Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


Princeton Review Lists Law School Among Best in the Nation

Contact: Janet Sassi
212-636-7577
fallersassi@fordham.edu


Fordham Law School
Fordham University Law School is listed as one of the nation’s top programs in the Princeton Review’s 2008 Best 170 Law Schools guidebook.

The book, which hit bookshelves on Oct. 9, describes the Law School in a two-page profile as “the friendly law school of New York City” and praises the faculty’s “impressive professional experience.” Fordham also draws praise for having good career prospects for its students and a healthy mix of “practicing lawyers and theoretical academics” on its faculty.

“The school affords direct access to a multitude of excellent career opportunities,” according to the guidebook, and adding that its career center “will go to great lengths to help a student land a plum position.”

The Princeton Review ranks schools in 11 categories based on 18,000 student surveys and institutional data provided by school administrators. Among the categories are “Toughest to Get Into,” “Best Classroom Experience,” “Most Diverse Faculty” and “Best Quality of Life.” Notable at Fordham Law was its high admissions selectivity (a rating of 93 out of a possible 99) with 7,500 applications for 480 first-year seats. Also mentioned were the school’s excellent alumni support and encouragement and guidance from faculty.

The Princeton Review’s high rating is only the latest for the Law School. In April, the Law School broke into the top 25 in the nation in U.S. News and World Report’s America’s Best Graduate Schools rankings. And a 2006 analysis by AmLaw100 showed that Fordham ranked fifth in the number of graduates at the 30 firms with the highest average partner compensation. The only law schools ahead of Fordham were Harvard, NYU, Columbia and Georgetown.

Founded in 1841, Fordham is the Jesuit University of New York, offering exceptional education distinguished by the Jesuit tradition to approximately 15,600 students in its four undergraduate colleges and its six graduate and professional schools. It has residential campuses in the Bronx and Manhattan, a commuter campus in Westchester, and the Louis Calder Center Biological Field Station in Armonk, N.Y.
10/07

Site  | Directories
Submit Search Request