Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


GSE Student Selected for Prestigious Research Seminar

Contact: Suzanne Stevens
(212) 636-6538
stevensgood@fordham.edu


NEW YORK— Tom Ellett (FCLC ’86), a third-year doctoral candidate in Fordham University’s Graduate School of Education  (GSE), is one of 40 students nationwide selected to participate in the David L. Clark Graduate Student Research Seminar. Students are selected based on the quality of detailed research proposals submitted to a nominating committee.

The Clark Seminar brings together the most talented doctoral students in the nation. Participants will share their research and dissertations, and receive guidance from a select group of five professors of education from across the country. This year’s faculty group includes Barbara L. Jackson, Ph.D., professor of education at Fordham. Sponsored by the University Council for Educational Administration, the seminar will take place April 10 and 11 in Montreal during the 2005 meeting of the American Education Research Association.

Tom  Ellett, assistant vice president for residential education at New York University, is studying the effects of residential learning communities on college freshmen.

“Tom's research is of great importance to the millions of college students who may experience a sense of isolation in college,” said Bruce Cooper, Ph.D., chair of the division of educational leadership, administration and policy at Fordham’s Graduate School of Education. “It will also be of benefit to college professionals responsible for the education and well-being of these students.”

Founded in 1917, Fordham’s Graduate School of Education prepares teachers, administrators, counselors and psychologists through challenging academic programs that integrate theory with reflective and innovative practice. The school offers graduate programs at the University’s Bronx, Manhattan and Westchester campuses.

Founded in 1841, Fordham is New York City’s Jesuit University, offering exceptional education distinguished by the Jesuit tradition to approximately 15,800 students in its five undergraduate colleges and its six graduate and professional schools. It has residential campuses in the Bronx, Manhattan and Tarrytown, and the Louis Calder Center Biological Field Station in Armonk, N.Y.
12/04


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