Online Summer Session

Courses run asynchronously and are conducted exclusively within Fordham University's online learning space, Fordham Blackboard, between May 30 and August 8. Visitors must register by May 12 to ensure timely receipt of login materials. All students must log into the course and check for assignments on May 30.

Fordham students (FCRH, FCLC, GSB) should refer to the registration policies here for more information.

Courses

Writing for Online Media
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

An exploration of the theory and practice of electronic writing, writing for websites and blogs, nonlinear and multidimensional computer-based documents, and the linking and networking of text and other media.

Course Number: DTEM 2471 PW1, CRN: 10014
Instructor: Strate
4 credits


Statistics I
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

The primary objective of this course is to develop an understanding of elementary statistical theories and concepts. This course has a prerequisite of one semester of Calculus and/or Finite Mathematics. The examples used throughout the lectures will be geared toward economic and business thinking.

Course Number: ECON 2140 PW1, CRN: 10005
Instructor: Migliaccio
4 credits


Statistical Decision Making
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

This course develops the student's ability to collect data, postulate a hypothesis or a model, select the appropriate statistical technique, analyze the data using statistical software, draw correct statistical inferences, and clearly summarize the findings. Specific topics include chi-squares, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression and correlation models, time series analysis, and quality control. (Prereq: Statistics I)

Course Number: ECON 2142 PW1, CRN: 10006
Instructor: Burke
4 credits


Texts and Contexts: Self-Made Men and Women in 19th Century American Fiction
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

This course will focus on the evolution and cultural significance of the notion of "self-making" in nineteenth-century American literature. We will study the figure of the self-made man through the writing of authors such as Horatio Alger, Frederick Douglass, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and William Dean Howells while also considering the prospect of self-made womanhood as articulated by authors including Emma May Buckingham, Louisa May Alcott, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps. Through close reading, analytical writing, and online discussion forms we will work together to develop an understanding of the relationship between self-making and nation-making and to investigate the role played by gender in the development of cultural ideals.

Course Number: ENGL 2000 PW1, CLOSED
Instructor: Cosacchi
3 credits


Understanding Historical Change: American History
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

A course focusing on significant periods in the development of the United States and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.

Course Number: HIST 1100 PW1, CRN: 10004
Instructor: Gauthier
3 credits


Principles of Management
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

Special emphasis on the role of the first-line supervisor in balancing, coordinating, and integrating individual and organizational needs. Subjects covered are the development of management thought, the supervisor as a decision-maker, and the process of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling organizational activities.

Course Number: MGBU 3223 PW1, CRN: 10008
Instructor: D'Agustino
3 credits


Philosophical Ethics
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

Exploration of diverse approaches to the understanding of morality, including the study of value and obligations, the good and happiness, right and duty.

Course Number: PHIL 3000 PW1, CLOSED
Instructor: Metzger
3 credits


Introduction to Sociology
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

An introduction to sociology with a focus on its nature as a scientific discipline. The analysis of society through the use of sociological theories, concepts, and methods. This course serves as a prerequisite to all other sociology courses and seeks to stimulate students to continue to deepen their understanding of societies.

Course Number: SOCI 1100 PW1, CRN: 10003
Instructor: Kurti
3 credits


Approaches to Literature
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

A basic course in Spanish literature. Close readings in the major forms - prose fiction, poetry, and drama - and an introduction to the varieties of critical strategies for reading them.

Course Number: SPAN 2500 PW1, CRN: 10015
Instructor: Lehman
4 credits


Faith and Critical Reason
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

An introductory theology course designed to acquaint students with the analytical study of religion and religious experience and to provide critical categories for evaluating the history of theological discourse. The academic study of some of the forms, concepts, experiences and theological formulations found in Christianity and other traditions will be introduced.

Course Number: THEO 1000 PW1, CRN: 10016
Instructor: Alexander
3 credits


Christ in World Cultures
Session III, May 30-August 8, 2017
Online

At the center of the Christian tradition stands the person of Jesus Christ. Yet, from a global perspective, Christianity takes many forms in its many contexts. This course examines the ways in which the Christian faith interacts with diverse world cultures and asks the central question: how do cultural differences shape contemporary interpretations of Jesus as the Christ?

Course Number: THEO 3610 PW1, CLOSED
Instructor: Abrahamson
3 credits