Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


'One Mic, One Movement' Conference Examines Hip Hop Therapies

Contact: Janet Sassi
212-636-7577
fallersassi@fordham.edu


 
Scholars, practitioners, students, and members of the community will converge at Fordham’s Lincoln Center campus this weekend for “One Mic, One Movement: Advances in Hip Hop Therapy and Hip Hop Psychology.”

The research conference, co-sponsored by the Graduate School of Social Service and Hip Hop Psychology, is the first to focus on the contemporary field of hip hop-based intervention studies. The term, “hip hop therapy (HHT)” was coined in 2002 by Edgar Tyson, Ph.D., assistant professor of social work, to refer to a form of treatment combining the innovative synergy of rap music, bibliotherapy, and music therapy.

“Hip hop-based interventions have received significant attention in literature and yet there has not been a conference solely dedicated to this unique aspect,” Tyson said. “One of the unique aspects of this conference is that the papers focus mainly on evidence.”

Saturday, Feb. 4, 9:15 a.m.
Pope Auditorium, Lowenstein Center
Lincoln Center campus, 113 W. 60th St., NY, NY


For registration information, please click here.

Tyson will be joined by doctoral students from Hip Hop Psychology, an organization fostering a sister movement of therapy, and by the following:

• Susan Hadley, Ph.D., MT-BC, professor of music therapy at Slippery Rock University;
• George Yancy, Ph.D, associate professor of philosophy at Duquesne University; and
• Mark Naison, Ph.D., professor of African-American studies and history, and principal investigator for the Bronx African-American History Project.

Liberated Soul Collective and other hip hop, spoken word, and rap artists will perform following the daylong conference.

 “It is fitting that in the birthplace of Hip Hop, New York City, we have a conference and concert that bring together artists, scholars, and practitioners from across the world to give their testimonies on the therapeutic impact of hip hop,” said Debangshu Roychoudhury, conference co-chair and doctoral candidate in psychology at the City University of New York.

Founded in 1841, Fordham is the Jesuit University of New York, offering exceptional education distinguished by the Jesuit tradition to more than 15,100 students in its four undergraduate colleges and its six graduate and professional schools. It has residential campuses in the Bronx and Manhattan, a campus in West Harrison, N.Y., the Louis Calder Center Biological Field Station in Armonk, N.Y., and the London Centre at Heythrop College in the United Kingdom.
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