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Faculty

Members of the Executive Committee are marked with an asterisk (*).
Faculty with a joint title are marked with a ‡.

Andrew Albin, Dept. of English (PhD, Brandeis). | Late medieval English literature and culture; aural and sound culture studies; history of the senses and the body.  Selected Publications: “The Prioress’s Tale, Sonorous and Silent,” in The Chaucer Review (forthcoming). “Aural Space, Sonorous Presence, and the Performance of Christian Community in the Chester Shepherds’ Play,” Early Theatre 16.1 (2013). Current Projects: a translation with commentary of Richard Rolle's alliterative mystical treatise, Melos amoris; a monograph examining the aural phenomenon of spiritual song (canor) in late medieval England.

*‡Susanna Barsella, Dept. of Modern Languages and Literatures (PhD. Johns Hopkins ). | Medieval Italian literature; philosophy of work; patristic and medieval theology; Dante; Boccaccio; Petrarch. Selected Publications: Article on Boccaccio’s Ninfale fiesolano (forthcoming: 2013); In the Light of Angels: Dante’s Angelology and the Role of Beatrice in the Divine Comedy (2010);“Boccaccio, Petrarch, and Peter Damian: Two Models of the Humanist Intellectual,” MLN (2006); “Il lavoro nel mondo romano. L’Homo Faber ipse suae fortuna,” I Problemi della Pedagogia (2005); “The Ancient Sources of the Humanistic Idea of Work. At the Confluence of Judeo-Christian and Greek Traditions,” Memorie Domenicane (2004); “Boccaccio and Humanism. A New Patristic Source of Proemio 14 and the Pestilence: Basil the Great’s Homily on Psalm 1,” Studi sul Boccaccio (2004). Current Projects: A paper on Utility and Avarice in Poggio Bracciolini and Matteo Palmieri and one on Boccaccio: Artifice and Supernatural in Decameron.

William Baumgarth , Dept. of Political Science (PhD, Harvard). | Medieval political thought; political philosophy; Aquinas. Selected Publications: God and Creation, co-editor with Richard Regan (1994) and Aquinas: On Law, Morality, and Politics, co-editor with Richard Regan (1988).

Martin Chase, SJ, Dept. of English (PhD, Toronto ). | Old Norse; Old and Middle English; Medievalism; Myth. Selected Publications: “Framir kynnask vátta mál: The Christian Background of Einarr Skúlason’s Geisli,” in Til heiðurs og hugbótar. greinar um trúarkveðskap fyrri alda, ed. S. Óskarsdóttir and A. Guðmundsdóttir (2003); “The Refracted Beam: Einarr Skúlason’s Liturgical Theology,” in Verbal Encounters: Festschrift for Roberta Frank, ed. R. G. Poole and A. Harbus (2005); “True at Any Time: Grundtvig’s Subjective Interpretation of Nordic Myth” Nineteenth Century Literature Criticism 158 (2005); Einarr Skúlason’s Geisli: A Critical Edition (University of Toronto Press, 2005); Lilja, critical edition in Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages, vol. 7 (Brepols, 2007). On the editorial board of Tradito. Current Projects: a critical edition of the medieval Icelandic poem Siðbót.

John R. Clark, Dept. of Classics (PhD, Cornell). | Medieval Latin language and literature; Latin paleography. Selected Publications:Marsilio Ficino: Three Books on Life, ed. and trans. (reprint 1998); "Anonymous on Alchemy, Aristotle, and Creation: an Unedited Thirteenth Century Text," Traditio (2006); “Early Latin Handwriting: The Evidence of Roman Comedy,” Classical Journal (2001); “Love and Learning in the Metamorphosis Golye Episcopi,” Mittellateinisches Jahrbuch (1986). Current Projects: An article on the role of deception in Roman comedy; a Medieval Latin Reader (primarily for Classicists); a bibliography for Oxford Bibliographies Online (OBO) on Latin Palaeography.

Christopher M. Cullen, SJ, Dept. of Philosophy and Associate Director of the Center for Medieval Studies (PhD, The Catholic University of America ). | Bonaventure; Franciscan Augustinianism; Thomism; medieval metaphysics. Selected Publications:Bonaventure (Oxford, 2006); Maritain and America, co-ed. (CUA, 2009); “The Philosophical Method of St. Bonaventure,” in Companion to Bonaventure (Brill, 2012); “Bonaventure on Nature before Grace,” American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly (2010); “Community, Religion, and Virtue in Modern Liberal Democracies,” in Die fragile Demokratie–The Fragility of Democracy (Verlag Duncker & Humblot, 2007); “John Peckham,” Encyclopedia of British Philosophy (Continuum, 2006); “Alexander of Hales,” in Blackwell Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages (2003); “Scholastic Hylomorphism and Western Art: From the Gothic to the Baroque,” in Beauty, Art, and the Polis (CUA, 2000); “Transcendental Thomism: Realism Rejected,” in The Failure of Modernism (CUA, 1999).Current Projects: The Metaphysics of Aquinas: Theological and Philosophical Perspectives, co-ed. The Semiotic Metaphysics of Bonaventure.

Brian Davies, OP, Dept. of Philosophy (PhD, London ). | Philosophy of religion; Aquinas; Anselm. Selected Publications: The Thought of Thomas Aquinas (1992); Philosophy of Religion: A Guide and Anthology (2000); Aquinas (2002); An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion (3rd edn., 2003); an edition of Aquinas's De Malo, co-ed. with R. Regan (2003); The Cambridge Companion to Anselm, co-ed. with B. Leftow (2004); Thomas Aquinas on God and Evil (2011); with E. Stump, The Oxford Handbook of Thomas Aquinas (2011). book review editor of International Philosophy Quarterly; on the editorial board of Religious Studies; General Editor of Oxford University Press's series “Great Medieval Thinkers.”

Robert Davis, Dept. of Theology (PhD, Harvard). | Medieval Christian thought; mysticism and spiritual practices; Neoplatonism; Bonaventure; medieval women’s religious writing. Current Projects: “Grammar After Nature: Knowledge, Sense-Perception, and the Liberal Arts in John of Salisbury’s Metalogicon”; a monograph on affectivity and ecstasis in the writings of Bonaventure.

George E. Demacopoulos, Dept. of Theology (PhD, Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill). | Late-Ancient and Medieval Christian History; East and West; spiritual direction; asceticism; institutional authority. Selected Publications: Five Models of Spiritual Direction in the Early Church (University of Notre Dame Press, 2007); Orthodox Readings of Augustine, ed. (SVS Press, 2008) Gregory the Great Book of Pastoral Rule, trans. (SVS Press, 2008). Current Projects: The Invention of Peter:  The Development and Reception of the Petrine Discourse at the End of Late Antiquity (under review); Gregory the Great: Pastor, Diplomat, and Steward of St. Peter (in progress); Orthodox Constructions of the West, ed. (in progress).

*Mary Erler, Dept. of English (PhD, Chicago). | Medieval drama; early printing; women’s reading and book ownership. Selected Publications: Robert Copland: Poems, ed. (1993); Poems of Cupid, God of Love, co-ed. with Thelma Fenster (1991); “Devotional Literature,” in Cambridge History of the Book in Britain, Vol. 3 1400-1557, eds. L. Hellinga and J. B. Trapp (1999); Gendering the Master Narrative, co-ed. with Maryanne Kowaleski (2003); Women, Reading and Piety in Late Medieval England (2002); Records of Early English Drama: Ecclesiastical London (2008).  Co-editor of Fordham Series in Medieval Studies. Current Projects:A volume of London ecclesiastical drama records for the Records of Early English Drama (REED) series and a study of the ownership and provenance of London chronicle manuscripts.

Richard F. Gyug, Dept. of History (PhD, Toronto). | Medieval liturgy; religion and society; codicology; Spain and Italy. Selected Publications: Missale ragusinum: The Missal of Dubrovnik (1990); The Diocese of Barcelona During the Black Death: The Register ‘Notule communium’ 15 (1994); ed., Medieval Cultures in Contact (2003); co-editor with Kathleen G. Cushing, Ritual, Text and Law: Studies in Medieval Canon Law and Liturgy presented to Roger E. Reynolds (2004); most recently: “Bibles, Biblical Books, and the Monastic Liturgy in the Early Middle Ages,” in The Practice of the Bible in the Middle Ages: Production, Reception, and Performance in Western Christianity, ed. Susan Boynton and Diane J. Reilly (2011); and editor with Roger Reynolds of the series “Monumenta liturgica beneventana.” Current Projects:An edition and study of a liturgical-legal manuscript from Kotor in southern Dalmatia, preparation of a handlist of the Compactiones fond of Montecassino, and participation in a teaching consortium on Pilgrimage Studies.

*Susanne Hafner, Dept. of Modern Languages and Literatures, German (Ph.D, Universität Hamburg). | Medieval German literature and culture; Arthurian literature; codicology; gender. Selected Publications:  Maskulinität in der höfischen Erzählliteratur (2004); “Of Monsters and Men: The Power of Female Imagination in Les Quatre Sohais Saint-Martin,” in Comic Provocations: Exposing the Corpus of Old French Fabliaux, ed. H. A. Crocker (2006); “Erzählen im Raum: Der Schmalkaldener Iwein,” in Visualisierungsstrategien in mittelalterlichen Bildern und Texten, ed. H. Wenzel and C. S. Jaeger (2006). Current Projects:  a monograph on Virgilian Masculinities: Medieval Readings of the Aeneid, an article on the Middle English Sir Percival of Gales: “He ne wiste nother of evyll ne gude: A Prelapsarian Perceval,”  and an article on Abbot Ellinger of Tegernsee and his autographs. See article on Dr. Hafner's research from Inside Fordham

Franklin T. Harkins, Dept. of Theology (PhD, University of Notre Dame). | Scholastic theology, particularly the Victorines, the Sentences of Peter Lombard, and the Sentences tradition; medieval exegesis; history of Jewish-Christian relations. Selected Publications:Reading and the Work of Restoration: History and Scripture in the Theology of Hugh of St. Victor (PIMS, 2009); Transforming Relations: Essays on Jews and Christians throughout History in Honor of Michael A. Signer (Univ. of Notre Dame Press, 2010); “The Embodiment of Angels: A Debate in Mid-Thirteenth-Century Theology,” Recherches de théologie et philosophie médiévales 78 (2011). Co-editor of the Fordham Series in Medieval Studies. Current Projects:Co-editing with F. van Liere Scriptural Interpretation: Theory, vol. 3 in the Victorine Texts in Translation series (forthcoming: Brepols, 2012); Filia Magistri, a thirteenth-century abridgment of Peter Lombard’s Sentences, ed. and trans. (forthcoming: Peeters Press, 2013). See article on Dr. Harkins' research from Inside Fordham

J. Patrick Hornbeck, Dept. of Theology (DPhil, Oxford). | Heresy and orthodoxy in late medieval England and France; Lollardy and Catharism; the Reformation; dissenting movements in the history of Western Christianity; affiliation, identity, and deconversion in contemporary Roman Catholicism. Selected Publications: What Is a Lollard? Dissent and Belief in Late Medieval England (Oxford University Press, 2010); Wycliffite Controversies, ed. (forthcoming: Brepols, 2011); Wycliffite Spirituality, ed. and trans. (forthcoming: Paulist Press, 2012); “Deconversion in Roman Catholicism: Mapping a Fertile Field,” American Catholic Studies 122:2 (2011). Current Projects: A Companion to Lollardy (Brill); an online edition of John Wyclif’s Latin works; articles on baptism and confirmation in lollard writings, on the education of John Calvin and Ignatius of Loyola, and on deconversion and ordinary theology. See an article from Inside Fordham on Dr. Hornbeck's research, and an article by him on the "Top 10 Heresies".

Javier Jimenez-Belmonte, Dept. of Modern Languages and Literatures (PhD, Columbia ). | Medieval and early modern Spanish literature. Selected Publications: Las 'Obras en Verso' del Príncipe de Esquilache: Amateurismo y Conciencia Literaria (Boydell & Brewer, 2007); “Amistad y novela sentimental: ‘Bien amar’ al amigo en ‘Siervo libre de amor,’” Bulletin of Hispanic Studies (2002); “History of a Bite: Cleopatra in 13th Century Castile,” La Corónica (2011); “Historiar el Oriente: Cleopatra en la historiografía española el XVI,” eHumanista (2011); “Monstruos de ida y vuelta: gitanos y caníbales en la máquina antropológica barroca,” Hispanic Review (2011). Current Projects: A study of the rhetorical and moral uses of the figure and history of Cleopatra by Spanish poets, historiographers and visual artists from 1200 to 1800. A study of the role of nobility in the constitution of the Spanish post-baroque literary field.

Gyula Klima, Dept. of Philosophy (PhD, Lóránd Eötvös, Budapest ). | Logic and Metaphysics; Anselm; Aquinas; Ockham; Buridan. Selected Publications:Ars Artium: Essays in Philosophical Semantics, Medieval and Modern (1988); John Buridan: Summulae de Dialectica, an annotated translation with a philosophical introduction, trans.(2001); Medieval Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary (Blackwell, 2007); John Buridan (Oxford University Press, 2009); Editor of Proceedings of the Society for Medieval Logic and Metaphysics, 9 vols. (2001-2009). Current Projects:John Buridan’s Questions on the Soul, a critical edition with an annotated translation and critical and interpretive essays, 4 vols. (Fordham University Press); Intentionality, Cognition and Mental Representation in Medieval Philosophy (Fordham University Press); Medieval Philosophy: A Systematic Survey for the 21st Century (Continuum Publishers).

Joseph Koterski, SJ, Dept. of Philosophy (PhD, St. Louis ). | Medieval philosophy; natural law ethics; Thomistic metaphysics; Dante. Selected Publications: An Introduction to Medieval Philosophy: Basic Concepts (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009); Medieval Education, co-ed. with R. Begley, (2005); “The Doctrine of Participation in Aquinas’s Commentary on St. John,” in Being and Thought in Aquinas, ed. J. Hackett and W. Murnion(2004); “Boethius and the Theological Origins of the Concept of Person,” American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly (2004); “Thomas More on Conscience” in Thomas More: Selected Writings, ed. J. F. Thornton and S. B. Varenne (2003); “Karl Jaspers on Philosophy of Religion: His Treatment of Anselm and Cusa,” in Karl Jaspers on the History of Philosophy and Philosophy of History, ed. J. Koterski and R. Langley(2003). Editor-in-chief of International Philosophy Quarterly. Current Projects: Videotaped lecture-courses for The Teaching Company on Aristotelian Ethics, Natural Law and Human Nature, and most recently on Biblical Wisdom Literature.

Maryanne Kowaleski, Dept. of History (PhD, Toronto ) | Economic and social history; women and family; urban and maritime history; England Selected Publications: Medieval Towns: A Reader (2005);  Medieval Domesticity: Home, Housing, and Household in Medieval England (Cambridge, 2008), co-ed.; Local Markets and Regional Trade in Medieval Exeter (Cambridge, 1995); ed., The Havener’s Accounts of the Earldom and Duchy of Cornwall, 1287-1356 (2001); Women and Power in the Middle Ages, co-ed. with M. Erler (1988); and articles on demography, women and work, urban families, shipping, mariners, and marine fisheries; on the editorial board of Speculum. Current Projects:an article on “Gender, Gossip, and the Economy in Late Medieval England,” and a book study, “Living from the Sea: An Ethnography of Maritime Communities in Medieval England.”

Kathryn Kueny, Dept. of Theology (PhD, Chicago). | Qur’anic studies; medieval Islamic law, literature, and exegesis; Abrahamic traditions. Selected Publications: Conceiving Identities: Maternity in Medieval Muslim Discourse and Practice (forthcoming: SUNY Press, 2012); The Rhetoric of Sobriety: Wine in Early Islam (2001); “Reproducing Power: Qur’ānic Anthropogonies in Comparison,” in The Lineaments of Islam: Studies in Honor of Fred McGraw Donner, ed. P. M. Cobb (forthcoming: E. J. Brill, 2012); “The Birth of Cain: Reproduction, Maternal Responsibility, and Moral Character in Early Islamic Exegesis,” The History of Religions 48, 2 (2008). Current Projects:A monograph on how medieval Muslim medicine, both traditional and non-traditional, charts an ethical understanding of human life. See article on Dr. Kueny from Inside Fordham.

Joseph T. Lienhard, SJ, Dept. of Theology (Dr Theol Habil, Freiburg ). | Patristics. Selected Publications: The Bible, the Church, and Authority: The Canon of the Christian Bible in History and Theology (1995); Origen: Homilies on Luke; Fragments on Luke, trans. (1996); Contra Marcellum: Marcellus of Ancyra and Fourth-Century Theology (1999); Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy. Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture, ed. (2001; trans. into Italian, Spanish, Russian and Chinese). Managing editor of the journal, Traditio. Current Projects: A book, “Theology in the Age of the Fathers,” with Kenneth B. Steinhauser and Robin Darling Young.

Susanna McFadden, Dept of Art and Music History (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania). Art, architecture, and archaeology of Late Antiquity; monumental wall paintings of the Mediterranean region; early medieval Islamic art. Selected Publications: "The 'Art' of Maintaining an Empire: Roman Paintings in the Temple of Luxor," ed. (forthcoming: ARCE/Yale University Press Conservation Series); "Art on the Edge: The Late Roman Wall Paintings of Amheida, Egypt,” forthcoming in Atti di XI Colloquio Internazionale dell'Associazione Internazionale per la Pittura Murale Antica. Current Projects: Art Historian for NYU's Excavations at Amheida, Egypt. See article on Dr. McFadden from Inside Fordham.

Wolfgang P. Mueller, Dept. of History (PhD, Syracuse ; Dr Phil Habil, Augsburg ). | Medieval legal and ecclesiastical history; canon law; scholasticism. Selected Publications: Huguccio: The Life, Works, and Thought of a Twelfth-Century Jurist (1994); The Criminalization of Abortion in the West (2012). Current Projects:A series of essays on the workings of ecclesiastical courts in the Middle Ages, one of which will be published soon in The Cambridge History of Medieval Canon Law, edited by Anders Winroth and John Wei. See Dr. Mueller's website

Alex J. Novikoff, Dept. of History (Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania).| Medieval Intellectual and Cultural History; Scholasticism, Jewish-Christian-Muslim Relations; Historiography; Musicology. Selected Publications: The Medieval Culture of Disputation: Pedagogy, Practice, and Performance University of Pennsylvania Press (2013); “Toward a Cultural History of Scholastic Disputation,”American Historical Review (2012); “Anselm, Dialogue, and the Rise of Scholastic Disputation,” Speculum (2011); “The Middle Ages,” in Antisemitism: A History, ed. Richard Levy and Albert Lindemann (2010); “Licit and Illicit in the Rhetoric of the Investiture Conflict,” in Law and the Illicit in Medieval Europe, ed. Ruth Mazo Karras, E. Ann Matter, and Joel Kaye (2008); “Between Tolerance and Intolerance in Medieval Spain: An Historio-graphic Enigma,” Medieval Encounters (2005); “The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century Before Haskins,” Haskins Society Journal (2005). Current Projects: A source reader on the twelfth-century renaissance, dialogue and disputation in the medieval Mediterranean, the culture and performance of scholasticism, c. 1100-1600.

*Thomas O'Donnell, Dept. of English (PhD, UCLA). | Literature in Britain and France, 1000-1350; medieval Latin; religious and community writing; history of form; material culture. Selected Publications: “European Literature and Eleventh-Century England,” co-authored with M. Townsend and E. Tyler, in The Cambridge History of Early Medieval English Literature (forthcoming); “‘The Ladies Have Made Me Quite Fat’: Authors and Patrons at Barking Abbey,” in Barking Abbey and Its Texts, ed. D. A. Bussell and J. N. Brown (forthcoming); “Anglo-Norman Multilingualism and Continental Standards in Guernes de Pont-Sainte-Maxence's Vie de Saint Thomas,” in Conceptualizing Multilingualism in England, 800-1250, ed. E. Tyler (2011). Current Projects:“The Old English Durham, the Historia de Sancto Cuthberto and the Unreformed in Anglo-Saxon Literature”; “Saint Wulfstan, European Culture, and the Myth of Anglo-Saxon Worcester”; a book, The Theoretical Life, that explores experimental writing and communal subjectivity in English monasteries, 1000-1300.

*Nicholas Paul, Dept. of History (PhD, Cambridge ). | Courtly culture and society in high medieval Europe ; historiography, narrative, and social memory; perceptions of the past and commemorative practices; crusading and family tradition. Selected Publications: “Crusade, Memory, and Regional Politics in Twelfth-Century Amboise,” Journal of Medieval History (2005); “The Chronicle of Fulk le Réchin: a Reassessment,” The Haskins Society Journal (2006); "Warlord's Wisdom: Literacy and Propaganda at the Time of the First Crusade," Speculum (2010); Remembering the Crusades: Myth, Image, and Identity, co-ed. with S.Yeager (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012); To Follow in Their Footsteps: Family Memory and the Early Crusades (Cornell University Press, 2012) Current Projects:"Origo consulum: Murder, Memory, and the Legendary Origins of the Counts of Anjou"; "Lion Knights: Chivalry, Monarchy, and the Twilight of Twelfth-Century Crusading Memory." See article on Dr. Paul's research from Inside Fordham

*Giorgio Pini, Dept. of Philosophy (PhD, Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa , Italy ). | Medieval philosophy; late medieval intellectual history; Henry of Ghent; Giles of Rome; Duns Scotus. Selected Publications: Categories and Logic in Duns Scotus (2002); “Scotus on Doing Metaphysics in statu isto,” in John Duns Scotus, Philosopher, ed. M. B. Ingham and O. Bychkov (Aschendorff Verlag, 2010); “Can God Create my Thoughts? Scotus’s Case against the Causal Account of Intentionality,” The Journal of the History of Philosophy, vol.49, no. 1 (2011); “The Development of Aquinas’s Thinking,” in Oxford Handbook to Aquinas, ed. by Brian Davies and E. Stump (forthcoming, Oxford). On the editorial board of Traditio. Current Projects: A critical edition of the recently discovered Notabilia super Metaphysicam by Duns Scotus; a study of theories of cognition in the later Middle Ages.

Brian J. Reilly, Dept. of Modern Languages and Literatures, French (Ph.D. Yale). | Old French language and literature; science and literature. Selected Publications: “Chrétien de Troyes’s Gettier Problem: Cligès lines 2048-89,” Romance Notes (2013); “Virtuous Circles for Authorship Attribution through Quantitative Analysis: Chrétien de Troyes’s Lancelot,” [Co-authored with Moi-ra R. Dillon.] Digital Philology (2013). Current Projects: A book project on color in Old French literature; an article on manuscript variation and its interac-tions with the reception of irony.

Nina Rowe, Dept. of Art History and Music (PhD, Northwestern University). | High and late medieval art history in France and Germany; Christian-Jewish relations; modern medievalism. Selected Publications: The Jew, the Cathedral, and the Medieval City: Synagoga and Ecclesia in the Thirteenth Century (Cambridge UP, 2011); editor, Medieval Art History Today – Critical Terms, special issue of Studies in Iconography 33 (2012); Excavating the Medieval Image: Manuscripts, Artists, Audiences, co-ed. (Ashgate, 2004); Manuscript Illumination in the Modern Age: Recovery and Reconstruction, co-author and ed. (Block Museum, 2001); “Pocket Crucifixions: Jesus, Jews and Ownership in Fourteenth-Century Ivories,” Studies in Iconography (2011); “Rethinking Ecclesia and Synagoga in the Thirteenth Century,” in Gothic, Art & Thought in the Later Medieval Period: Essays in Honor of Willibald Sauerländer, ed. C. Hourihane (Penn State UP, 2011); “Idealization and Subjection at the South Porch of Strasbourg Cathedral,” in Beyond the Yellow Badge: Anti-Judaism and Antisemitism in Medieval and Early Modern Visual Culture, ed. M. Merback (Brill, 2008); “Synagoga Tumbles, a Rider Triumphs: Clerical Viewers and the Fürstenportal of Bamberg Cathedral,” Gesta (2006) (winner of the 2008 Van Courtlandt Elliott Prize, Medieval Academy of America). Current Projects:Essay on the concept of “Detail” for the Art Bulletin, “Notes from the Field” series; article on images of children in the Holkham Bible Picture Book, an illuminated manuscript from fourteenth-century London. See an article from Inside Fordham about Dr. Rowe's involvement in Art Fridays at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

Cristiana Sogno, Dept. of Classical Languages and Literature (Ph. D. Yale). | Roman history, Latin literature, Roman law, Latin Epigraphy, Latin Paleography. Selected Publications: From the Tetrarchs to the Theodosians: Later Roman History and Culture, 284-450 AD, ed. with S. McGill and E. Watts (Cambridge, 2010); “Petite Poésie Portable: The Latin Cento in Its Late Antique Context,” co-authored with M. Formisano, in Condensed Texts – Condensing Texts, ed. M. Horster and C. Reitz (Stuttgart, 2010); “Lucius’s Triad of Passions: Curiosity, Pleasure, and the Quest of Fame Through Story-Telling,” in Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (forthcoming); “Curiositas nihil recusat: A Playful Defense of “Low” Biography against “High” History,” in Shifting Cultural Frontiers in Late Antiquity, ed. D. Brakke, D. M. Deliyannis and E. Watts (forthcoming 2012). Current Projects:a book project on curiosity in antiquity; translation and historical-literary commentary on the orations of Symmachus and on Symmachus’s and Ambrose’s writings about the Altar of Victory (in collaboration with Dr. M. Formisano).

*Maureen A. Tilley, Dept. of Theology (Ph.D, Duke Univ. ) | North African Christianity; early Christian lifestyles and literature; history of biblical interpretation.   Selected Publications: "The Christian Imperial Period: Diocletian to the Vandals" in Devotion, Discipline and Dissent: The Practice of Christianity in North Africa, ed. J. P. Burns, Jr. and R. M. Jensen (forthcoming: Eerdmans, 2012); "Redefining Donatism: Moving Forward," Augustinian Studies (2011); "One, Wholly, Catholic: Saints and Sanctity in the Post-Apostolic Church," Proceedings of the Catholic Theological Society of America, 66 (2011); “From Schism to Heresy in Late Antiquity: Developing Doctrinal Deviance in the Wounded Body of Christ,” Journal of Early Christian Studies 15 (2007); “Mary in Roman Africa: Evidence for her Cultus,” Studia Patristica 39 (2006); “Regional Varieties of Christianity in the First Three Centuries: North Africa” in The Cambridge History of Early Christianity (2006). Current Projects:Translations of Augustine’s anti-Donatist works for Augustine for the 21 st Century. See an article from Inside Fordham on Dr. Tilley's research.

Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Dept. of English (PhD, Liverpool). | Anglo-norman literature; hagiography; medieval women's writing. Selected Publications: Matthew Paris: The Life of St Alban, co-trans. and intro.(2010); Language and Culture in Medieval Britain: The French of England, c. 1100-c. 1500, ed.(2009); Matthew Paris: The History of St Edward the King, co-trans.(2008); Women, Households and Christianities in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, co-ed. (2005); Guidance for Women in Twelfth Century Convents (2004, paperback 2012); Saints' Lives and Women's Literary Culture: Virginity and its Authorizations (2001); Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain, co-ed. (2000); The Idea of the Vernacular: Middle English Literary Theory 1280-1520 (1999). Co-editor of French of England Translation Series; formerly General Editor of York Medieval Press. Current Projects:Rethinking the South English Legendaries (forthcoming: Manchester University Press, 2011); “The French of England: Vernacular Literary Theory and Practices, c. 1130-1450,” a collaborative research project.

*‡Suzanne M. Yeager, Dept. of English (PhD, Toronto ). | Middle English literature; pilgrimage and crusade narrative; medieval romance. Selected Publications: Jerusalem in Medieval Narrative (Cambridge, 2008); Remembering the Crusades: Myth, Image, and Identity, co-ed.(Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012); “Jewish Identity in The Siege of Jerusalem and Homiletic Texts: Models of Penance and Victims of Vengeance for the Urban Apocalypse,” Medium Aevum LXXX (2011); and articles on premodern community formation and travel. Current Projects:“Fictions of Espionage: Performing Pilgrim and Crusader Identities in the Age of Chaucer,” in The Oxford Handbook to Chaucer, ed. S. C. Akbari (forthcoming OUP, 2012); “Racial Imagination and the Theatre of War: Captivity and Execution in the Imaginative Literature of the Premodern Period,” The Blackwell Companion to British Literature (forthcoming, Blackwell, 2012); and a new book project on late medieval pilgrimage, public performance, and the imagined East.



Affiliated Faculty

Thelma Fenster, Dept. of Modern Languages and Literatures, Professor Emerita (PhD, Texas , Austin ). | Old and Middle French language and literature, including Anglo-Norman; Christine de Pizan. Selected Publications: Arthurian Women: A Casebook (repr. 2000); translations with Jocelyn Wogan-Browne of Matthew Paris's History of Saint Edward the King; Paris's Life of St. Alban. Co-editor of the French of England Translation Series. Current Projects:New editions and translations of Christine de Pizan's Epistre au dieu d'Amours and Dit de la Rose, with up-to-date critical essay; with co-editors Jocelyn Wogan-Browne and Delbert Russell ; an anthology of texts in the “The French of England.”

Maris G. Fiondella, Dept. of English, Professor Emerita (PhD, Fordham). | Medieval western drama/theatre; Japanese Noh drama; Augustine. Selected Publications: "The Conversion of the Sign in the Towneley Passion Plays," in New Approaches to Medieval Textuality, ed. M. Ledgerwood (1998); "Derrida, Typology, and The Second Shepherds' Play," Exemplaria 6 (1994). Current Projects:A study of sexual symbolism in St. Augustine's language-theory; an article on theatrical signs (e.g. costume, gesture) and eucharistic theology in the Fleury Easter plays.

Joel A. Herschman, Dept. of Art History and Music, Professor Emeritus (PhD, Institute of Fine Arts , NYU). | Medieval architecture; history of technology; history of photography. Selected Publications: Co-author with R. Mark, Architectural Technology up to the Scientific Revolution (1993); co-author with C. Robinson Architecture Transformed, A History of the Photographing of Building (1987, 1988, 1990); “The Norman Ambulatory of Le Mans and the Chevey of the Cathedral of Coutances,” Gesta (1981). Current Projects: A book on the abbey church at Jumieges with James Moranstern, forthcoming in the series Monuments Historiques de France.

Erick Kelemen, Center for Teaching Excellence (PhD. Delaware) | Chaucer and Middle English literature; textual criticism; medieval drama; pedagogy. Selected Publications: Textual Editing and Criticism: an Introduction (2008). Current Projects: a book-length study, Bad Chaucer: Readings in Rejected Versions of The Canterbury Tales, and an article on cladistic analysis of the manuscript and early print tradition of Chaucer's lyrics.

John Ryle Kezel, Director of the Saint Edmund Campion Institute For the Advancement of Intellectual Excellence and Director of the Office of Prestigious Fellowships (PhD, Fordham). | Old English language and literature; Gothic language and literature; Old Norse language and literature; Benedictine and Franciscan studies. Selected Publications: “Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary” in New Catholic Encyclopedia Supplement (2010); “Priests, Prophets, and Kings: Ecclesiology in Newman and Tolkien.” Member of the Board of Directors of Flax Trust/USA. Current Projects:Two books, The Franciscan Crown: A Medieval Devotion and Reading the Rood: An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon Language, Literature, and Studies, as well as assisting the Smithsonian Institution with cataloguing and studying their rosary and medal collections. Transcript of his address at the Newman Beatification Conference sponsored by the Tau Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa and The Spiritual Family: The Work on October 23, 2010.

Laura K. Morreale, Medieval Studies (PhD Fordham). Italian municipal historiography; Chronicles and material culture, the French of Italy, the French of Outremer. Selected Publications: "French Literature, Florentine Politics, and Vernacular Historical Writing, 1270-1350," Speculum (2011); Martin da Canal, Les Estoires de Venise, translation and commentary, Unipress (2009). Current projects: an article on French diplomatic texts from the Hospitallers; a report on materialism in Northern Italian chronicles. She is editor of The French of Italy and French of Outremer websites, and a frequent contributor to The Ultimate History Project.

Astrid M. O’Brien, Dept. of Philosophy Emerita (PhD, Fordham). | Medieval philosophy; natural theology; mystical tradition.Selected Publications: The Meaning of Resolution as a Reflective Method in the Philosophy of Thomas Aquinas (Fordham Library Digital Research Collection); A Mysticism of Kindness: The Biography of “Lucie Christine” (Scranton, 2010); "Lucie Christine: Nineteenth Century Wife, Mother and Mystic," in Mapping the Catholic Cultural Landscape, ed. P.J. Miller and R. Fossey(2004); “Contemplation Along the Roads of the World: The Reflections of Raissa and Jacques Maritain,” in Lay Sanctity: Medieval and Modern, ed. A. Astell (2000); a new preface to a new edition of  the Journal Spirituel de Lucie Christine, ed. A Poulain, S. J.(1999); “Raissa’s Hasidic-Catholic Spirituality” in: Jacques Maritain and the Jews, ed. R. Royal (1994); “A Note on the Translations” in Sigrid Undset on Saints and Sinners, ed. D. Hudson (1993); “Metaphysics as a Spiritual Journey,” in Conflict and Community, New Studies in Thomistic Thought, ed. M. Lukens (1992); “Platonic vs. Aristotelian Perceptions of the Church , ” The Journal of Religion and Psychical Research (1988).

Joseph O’Callaghan, Joseph F. O’Callaghan, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of History (PhD, Fordham). | Medieval Spain ; medieval kingship and parliaments. Selected Publications: The Gibraltar Crusade: Castile and the Battle for the Strait (2011); Electing Our Bishops: How the Catholic Church Should Choose Its Leaders (2007); Reconquest and Crusade in Medieval Spain (2003); Alfonso X and the Cantigas de Santa Maria: A Poetic Biography (1998); Alfonso X, the Cortes, and Government in Medieval Spain (1998); The Learned King: The Reign of Alfonso X of Castile (1993); The Cortes of Castile-León, 1188-1350 (1989); The Spanish Military Order of Calatrava and its Affiliates (1975); A History of Medieval Spain (1975); The Latin Chronicle of the Kings of Castile, trans.(2002); The Autobiography of St. Ignatius Loyola, trans. (1992). Editorial board of En La España Medieval; a former Director of the Center for Medieval Studies at Fordham and a past president of the American Catholic Historical Association. He is anHonorary Associate of the Sociedad Española de Estudios Medievales. Current Projects: A monograph, The Last Crusade in the West: Castile and the Conquest of Granada.; he is an Honorary Associate of the Sociedad Española de Estudios Medievales, a former Director of the Center for Medieval Studies at Fordham, and a past president of the American Catholic Historical Association.

Marilyn Oliva, Center for Medieval Studies (PhD, Fordham). | Women, religion, England, travel in the Middle Ages. Selected Publications: The Convent and the Community in Late Medieval England (1998); “The French of England in Female Convents: The French Kitcheners’ Accounts of Campsey Ash Priory,” in Language and Culture in Medieval Britain, ed. Jocelyn Wogan-Browne (2009); “Nuns at Home: The Domesticity of Sacred Space,” in Medieval Domesticity: Home, Housing and Household in Medieval England, eds. M. Kowaleski and P.J.P. Goldberg (2008); “Rendering Accounts: The Pragmatic Literacy of Late Medieval English Nuns,” in Nuns’ Literacies in Medieval Europe, eds. V. O’Mara, P. Stoop and V. Blanton (forthcoming: Brepols). Current Projects: essay on Chaucer’s Nun’s Priest, and an analysis of household accounts from medieval English female convents.

Elizabeth Parker, Dept. of Art History and Music, Professor Emerita (PhD, Inst. of Fine Arts, NYU). | Romanesque art in England and Italy ; Byzantine art; Gothic art; medieval art and liturgy; women and art . Selected Publications: The Descent From the Cross: Its Relation to the Extra-Liturgical ‘Depositio’ Drama (1978); The Cloisters Cross: Its Art and Meaning, co-author with C.T. Little (1994); "Architecture and Liturgy," in The Liturgy of the Medieval Church (repr. 2004); “The Gift of the Cross in the Liber Vitae,” in Reading Medieval Images: The Art Historian and the Object, ed. E. Sears and T.K. Thomas (2002); “Editing the Cloisters Cross,” Gesta (2006); “Modes of Seeing Margaret of Antioch at Fornovo di Taro,” in The Four Modes of Seeing: Approaches to Medieval Imagery in Honor of Madeline Harrison Caviness, ed. E. S. Lane, E. Pastan, and E.M. Shortell (2008). Former editor of Gesta and Traditio; on the editorial board of TEAMS. Current Projects: Antelami’s Deposition in Parma Cathedral.

Louis B. Pascoe, SJ, Dept. of History, Professor Emeritus (PhD, UCLA). | Ecclesiastical and intellectual history; reform ideologies; universities; church and state. Selected Publications: Jean Gerson: Principles of Church Reform (1973); “Pierre d'Ailly: Histoire, Schisme et Antéchrist," in Genèse et débuts du Grand Schisme d'Occident, ed J. Favier (1980); “Religious  Orders, Evangelical Liberty, and Reform in the Thought of Jean Gerson," in Reformbemühungen und Observanzbestrebungen in spätmittelalterlichen Ordenswesen, ed. K. Elm (1989); Church and Reform: Bishops, Theologians, and Canon Lawyers in the Thought of Pierre d'Ailly (2005),"Gerhart Ladner's The Idea of Reform: Reflections on Terminology and Ideology," (forthcoming);  "Pierre d'Ailly and Jean Gerson: Theological Continuity and Reform at Paris (forthcoming). Current Projects:study of Christian Anthropology, Ascetical Theology, and Personal Reform in Pierre d'Ailly.

George W. Shea, Dept. of Classics Emeritus (PhD, Columbia ). | Latin poetry; Late Latin. Selected Publications:The Poems of Alcimus Ecdicius Avitus (1997); The Iohannis of Flavius Cresconius Corippus (1998); Delia and Nemesis, The Elegies of Albius Tibullus (1998). Current Projects: A commentary on the Iohannis of Corippus.

Gregory Waldrop, SJ, Executive Director of University Art Collections (PhD, Berkeley). | Late medieval and Renaissance art history of Italy; Sienese painting; clerical culture and iconography; late medieval female mystics. Current Projects: editing a book on sacerdotal iconography, with a focus on images of Catherine of Siena and her confessor the Dominican friar Raymond of Capua; preparing a chapter on visual representations of the biblical figure of Job for a companion series volume on the reception of Job in the Middle Ages. See article on Fr. Waldrop from Inside Fordham: 2011, 2012

 



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