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Fordham’s Mission Gets a Lift

Parking Garage Construction Postponed

Catholic School Executive Leadership Dinner

Former South African Justice Links Human Rights and Education

Gun Control and the Second Amendment—An Eternal Debate

ROTC Cadets Celebrate Graduation Aboard the Intrepid

Marymount Students Participate in Regional Science Conference

McGannon Center Presents Communications Award


Fordham’s Mission Gets a Lift

This summer, the message and the mission of Fordham University can be heard in an unlikely place: at 35,000 feet above sea level. This July and August, travelers on Delta Air Lines can plug their headsets into SkyRadio to hear Joseph M. McShane, S.J., president of Fordham University, offering insight into Fordham's identity as New York City's Jesuit University.

“The interview will, I hope, enable us to share Fordham's message with a wider and larger audience than we have in the past,” said Father McShane, who recorded the interview via phone from the Rose Hill campus. “It will certainly help us achieve our goal of extending the University's public relations reach in a significant way.”

With more than 5,350 flights daily, Delta serves 4.3 million travelers a month. The University will also be identified in Delta’s in-flight magazine and a link to its homepage can be found on the airline’s website.

The segment will be rebroadcast on American Airlines, the nation’s largest carrier, as well as on Northwest Airlines, in November 2004.

— Christopher Monfette

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Parking Garage Construction Postponed

Construction on the new parking facility on the Rose Hill campus has been postponed until May 2005 in an effort to avoid disrupting two full academic years. The $30 million, 15-month project will create 1,546 additional campus parking spaces for students, faculty and visitors. The garage will be located in the southeastern quadrant of campus on the site of parking lot H.

Construction was slated to begin this summer, but finalizing financing between city, state and federal funding agencies pushed the start date back too far to ensure completion by September 2005.

— Christopher Monfette

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Catholic School Executive Leadership Dinner

Photo: Bruce Gilbert

Fordham University hosted the 10th annual Catholic School Executive Leadership Dinner in the 12th Floor Lounge on the Lincoln Center campus on May 27. Sponsored by the University’s Center for Non-Public Education, the event brought together Catholic educators from across region. Pictured here are Vincent J. Duminuco, S.J., (left) rector of the Fordham Jesuit Community and visiting professor at the Graduate School of Education, Michael J. Guerra, president of the National Catholic Education Association, (center), who accepted an award on behalf of NCEA’s contributions to Catholic education from Joseph M. McShane, S.J., (right), president of Fordham University.

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Former South African Justice Links Human Rights and Education

Education is one of the most powerful tools for advancing and protecting human rights around the world. That is according to the Hon. Richard Goldstone, who delivered an April lecture at Fordham University’s McNally Amphitheatre titled, “The Role of Education in Developing a Culture of Human Rights.”

“If oppressed people do not know their rights, they are not going to access them,” said Goldstone, a former chief prosecutor for the UN International Criminal Tribunals in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. “But if they do, then a whole new world is opened up before them.”

In addition to promoting education and training on human rights, Goldstone said that the international community must establish national human rights institutions and more effectively employ diplomatic action to punish nations that violate human rights.

Goldstone, who served on the Constitutional Court of South Africa from 1994 to 2003, pointed to the education of his countrymen that took place prior to the end of apartheid as an example of the power of education. Ongoing grassroots education of the majority black population empowered the people, and the governing minority population was educated about racism and human rights. In 1985, course materials exploring racism and apartheid were implemented into the 3rd through 12th grade curricula, and in the mid-1980s, a conference was held for more than 9,000 judges and prosecutors to teach them about human rights.

These achievements were made possible by the will of South Africans who opposed apartheid and as a result of pressure from the international community, said Goldstone. The challenge now is to keep the issue of human rights alive.

“In developed countries, human rights are taken for granted, and in developing countries they are ignored,” said Goldstone, who will serve as the William Hughes Mulligan Chair in International Legal Studies at Fordham Law School this coming fall.

Goldstone’s lecture was part of the yearlong Sapientia et Doctrina lecture series celebrating the inauguration of Joseph M. McShane, S.J., president of Fordham University.

— Michael Larkin

Gun Control and the Second Amendment—An Eternal Debate

Advocates and opponents of gun control laws have long disagreed over the interpretation of the Second Amendment. Gun control opponents have argued that the amendment protects the rights of individuals to bear arms free of regulation, while proponents argue the amendment only guarantees the collective rights of states to keep militias. And, according to Erwin Chemerinsky, a renowned constitutional law scholar, no legal interpretation of the amendment will close this rift.

“There will never be a definitive interpretation of the Second Amendment,” said Chemerinsky, a professor at the University of Southern California School of Law who spoke at an April conference hosted by the Fordham Law Review in McNally Amphitheater. “It will always be a question as to the values of society, judges and the Supreme Court.”

Chemerinsky was one of several legal scholars who participated in the daylong conference titled “The Second Amendment and the Future of Gun Regulation: Historical Legal Policy and Cultural Perspectives.”

Ultimately, he said, the U.S. Supreme Court will rule on the meaning of the Second Amendment setting the limits of gun control based on the political motivations and ideologies of the justices.

While not offering a time frame, Chemerinsky theorized that such a decision will be made sooner rather than later. The Supreme Court last ruled on a case directly related to the Second Amendment in 1939, one of only five such rulings in its history.

— Michael Larkin


ROTC Cadets Celebrate Graduation Aboard the Intrepid

Photo: Bruce Gilbert

Sixteen cadets in the New York City Officer Training Corps, 10 of them seniors from Fordham University, were commissioned on May 21 during an event at the Intrepid Sea-Air and Space Museum in Manhattan. More than 200 people attended the NYC Army ROTC 76th commissioning ceremony. The graduating cadets earned a commission as second lieutenants in the United States Army and, after four to five months of training, will either become active duty military personnel, Army reservists or National Guard members.


Marymount Students Participate in Science Conference

Marymount College students got a unique opportunity to present their scientific research to fellow students during the 58th annual Eastern Colleges Science Conference held at Manhattan College on April 3. Biology professor Carl S. Hoegler, Ph.D., and five Marymount students attended the conference, which brings together undergraduate students in the natural, physical and social sciences, through a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

“We believe that giving students the opportunity to attend and present at these conferences increases their confidence and ability to communicate ideas to fellow students with similar interests at other colleges,” said Hoegler.

Students from more than 20 universities attended the conference. Marymount students presented their research in several areas, including the effectiveness of a metabolic inhibitor on the progression of heart failure in animals and the use of neurological imaging to diagnose schizophrenia.

— John Blakeley

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McGannon Center Presents Communications Award

The Donald McGannon Communications Research Center at Fordham University has presented the 2004 Award for Social and Ethical Relevance in Communications Policy Research to Campaigning Online (Oxford University Press, 2003), by Bruce Bimber of the University of California at Santa Barbara and Richard Davis of Brigham Young University. The Policy Research Award is given annually to the most notable publication that addresses the ethical issues of communications system policies and technology.

Campaigning Online, one of more than 60 books nominated to receive the award, examines the role of the Internet in U.S. politics, with a close look at the 2000 presidential election. The book explores how candidates use the Internet as a campaign tool, whether voters tap online resources to educate themselves about issues, and whether the Internet can empower the electorate.

— John Blakeley

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