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Inventor of Social Index Dies

O’Hare Teacher Leadership Program Launched

Marymount Promotes Inclusive Education

New Visual Arts Complex Opens

Ravazzin Center to Study Bermuda’s Growing Senior Population

ROTC Hall of Fame Inductees Celebrated


Inventor of Social Index Dies

Marc Miringoff, Ph.D., a pioneering professor who gained national prominence for his nontraditional social health index, died unexpectedly on Mar. 4. Miringoff, 58, an associate professor of social policy at the Graduate School of Social Service (GSS) at Tarrytown who had been at Fordham since 1983, challenged the notion that a community’s health could be gauged solely by economic indicators such as stock market performance and inflation. Instead, his annual Index of Social Health and the accompanying Social Health of the States publications measured states’ performance on 16 indicators, including infant mortality, teen suicides, unemployment, poverty among senior citizens, alcohol-related traffic deaths and food-stamp usage.

Miringoff believed the index provided a holistic assessment of a state’s quality of life and the health of its social institutions, and that the results provided a roadmap for where public dollars should be spent.

“Marc was a man of the 1960s who believed strongly in social justice,” said Peter Vaughan, Ph.D., the GSS dean. “He believed poverty should be eradicated, and he gave voice to people who didn’t have one.”

Miringoff was born in Brooklyn and received his undergraduate degree from the State University of New York at Albany, his master’s from Rutgers and his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He is survived by his wife, Marque, his brother, Lee, and his sister-in-law, Nancy Miringoff.

— Suzanne Stevens

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O’Hare Teacher Leadership Program Launched

Joseph A. O’Hare, S.J., president emeritus of Fordham (front row, center), celebrates the inauguration of the O’Hare, S.J., Ignatian Teacher Leadership Initiative at the Lincoln Center campus on Feb. 12. The program, a partnership between the New York Province of the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) and the Graduate School of Education, focuses on the development of a Jesuit and lay teacher leadership corps for Jesuit high schools and middle schools. Photo: Ken Levinson

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Marymount Promotes Inclusive Education

Marymount College faculty and students will begin working with elementary school teachers in the Peekskill and Mount Vernon public schools to help them keep special needs students in mainstream classrooms. The inclusive education program is being funded with a two-year, $10,000 grant from the New York State Education Department (NYSED), the second such grant Marymount has received.

Federal and state laws require that children with disabilities receive a free and appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment. However, in 1999, New York was sending a disproportionate number of students to special education—38 percent statewide compared to 24 percent nationally, according to the Least Restrictive Environment Coalition. NYSED is promoting inclusive education to combat this disparity.

“The Peekskill schools were cited as a district that refers too many students for special education,” said Neil Garofano, Ed.D., associate professor of education at Marymount and the grant’s lead faculty member. “The preconception is that everyone had to learn the same thing, the same way, at the same time. But there’s more than one way to teach skills. We are helping the teachers to understand that so that more kids can stay in the regular classroom.”

Proponents of inclusive education believe the approach is beneficial to both the disabled and the non-disabled student. Disabled students are seen as part of the community and are “held to higher standards than in the past, which elevates their achievement,” said Garofano. “The nondisabled child gets a priceless opportunity to explore diversity, and develop empathy and tolerance—many of the qualities we look for in a healthy society.”

— Maja Tarateta


New Visual Arts Complex Opens


Artist-in-residence Ross McLaren instructs visual arts students in the new digital video editing room, part of the renovated and expanded Visual Arts Complex on the Lincoln Center campus. The expansion, completed last fall, also includes a painting and drawing studio, a darkroom, faculty offices and an enlarged Push Pin Gallery, which features student work and the work of invited artists related to the curriculum. Photo: Ken Levinson

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Ravazzin Center to Study Bermuda’s Senior Population

The Ravazzin Center for Social Work Research in Aging at Fordham University’s Graduate School of Social Service, in cooperation with Bermuda College, has launched a study examining the needs of Bermuda’s growing senior population and their caregivers.

“The study will look at the service environment, identifying opportunities for enhancing Bermuda’s senior-care system and providing a greater focus to efforts to improve services to seniors and their families,” said Irene Gutheil, D.S.W., director of the Ravazzin Center.

The study, involving 300 participants, will identify the needs of seniors, the degree to which these needs are being met and the types of services seniors prefer. Through focus groups and a survey, it will also consider the challenges facing caregivers.

Students from Bermuda College, trained by staff from Fordham University, will interview and collect information from the study participants. According to Gutheil, a report documenting the study’s findings will focus on health, finance, housing, employment, volunteering and service needs. It will be released in September.

The project was funded through a grant from Atlantic Philanthropies, a Bermuda-based charitable organization that focuses its resources on disadvantaged and vulnerable people.

The Ravazzin Center for Social Work Research in Aging was established in 1995 to identify and address the needs of vulnerable older adults through research, colloquia, training and publications.

— Michael Larkin


ROTC Hall of Fame Inductees Celebrated

LTC Francis C. Licameli presents Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J., the Laurence J. McGinley Chair in Religion and Society, with a plaque honoring Cardinal Dulles' induction into the ROTC Hall of Fame. The presentation took place at the 78th Anniversary Military Ball on Feb. 28 in the McGinley Center ballroom. Cardinal Dulles served as a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy in the 1940s. Also inducted into the Hall of Fame were retired Lt. Robert J. Jeanette of the U.S. Army; Lt. Col. Robert Francis Kerr of the U.S. Air Force; the deceased Rev. Vincent Robert Capodanno, MM, a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy; and Michael Joseph Handy, the director of the New York City Mayor’s Office of Veteran’s Affairs. Photo: Ken Levinson

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