Skip to main content

History Summer Courses

HIST 1000 L21 - Understanding Historical Change: Modern Europe
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

Our focus will be on three critical eras: the Enlightenment and French Revolution; the first Industrial Revolution and Victorian culture; and 1914-45, the era of total war. We will consider how historians explain such events and we will discuss how pivotal individuals help determine the direction of history: Robespierre, Napoleon, Marx, Lenin, Stalin, Churchill, Hitler.

CRN: 10153
Instructor: Bristow
3 credits


HIST 1100 R11 - Understanding Historical Change: American History
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course focuses on significant periods in the development of the United States and considers them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.

CRN: 10154
Instructor: Acosta
3 credits


HIST 1100 PW1 - Understanding Historical Change: American History
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Online

This course focuses on significant periods in the development of the United States and considers them in the light of certain elements shaping that history. Among these elements are the constitutional and political system and the society's ideals, structure, economic policy, and world outlook.

CRN:  10310
Instructor: Gauthier
3 credits


 HIST 1220 R21 - Understanding Historical Change: Ancient Rome 

Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

Introduction to Roman history focusing on problems and sources.

CRN: 10304
Instructor: Keil
3 credits


HIST 3362 R21 - Crime and Punishment in Europe
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: hybrid TTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

The history of defining, prosecuting, and punishing transgressions, both religious and secular, in Europe, especially from 1500-1800. The course will focus on the development of so-called modern beliefs about crime and law. Fulfills the Advanced History requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN:
Instructor: Myers
4 credits


HIST 3430 L11 - World of Queen Elizabeth I
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: hybrid TTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course seeks to move beyond the standard biographical studies of Elizabeth I by exploring the world that the last Tudor sovereign inhabited. It will do so by looking at four overlapping themes, which, together, shaped the Elizabethan world (1558-1603): state and society in the kingdom of England; the politics and diplomacy of Reformation Europe; England's overseas discoveries; and the extension of Tudor rule in the kingdom of Ireland. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 10155
Instructor: Maginn
4 credits


HIST 3950 R21 - Latino History
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-Noon

This course explores the development of the Latina/o population in the U.S. by focusing on the questions of migration, race, ethnicity, labor, family, and citizenship. Fulfills the EP3, Pluralism, and Advanced History requirements in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 10157
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits


HIST 3968 R11 - Mexico
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course covers the history of Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. It underscores major events (such as the Spanish conquest, independence, and the revolution) and long historical periods like the colonial era, the turbulent 1800s, nation building in the 1900s, and U.S. -Mexico relations. It further seeks to explain how the colonial legacy, race, the state, and migrations have shaped Mexican culture and identify.

CRN: 10158
Instructor: Acosta
4 credits


HIST 3975 R11 - A History of the Caribbean: From Slave Ships to Cruise Ships
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Rose Hill: hybrid, 6-9 p.m.

This course will study the history of colonialism, slavery, emancipation, and nationalism in the Caribbean, using both primary sources and scholarly studies. The African and European backgrounds to Caribbean history will receive particular attention.

CRN: 10159
Instructor: Alcenat
4 credits


HIST 4104 L21 - Food and Drink in Modern Society
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh with weekly field trips, 6-9 p.m.

Eating and drinking are not only basic human needs, they can also be immensely pleasurable activities and over the centuries they have been central to how we define ourselves and interact with each other. During this interdisciplinary capstone seminar, we will use both historical and literary analysis to explore the very rich history, social practices, and cultural meanings of food and drink in the modern world between the 15th century Renaissance and the present day. We will study the evolution of specific foods and beverages, and we will examine how they have been consumed, not only in the home but also in public places, from the traditional banquets and taverns to the newer cafes and restaurants. Our sources will cover the full spectrum of texts and genres that literary scholars and historians use in their work. We will apply concepts, theories, and techniques developed in both history and literary studies to contextualize and interpret texts, documents, and images. By combining a variety of angles and disciplinary perspectives (including anthropology, sociology, and art history) students will get a fuller understanding of the place food and drink have occupied in our societies and how it has changed over time. Fulfills the ICC requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 10161
Instructor: Appels
4 credits


HIST 4308 L11 - Antisemitism
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

The history of anti-Jewish hostilities and their various manifestations from antiquity to the present. An examination of the theological, social, political, economic, and mythical elements of the hatred. Close readings of antisemitic texts to acquaint students with the full repertoire of antisemitic tropes: Jews as agents of cosmic evil and murderers of God, children of the Devil and followers of the Antichrist, money manipulators and usurpers of other peoples' possessions, political connivers and conspirators, sexual predators, social corrupters. A study of the encoding and transmission of these ideas and an exploration of their continued contemporary appeal. Fulfils the EP4/Values Seminar requirements in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 10166
Instructor: Ben-Atar
4 credits


HIST 5420 R21 - Sin, Sex, Crime
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: hybrid TTh , 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. Sin and forgiveness were at the heart of the Christian message. In European tradition, sin and crime were closely related. This course examines the history of sin and crime from ancient Christianity to the present, focusing on the rise of sexual derelicts. Seniors may register with permission from department and class dean.

CRN: 10168
Instructor: Myers
4 credits