirmative action, pay equity and other remedies.

POSC 3307 Environmental Politics (R)
The course introduces students to the history and evolution of environmentalism and environmental policy from a comparative perspective.
 
POSC 3507 International Human Rights (L)
An examination of the international system for the protection of human rights: legal and political theory, cultural relativism, diplomatic protection and the concept of human rights law; legal instruments and institutions; substantive law.
 
POSC 3610 Political Economy of Development (R)
The course will focus on an analysis of contending interpretations of the consequences of the economic interrelationships between industrially developed and developing areas.

POSC 4454 Seminar: Global Justice
What is global justice and how may we attain it? This course considers the answers of Immanuel Kant, John Rawls, Martha Nussbaum, Samuel Huntington, Michael Handt, Antonio Negri, Sayyd Qutb, and Pema Chodron.

POSC 4610 Seminar: Globalization (L)
This seminar provides an overview of the core theoretical views on globalization: its historical development, the main actors, and determinants of "winners and losers" of globalization. The second part of the seminar will use case studies that highlight specific issues most contested in the discussion of globalization to foster a connection between the theories we covered and the actual unfolding of globalization as experienced by a number of actors.
 
PSYC 3340 Urban Psychology (L)
How living in a large citycan affect an individual's behavior and personality. Investigations into the "urban personality," stress, family, friends and strangers, crowding, the built environment, adaptation. Includes field research.
 
SOCI 2410 Inequality: Class, Race, Ethnicity (R)
The recent history of the U.S. as a nation of distinct socioeconomic classes and the persistence of racial and ethnic conflict as a factor affecting inequality.

SOCI 2420-Social Problems of Race and Ethnicity (R)
This course explores the historical and contemporary issues surrounding the impact that race and ethnicity have in society. Students will examine how racial and ethnic criteria oftenguide important economic,political, and social decisions that affect access to resources by variousgroups and which usually have major consequences for the individual.
 
SOCI 2600 Intro to Social Work & Welfare (R, EW)
Introduction to values, knowledge and skills of social work professions. Focus on historical and contemporary rules and relations of social work profession. Also includes social welfare history and policy.

SOCI 2606 Social Science Statistics (L)
Introduces the student to the basic concepts of both descriptive and inferential statistics. Both models will be presented, their assumptions delineated, and their application to research in the social sciences emphasized.
 
SOCI 2610 Urban Community Development (R)
Analysis of human problems in urban planning and development. Students will study how people interact to meet common goals and needs in a variety of community modes. Included are considerations of interpersonal commitment, intergroup conflict, and the relationship between community membership and individual well-being in a complex and changing society. The course reviews various models and programs of American "inner city" restoration.
 
SOCI 2650 Basic Research Methods (L)
A survey of the basic tools for data collection and research design. Focus on decisions involved in the selection of the research problem, research design and the interpretation of data. Methods to be explored include participant observation, survey analysis, content analysis and the case study approach.

SOCI 2690 Urban Research Methods (R)
This course provides an overview of and hands-on approach to many of the research methods useful for urban planners, policy makers, and public administrators. Topics covered include the use of census data for describing, estimating, and projecting local area populations; survey research; evaluation research, field research, and social experiments.

SOCI 2703 Social Deviance (R, L)
The study of deviance is closely related to social power and social class. Deviance from, or conformity to, social rules or norms raises the question, Who rules? The study of deviance has been particularly concerned with issues of class, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality.

SOCI 2850 Methods of Social Research I (R)
Students are introduced to the fundamentals of empirical research while actively being involved in the research process by conducting their own survey. The first course includes a survey of different methodologies used by social scientists. Students gain hands-on experience in writing a literature review, specifying a research question, developing research hypotheses, designing a questionnaire and collecting data through interviewing.  

SOCI 2851 Methods of Social Research II (R)
The second course focuses on data analysis. Students learn simple descriptive and inferential statistics in conjunction with how to use the computer. These skills provide the basis for obtaining answers to research questions and testing hypotheses so that students can write their final research reports.

SOCI 2925 Media, Crime, Sex, and Violence (R)
An analysis of mass media reporting, presentation and explanation.

SOCI 2960 Popular Culture (R, EL)
This course will investigate the nature of contemporary popular culture. How do people spend their "spare time"? Does this vary with social class? Is sport the new religion? And how does this differ from that of earlier periods and simpler societies?

SOCI 3000 Latino Images in Media (L)
An analysis of changing Latino images in U.S. media. The emphasis will be on English language film and television productions. Gender, color and class issues will be examined.

SOCI 3017 Inequality in America (R, L, ER, EL)
A study of the ways in which inequalities of wealth, power, and prestige are institutionalized in complex societies. Social class and social status as they relate to other aspects of social organization and affect the life chances of individuals.

SOCI 3020 Identities/Inequalities in American Society (R)
Why do men earn more than women? Why do Blacks and Latinos earn high school diplomas at a much lower rate than Asian Americans? Why did the confirmation hearing of Judge Sonya Sotomayor stroke debates about mediocrity? Why did it take until 2008 for the U.S. to elect its first non-white president? These questions all resolve around privileges, stereotypes, and discriminations associated with race, gender, class, ethnicity, and sexuality. In this course, we will discuss how these dimensions of identity (along with our age, ability, status, nationality, etc.) structure our experience of the world and our life chances, and we will learn how sociologists make sense of differences and inequality in American society.
 
SOCI 3043 Global Inequalities (L)
An examination of stratification and inequality in four regions of the world, i.e., Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas, with a focus on global economic trends, ethnic conflicts and the links between race, class, gender and the healthof populations around the globe. Special attention will be given to current events and foreign and international policy.
   
SOCI 3136 Causes and Consequences of Inequality (R)
What are the causes and consequences of inequality? Special consideration is given to the inequalities associated with class, sex and racial/ethnic membership.

SOCI 3140 Old and New Minorities in the U.S (R)
The situations of old minority groups, such as African Americans, Japanese, and earlier European immigrants, as compared to those of more recent groups such as Puerto Ricans, Cubans, other Hispanics, and recent Asian immigrants, including refugees.

SOCI 3148 Population and Economic Development Issues (R)
An examination of the interrelationships among development, population growth and migration. Fertility and migration (including urbanization) in the Third World will be reviewed in the context of development perspectives. The determinants and consequences of fertility and migration and their policy implications will be considered in a number of development sectors.
 
SOCI 3160 The Modern City (R, L)
In this course students will examine the formation and structure of contemporary cities in the United States and the Third World. The current urban situation will be put in perspective by understanding city origins, urbanization, and the causes of urbangrowth and change.
 
SOCI 3404-Gender and Migration (R)
This class explores trends in contemporary migration in the United States and elsewhere. Using gender as an interpretive framework, we focus on the origins of migration flows and the incorporation of immigrants in host societies. We address questions such as: Is migration emancipatory for women, for men? How does the experience of migration and settlement differ for men and women? In what other ways is migration and settlement a gendered process? Attention is given to other forms of social differentiation that intersect with gender to produce distinctive experiences of migration such as citizenship, race, and ethnicity.

SOCI 3405-Gender, Race, Class (R, L)
This course examines the relationship between gender, race, andclass as overlapping dimensions of social experience in the U.S. Drawing on a variety of sources, including theoretical, ethnographic, andliterary writings, each of these dimensions is considered as part of a complex approach to social problems.

SOCI 3406 Race/Social Construct (R)
This course concerns the evolution of racial typologies and classification system in the U.S. We will draw on a variety of texts from natural and social sciences, law, and literature to examine how "scientific" typologies of race are actually more reflective of power dynamics and social hierarchies than biological or genetic differences. Our goal is to understand the continuing significance of race in terms of social and economic power,as well and individual self-conceptualizations and identity politics.

SOCI 3408 Diversity in American Society (L, EW)
An examination of historical and contemporary diversity in the United States. Diversity is defined according to ethnicity, race, religion, class andother relevant social groups. A comparison of the situation of old and new ethnic and immigrant groups will be made with special attention to factors affecting integration into the society.

SOCI 3410 Migration and Globalization (R)
The study of immigration and migration has become more important as the movement of people around the globe has increased in magnitude and frequency. The course will focus on migration in the context of globalization, that is, the growing integration of economics and societies around the world. We will also give attention to assimilation, transnationalism, the state and the regulation of immigrants and selectedtopics such as gender, culture and family.

SOCI 3415 Development and Globalization (R)
This course will investigate development and globalization issues. Initially taking a broad theoretical approach and then delving into specific nation-state case study examples, students will be challenged to consider how globalization in terms of technology-based interconnectedness, cultural Westernization, economic liberalization, and political/social democratization is changing the lives of people throughout the world. Aspects of integration, assimilation, and reactionary movements and trends will be explored.
 
SOCI 3427 Hispanics in the USA (W)
Explores the Hispanic mosaic in the U.S. Special emphasis is given to Hispanic education, culture and assimilation; the political significance of Hispanics; issues of gender, color and race; and work and the changing economy.

SOCI 3430-Latinos and Public Policy(R)
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the importance of public policy in molding the Latino experience in the U.S. Attention will be given to issues central to political and economic development, such as education, labor and immigration policies. Critical analysis of the history of U.S. public policy will enable students to better comprehend contemporary policy debates and decisions.

SOCI 3601 Urban Poverty (L)
This course deals with contemporary issuesand problems in cities, with a special focus on residential segregation and urban poverty.
 
SOCI 3602 Urban Sociology (R, L)
One of the most significant developments in human historyhas been the development of cities. This course will examine the evolution and contemporary characteristics of cities in sociological perspective. The course includes a descriptive overview of the growth and development of cities and a discussion of the current state of urban America. Particular attention will be paid to New York City. We will also analyze various theoretical approaches to understanding urbanization, such as the human-ecological and Marxist theories.
 
SOCI 3670-Hispanic Women (L)
An examination of the changing roles of Hispanic women with regard to Hispanic men, motherhood, the labor force experience, sexual awareness, media myths, political and economic power and women's liberation. The structural position and changing concepts of Hispanic women in the Americas will be examined through the lenses of analytical work and literature.

SOCI 3675-Latinas: Immigration/Inequality (R)
This course provides an introduction to feminist as well as gender theories which now explain the stratification of women in both US and Latino societies. In addition, students are introduced to US-based Latino as well as Latin American literatures and the different dimensions or tools through which gender, socialization, and power stratification are measured. The objective of the course are: a.) to examine the historical processes that have structured the identity of Latina women as part of a minority group; b.) to review and provide synthesis of existing feminine and gender paradigms on power inequality; and c.) to provide critical analysis of the applicability of these models in understanding the current integration of Latina and immigrant women in American society.
   
SOCI 4902 Internship Seminar: Community Organizations (R)
Through this course, students will work at specially arranged internships in Bronx-based agencies and organizations. Class discussions will focus on linking and integrating student's work experiences with the major issues and problems challenging the nation's cities; as well as, with current social problems.

SOCI 4960 Contemporary Issues in U.S. Immigration (R)
Immigration patterns have significantly affected the development of US society since its inception in the 1990's, United States experience a record number of new immigrants, and the post 2000 period is maintaining a high volume of immigration, perhaps heading to another record. This course uses a sociological perspective to address various impacts of immigration in US society.
 
SOCI 4961 Urban Issues & Policies (R)
A discussion of urban issues and policies.
 
SOCI 4970 Community Service/Social Action (R)
This course will deepen students understanding of the meaning of community service and social action in America and challenge them to confront the moral issues and social commitments necessary to be members of a just democratic society.
  
SPAN 2640 Spanish & New York City (R, L)
Service Learning Course - Community Service Required Students must receive permission from the Modern Language Department before adding this class.

URST 3070 Urban Design (L, R)
A studio course in urban design for public spaces, neighborhoods, urban districts, campus planning, parks, infill developments and expansions. A major design project is prefaced with research in urban history, infrastructural technologies, case studies, and diagrammatic analysis. Portfolio layouts. Field trips, workshops, lab fee, and office hours visits are required.
 
VART 1101 Urbanism (R, L, EL)
A historical introduction to the issues, principles and processes of urban design in western societies. Lectures will trace the evolution of selected cities (from ancient Athens to contemporary Los Angeles) taking into consideration the design decisions that have affected our built environment andurban culture. Field Trips. (Satisfies Fine Arts core requirement).

VART 1160 Architectural Language (R, L)
FormerlyAR 2060 - Architectural Design I - Introducing the basic language of 3D form and space making, this studio course involves students in the process of architectural vision, critique, analysis and creation. Emphasizing short, elementary in-class assignments, students learn to use the same tools --sketching,diagramming, scale model making, and computer modeling and animation-- used by design professionals to shape our world. Lab fee. All are welcome.

VART 2003 Intro to Digital Graphing Tools (R)
In this course the student will learn the basic tools and operations of several different graphics programs. Photoshop, Illustrator, and QuarkXpress will be explained through demonstrations, tutorials, and weekly assignments. The focus will be on a conceptual and analytical approach to design vocabulary and problem solving.

VART 2050 Designing the City (R, L, EL)
A creative and practical course in urban design, focusing on the relationship between people and the built environment. Although urban design is a visual discipline, its roots and purposes are interdisciplinary, combining high ideals with hard realism. Readings, walking tours, and research examine the historical roots of current urban design problems and practices. Seminar discussions highlight the goals: regenerative neighborhoods and lively public places.Smart growth, sustainable communities, and new urbanism are contrasted with suburban sprawl and auto-centered development. Students use Mac-based CAD software to visualize great new public places in New York--practicing the imaginative are of the possible. Visits during office hours are recommended. Fieldtrips and lab fee are required. Recommended to Urban and Environmental Studies students, but open to all.

VART 2055 Environmental Design (R, L, EL)
This introductory course explores the physical relationship between mankind and nature. Slide presentations, field trips and readings will outline the histories and forms of settlement patterns, landscapes and gardens, and our increasing interest in sustainable development, renewable energy and conservation. Sketching, design and model-building in landscape settings. Intended for design, history and science students. Formerly AR 2055 - Design and Nature - This introductory design course explores the relationship between natural and artificial design systems. Readings, field trips, illustrated lectures and seminar sessions outline the histories and forms of settlements and landscapes, design attitudes towards 14ture, and our increasing interests in green design strategies, sustainable urban development, environmental footprint reduction, renewable energy and conservation. Each student completes an individual research assignment, and contributes to a team design project. Intended for Visual Arts, Urban Studies, Environmental Studies and Science students. Office hours visits recommended. Required field trips and lab fee.
 
VART 2085 Sustainable New York (L)
A workshop in big city "greening." Although intended for majors in visual arts, environmental studies, and/or urban studies, this course will interest anyone concerned about New York City’s future in an era of rising energy costs and environmental risk. The course will be informed by walking tours, field trips, readings and discussions, illustrated presentations, visits to buildings, parks, and construction sites and guest speakers from state and city agencies, NGOs, nonprofits, and innovators in the private sector. Several sessions will meet outside Fordham.  By terms end, each student will present an independent research or design project.

VART 3055 Ecology for Designers (L)
An introduction to functional ecosystems, and the application of that knowledge to the re-design of the urban built environment. Energy use patterns, resource management, water cycles, productivity, food production, systems integration will be inspected, leading to the proposition of a hypothetical urban ecosystem, which may include water re-cycling, habitat restoration, bio-mimicry, renewable energy, and vertical farming.

VART 3070 Architectural Design (R, L)
Formerly AR 3070 - Architectural Design II - an intermediate design studio course. Informed by contemporary design theory, students synthesize site, environmental, urban, precedent and programmatic requirements in the design of small public buildings or installations. A major design project is prefaced and interspersed with shorter exercises in analysis, skill building, critique and fabrication. Portfolios layouts are also prepared. Field trips, lab fee, and office hours visits are required.
 
VART 3080 Architectural Studio A (R, L)
An advanced studio in architectural design, with individualized instruction tailored to each student's major and /or design interests. Major design projects assigned may emphasize environmental design, interior design, landscape design, installation, urban design,furniture design, or architectural design. Students in this class will assist in the critique of beginning students' work. Portfolio preparation. Field trips, lab fee, and office hours visits are required.

VART 3090 Architectural Studio B (R, L)
An advanced studio in architectural design, with individualized instruction tailored to each student's major and/or design interests. Major design projects assigned may emphasize environmental design, interior design, landscape design, installation, urban design, furniture design, or architectural design. Students in this class will assist in the critique of beginning students' work. Portfolio preparation. Field trips, lab fee, and office hours visits are required.
 
VART 3267 Film and the City (L)
After looking at ways in which the city has been framed historically in films, students will pursue research in the city using video as their tool. Using interviews, screen text, voice over, and other documentary techniques, students will explore a project of interest to them and make a series of short films that reveal an apsect of the urban milieu. In class sessions and in one on one meetings with the professor, students will propose and refine their project and gather feedback about communicating in visual language on city issues.

VART 4090 Senior Project Architecture (R, L)
In this advanced studio seminar, students may pursue a specific design project with the consent and guidance of a visual arts faculty member. Portfolio preparation. A program proposal, with a schedule, bibliography, and proposed site, is due at the outset. Portfolio preparation.


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