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Urban Studies Summer Courses

Classes listed as "online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during a portion of their scheduled meeting times with additional coursework to be completed asynchronously. Session III online courses are all asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus; however, the university will continue to implement the Flexible Hybrid Learning Environment to keep the community safe and allow for the possibility of remote attendance as necessary.


Fordham students please check courses in my.fordham.edu for the most accurate Attribute listings.

ECON 3971 PW1 - Urban Economics
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

Urban Economics is the study of location choices by firms and households. The technological changes and economic factors driving the process of urbanization, and the shift from a "downtown"-centered city to the suburbanized metropolises prevalent in the U.S. today is the central focus of the course. Throughout the course, New York City's history and current situation are used as examples of the economic forces operating on cities. Students will participate in a group project to analyze a major urban problem such as housing affordability, poverty, crime, or education.

Closed
Instructor: Sun
4 credits


HIST 3950 R21 - Latino History
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, sexuality, and citizenship. Specific topics include: United States colonial expansion and its effects on the population of Latin America; Mexican-Americans, and the making of the West; colonialism and the Puerto Rican Diaspora; Caribbean revolutions and the Cuban-American community; and globalization and recent Latina/o migrations (Dominicans, Colombians).Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits


PSYC 2600 PW1 - Social Psychology
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

An examination of how others shape an individual's behavior. A review of selected topics of interpersonal behavior, including antisocial and prosocial behavior, prejudice, attraction, social influence, attitudes and persuasion, research methods.

Closed
Instructor: Sose Selimotic
4 credits


PSYC 2600 L21 - Social Psychology
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

An examination of how others shape an individual's behavior. A review of selected topics of interpersonal behavior, including antisocial and prosocial behavior, prejudice, attraction, social influence, attitudes and persuasion, research methods.

CRN: 12738
Instructor: Versey
4 credits


PSYC 3600 L11 - Multicultural Psychology
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

The focus of this course is the multicultural applicability of scientific and professional psychology. Traditional psychological theories, scientific psychology, psychological tests, and the practice of psychology will be examined and critiqued from cultural and socio-historical perspectives. Contemporary psychological theories and research specific to men, women, gay men, lesbians, and race/ethnicity will be reviewed.

Closed
Instructor: Cisse
4 credits


SOCI 2420 R11 - Social Problems Race Ethnicity
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course explores the historical and contemporary issues surrounding the impact that race and ethnicity have in society. Students will examine how racial and ethnic criteria often guide important economic, political, and social decisions that affect access to resources by various groups and which usually have major consequences for the individual. Fulfills the Pluralism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 12786
Instructor: Quinn
4 credits


SOCI 2925 R21 - Media Crime Sex Violence
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Turn on the television set, pick up the local newspaper, go on the Internet or watch a movie. Wherever you turn, you will find the media-saturated with stories about corrupt cops and honest cops, drug dealers and drug users, murderers and victims, organized crime and serial killers, crusading district attorneys and defense attorneys, corrupt lawyers and hanging judges, violent prisoners and convicted innocents. How accurate are these representations? What are the ideological messages and cultural values these stories communicate? In this course, you will learn how to demystify media representations in order to understand how and why they are produced, and who is responsible for their production.

CRN: 12756
Instructor: Wormser
4 credits


SOCI 2960 L11 - Popular Culture
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course will investigate the nature of contemporary popular culture. How do people spend their "spare time"? Does this vary with social class? Is sport the new religion? And how does this differ from that of earlier periods and simpler societies?

Closed
Instructor: McGee
4 credits


SOCI 3406 R11 - Race/Social Construct
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course concerns the evolution of racial typologies and classification system in the U.S. We will draw on a variety of texts from natural and social sciences, law, and literature to examine how "scientific" typologies of race are actually more reflective of power dynamics and social hierarchies than biological or genetic differences. Our goal is to understand the continuing significance of race in terms of social and economic power, as well and individual self-conceptualizations and identity politics.

CRN: 12796
Instructor: Valle
4 credits


SOCI 3713 L21 - Criminology
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course surveys the state of knowledge and theories explaining criminal behavior and attempts to control it by society. Although the sociological perspective on crime is emphasized, class discussion and the text attempt to examine the subject from a multidisciplinary point of view, especially with respect to legal, biological, and psychological views of crime.

CRN: 12758
Instructor: Adam
4 credits


VART 1101 L11 - Urbanism
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

A historical introduction to the issues, principles and processes of urban design in western societies. Lectures will trace the evolution of selected cities (from ancient Athens to contemporary Los Angeles) taking into consideration the design decisions that have affected our built environment and urban culture. Field Trips. (Satisfies Fine Arts core requirement).

CRN: 12526
Instructor: Cordes
3 credits


VART 1101 R11 - Urbanism
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: MTW, 9 a.m.-Noon

A historical introduction to the issues, principles and processes of urban design in western societies. Lectures will trace the evolution of selected cities (from ancient Athens to contemporary Los Angeles) taking into consideration the design decisions that have affected our built environment and urban culture. Field Trips. (Satisfies Fine Arts core requirement).

Closed
Instructor: Jainchill
3 credits


VART 1101 L21 - Urbanism
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

A historical introduction to the issues, principles and processes of urban design in western societies. Lectures will trace the evolution of selected cities (from ancient Athens to contemporary Los Angeles) taking into consideration the design decisions that have affected our built environment and urban culture. Field Trips. (Satisfies Fine Arts core requirement).

CRN: 12551
Instructor: Cordes
3 credits


VART 1101 R21 - Urbanism
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Rose Hill, Hybrid: MTW, 9 a.m.-Noon

A historical introduction to the issues, principles and processes of urban design in western societies. Lectures will trace the evolution of selected cities (from ancient Athens to contemporary Los Angeles) taking into consideration the design decisions that have affected our built environment and urban culture. Field Trips. (Satisfies Fine Arts core requirement).

CRN: 12550
Instructor: Jainchill
3 credits