Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


Fordham Student Wins British Marshall

Contact: Michele Snipe
(212) 636-7013
snipe@fordham.edu


NEW YORK—Fordham University Senior Vincent Evans has been awarded the prestigious British Marshall Scholarship, which allows him two years of advanced study at an English university. Evans, a philosophy major at Fordham College at Lincoln Center, will attend the Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) program at Oxford University next fall.

The Liberty, N.Y., native was one of 22 finalists in the New York region, and was among winners from the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton University and Stanford University. Evans, 21, has a 3.8 G.P.A. and participates in various extracurricular activities, including Tae Kwon Do, the College Democrats, Gannon Speech and Debate, and Alpha Sigma Nu, an honor society that promotes the core principles of Jesuit education — scholarship, loyalty and service.

“Vincent Evans is an outstanding student of philosophy and politics. He combines a first-class intellect with a passionate commitment to public service and social justice,” said Jay Iselim, C.B.E., chairman of the New York Marshall selection committee. “In time, we believe he will emerge as an important and innovative policy thinker and political leader.”

Evans is one of more than 100 Fordham students who have received prestigious fellowships in the last several years under the tutelage of Fordham’s Office for Prestigious Fellowships. Since its inception six years ago, the office has had great success in fulfilling its two-part mission: to increase the number of prestigious fellowships awarded to Fordham students, and to promote the overall intellectual activity of the University.

The Marshall Scholarship is financed by the British government and was established in 1953 as a gesture of thanks to the United States for its assistance under the Marshall Plan following World War II.

Founded in 1841, Fordham is New York City’s Jesuit University, offering exceptional education distinguished by the Jesuit tradition to approximately 15,800 students in its five undergraduate colleges and its six graduate and professional schools. It has residential campuses in the Bronx, Manhattan and Tarrytown, and the Louis Calder Center Biological Field Station in Armonk, N.Y.
11/04


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