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History Summer Courses

Classes listed as "online" during Session I or II will meet synchronously online during a portion of their scheduled meeting times with additional coursework to be completed asynchronously. Session III online courses are all asynchronous (exceptions are noted in course descriptions).

Hybrid courses will meet in person on campus; however, the university will continue to implement the Flexible Hybrid Learning Environment to keep the community safe and allow for the possibility of remote attendance as necessary.


Fordham students please check courses in my.fordham.edu for the most accurate Attribute listings.

HIST 1000 PW1 - Understanding Historical Change: Modern Europe
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and the examination of specific topics essential for understanding the evolution of modern institutions, ideologies, and political situations.

Closed
Instructor: Gauthier
3 credits


HIST 1000 L21 - Understanding Historical Change: Modern Europe
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and the examination of specific topics essential for understanding the evolution of modern institutions, ideologies, and political situations.

CRN: 12643
Instructor: Beer
3 credits


HIST 1075 L11 - Understanding Historical Change: Renaissance to Revolution
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: TTh, 1-4 p.m.

Understanding Historical Change: in early modern Europe involves a modular and comparative approach to events and issues significant to the history of Europe from approximately 1500 to 1800. The course will examine a range of events stretching from Columbus's voyages to the rise of Napoleon, and issues including but not limited to religious change, state formation, intellectual development, and revolution.

CRN: 12679
Instructor: Maginn
3 credits


HIST 1100 L11 - Understanding Historical Change: U.S. History
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook. Fulfills the Pluralism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Dietrich
3 credits


HIST 1100 R11 - Understanding Historical Change: American HIstory
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook. Fulfills the EP1 and Pluralism requirements in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Acosta
3 credits


HIST 1100 R12 - Understanding Historical Change: U.S. History
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.

CRN: 12470
Instructor: Strecker
3 credits


HIST 1100 PW1 - Understanding Historical Change: U.S. History
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.

Closed
Instructor: Gauthier
3 credits


HIST 1100 L21 - Understanding Historical Change: U.S. History
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.

CRN: 12644
Instructor: Siegel
3 credits


HIST 1100 L22 - Understanding Historical Change: U.S. History
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.

CRN: 12647
Instructor: Sullivan
3 credits


HIST 1100 R21 - Understanding Historical Change: American History
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Introduction to the nature and methods of historical study and examination of specific topics focusing on significant periods in the development of the U.S. and considering them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system; and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook. Fulfills the EP1 and Pluralism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Acosta
3 credits


CLAS 1210 PW1 - Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Greece
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

A political, social, and intellectual history of ancient Greece from its origin to the death of Alexander the Great.

Closed
Instructor: Foster
3 credits


CLAS 1220 R21 - Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Rome
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online, TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Introduction to Roman History focusing on problems and sources.

CRN: 12791
Instructor: Keil
3 credits


HIST 1551 L11 - Understanding Historical Change: Representing China and the West
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

By focusing on the representations of China in the West and of "the West" in China, this course examines how people identify and understand others, how people establish themselves as authoritative cultural mediators, and what the representations people produce tell us about history.

Closed
Instructor: Shen
3 credits


HIST 3364 L21 - Environmental History of the Atlantic World, 1250-1650
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Contemporary climate change has driven home the capacity of human societies to shape and be shaped by our environments. We are not, however, the first people to rely on fragile relationships with an ever-changing natural world. From the sequence of floods, famines, and human and animal diseases which struck Europe in the fourteenth century, linked to a minor fluctuation in global temperature, to the catastrophic transformation of American ecologies and societies with the arrival of Old World species, such relationships have defined our past. This course will explore the interactions between humans and their environment around the Atlantic basin, from the first faltering of the Medieval Warm Period in the thirteenth century, through the establishment of permanent European colonies on the North American mainland, exploring how societies were affected by changing environmental conditions, and how they tried to understand, adapt to, and shape those conditions in turn.

CRN: 12691
Instructor: Hrynick
4 credits


HIST 3430 L11 - World of Queen Elizabeth
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Lincoln Center, Hybrid: TTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course explores the world of Queen Elizabeth, the last Tudor sovereign, by looking at four overlapping themes that together shaped the Elizabethan period: state and society in the kingdom of England; overseas discovery; European diplomacy; and the kingdom of Ireland. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Maginn
4 credits


HIST 3515 L11 - Media History: From Google to Gutenberg
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This EP seminar will examine the evolution of media and the revolutions brought by new modes of communication, from the printing press in the 15th century to radio, television, and the internet most recently. The book and audiovisual media have been major forces in history; we will examine the profound impact they have on culture, ideas, politics, society, and economy. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 12471
Instructor: Rigogne
4 credits


HIST 3657 R31 - American Constitution (PCS only)
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online,
Sundays  9-11 a.m.: June 6, June 13, June 20, June 27
Presentation day will be Sunday, July 11 from 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

The U.S. Constitution is one of the extraordinary codes of law in history, the culmination of the development of liberty within a self-governing republic, and the model for modern democratic government. Yet the course of its interpretation has been contentious and often divisive, revealing schisms between liberalism and conservatism, between citizenship and partisanship, in the quest for American identity. This course will focus on the principles of American constitutionalism--its evolution from the historical roots, the adoption of the Constitution, and its development in relation to legal, political and social changes in American history.

Closed
Instructor: Fein
4 credits


HIST 3867 L21 - U.S. History Through Television
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

This course is designed to explore the intersection of American history and the medium of television. A combined thematic and chronological approach will explore television and its historical consequences from the post-war dominance of three major networks, to the more diverse and fragmented cable era of the late 20th century. Various genres will be examined, including: news, scripted programming, advertising, and political campaigns. Through curated readings and video analysis, the course will explore several themes and questions, such as: how television programming has shaped the course of historical events and social/cultural/political movements; how scripted historically themed programming (series and made-for-TV films) can affect viewers’ knowledge and opinions of historical figures and events; and how TV programming can be used in the study of American history.

Closed
Instructor: McKenna
4 credits


HIST 3950 R21 - Latino History
Session II, July 6 - August 5, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, sexuality, and citizenship. Specific topics include: United States colonial expansion and its effects on the population of Latin America; Mexican-Americans, and the making of the West; colonialism and the Puerto Rican Diaspora; Caribbean revolutions and the Cuban-American community; and globalization and recent Latina/o migrations (Dominicans, Colombians).Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Closed
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits


HIST 3969 R11 - Latin America and The U.S.
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course will be a survey of the history of the Latin American policy of the United States and the impact of such policy on the Latin American countries. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 12472
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits


HIST 4009 L11 - Film, Fiction, and American Power
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Visual and written representations of American power have influenced, challenged, and even transformed U.S. relations in the world. With their capacity to reach millions, films and fiction do more than tell stories or entertain audiences. They also have the unparalleled means to shape values and beliefs, and to convey attitudes toward the nature and practice of American power. What sort of themes of international power did authors, screen-writers, and directors address in the twentieth century? What do these reflections on power reveal about American society, its politics, and its place in the world?

Closed
Instructor: Dietrich
4 credits


HIST 4104 L11 - Food and Drink in Modern Society
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Eating and drinking are basic human needs. But they are much more: they are also activities that in every culture and in every society, past and present, have been central to how individuals define themselves and interact with each other. During this interdisciplinary capstone seminar, we will use a variety of approaches to unravel the social meanings of food and drink, and of eating and drinking through time and space. During our meetings, we will study the history of specific foodstuffs and beverages, and we will examine how food and drinks have been consumed over time, not only in the home but also in public places. We will apply concepts, theories, and techniques developed in history, anthropology, sociology, literary studies, linguistics, philosophy, art history, and the sciences to “read,” that is, to contextualize and interpret, texts, documents, and images.

Closed
Instructor: Rigogne
4 credits


HIST 4308 L11 - Antisemitism
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

The history of anti-Jewish hostilities and their various manifestations from antiquity to the present. An examination of the theological, social, political, economic, and mythical elements of the hatred. Close readings of antisemitic texts to acquaint students with the full repertoire of antisemitic tropes: Jews as agents of cosmic evil and murderers of God, children of the Devil and followers of the Antichrist, money manipulators and usurpers of other peoples’ possessions, political connivers, and conspirators, sexual predators, social corrupters. A study of the encoding and transmission of these ideas and an exploration of their continued contemporary appeal.

CRN: 12616
Instructor: Ben-Atar
4 credits


HIST 5204 PW1 - Medieval Environmental History
Session III, June 1 - August 5, 2021
Online, Asynchronous

Graduate course. This seminar is intended to familiarize graduate students with current themes and trends in medieval environmental history. Weekly reading assignments comprise historical monographs and scholarly articles in English.

CRN: 12828  
Instructor: Bruce
4 credits


HIST 5566 R11 - Technology and Empire
Session I, June 1 - July 1, 2021
Online: MW, 1-4 p.m.

Graduate course. This course, "Science, Technology, and Imperialism," will explore the crucial relationship between science and imperialism, with a particular focus on European imperial expansion from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. Students will use a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to raise and reframe fundamental questions about the role of science and technology as "tools of empire". For example, the course will explore how the equation of European science and technology with "progress" depended to a large degree on European perceptions of the colonized. Using multiple viewpoints from Europe, Africa, and India, the course will provide a fresh and unique view on the history of Imperialism that will locate science and technology as fundamental to understanding such contested concepts as conquest, progress, and modernity.

CRN: 12475
Instructor: Siddiqi
4 credits