Crossing on SS Normandie: Paris to New York Between the Wars
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The Ship


In 1935, SS Normandie embarked on its maiden voyage from Le Havre to New York. Intended by the Compagnie Générale Transatlantique to be the finest example of the Art Deco style, so fashionable during the interwar period, Normandie blended form with function to an extent unmatched by any previous liner. More than just a ship, however, Normandie provided a tangible link between the opposite coasts of the Atlantic. Similarly, Normandie, being the most glamorous, most fashionable, most modern ship crossing the ocean, came to epitomize this golden age of decadent, albeit ironic, luxury at sea, refusing to acknowledge the crashing wave of economic tempest presently engulfing the West. Normandie boasted an innovative hull design, a turboelectric turbine system, a unique exhaust uptake, a streamlined exterior structure, original works of art from leading artists of the day, and an air-conditioned first-class dining room.


Essays

Entrance, Eating, and Interior Interaction
by Brian Flannery


Luxury in First Class Accommodations
by Brian Flannery

Activity and Leisure
by Brian Flannery

Normandie: Idleness and Conversion
by Brian Flannery

Hooked on Speed: What Made Normandie Go?
by Mario Weddell

The Art of Structure
by Mario Weddell

A Tale of Two Ships
by Mario Weddell

Birth of a Beauty
by Mario Weddell



    The Team
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