Fordham University            The Jesuit University of New York
 


GRE Spring Convocation Features Best-Selling Author

Contact: Victor Inzunza
(212) 636-7576
inzunza@fordham.edu


Fordham University’s Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education will hold its annual Spring Convocation on Jan. 27, featuring best-selling writer Richard Rohr, O.F.M., author of Radical Grace: Daily Meditations by Richard Rohr (Saint Anthony Messenger Press, 1995) and Simplicity: The Freedom of Letting Go (Crossroad Publishing Company, 2004).

The theme for the daylong event, now in its third year, is “Jesus as the First Non-Dual Teacher in the West,” which will focus on the continued misunderstanding of Jesus due to a rational, or “dualistic,” interpretation of his teachings. Attendees will also have the opportunity to learn about the many thought-provoking programs offered by the Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education. Registration for the event, which will be held at the McGinley Center on the Rose Hill campus, begins at 8 a.m. and the cost is $25 per person. For reservations, call (718) 817-4800.

“Originally, the convocation was an effort to connect alumni with students, but we’ve moved beyond that and opened it up to the general public,” said Anthony Ciorra, S.J., dean of the Graduate School of Religion and Religious Education.  “It’s an attempt to open up the campus to the wider community and promote interest in Fordham and some of the programs we offer.”

In its first year, the convocation drew 150 alumni and students, Father Ciorra said, and has grown to an expected attendance of 500 this year. Father Rohr, who is a Franciscan of the New Mexico Province and founder of both the New Jerusalem Community in Cincinnati and the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque, is best known for his writings on spirituality, and for numerous audio and videotapes. He is also a contributing editor at Sojourners magazine.

Founded in 1841, Fordham is the Jesuit University of New York, offering exceptional education distinguished by the Jesuit tradition to more than 15,600 students in its five undergraduate colleges and its six graduate and professional schools. It has residential campuses in the Bronx, Manhattan and Tarrytown, and the Louis J. Calder Center Biological Field Station in Armonk, N.Y.
01/07

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