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Computer and Information Science Summer Courses

CISC 1400 L11 - Discrete Structures
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course covers basic materials in the discrete structure and algorithms which are used in computing science, information technology, and telecommunications. Topics include sets, permutation/combinations, functions/relations/graphs, sum/limit/partition, logic and induction, recursion/recurrence relation, system of equations and matrices, graphs/digraphs/networks, searching and sorting algorithms, database structure and data analysis. Practical examples of applications will be shown and programming will be used to reinforce understanding of the concepts.

CRN: 10293
Instructor: Werschulz
4 credits


CISC 1600 L11 - Computer Science I
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

An introduction to computer problem-solving methods, algorithm development, and computing concepts using a high-level programming language. Emphasis will be placed on program design, coding, debugging and documentation of programs. This course, together with CISC 1100: Structures of Computer Science, serves as the introduction to the computer science and the information science majors.

CRN: 10294
Instructor: Wei
3 credits


CISC 1600 R21 - Computer Science I
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Rose Hill: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

An introduction to computer problem-solving methods, algorithm development, and computing concepts using a high-level programming language. Emphasis will be placed on program design, coding, debugging and documentation of programs. This course, together with CISC 1100: Structures of Computer Science, serves as the introduction to the computer science and the information science majors.

CRN: 10306
Instructor: Lyons
3 credits


CISC 1800 L21 - Introduction to Computer Programming
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course introduces students to the foundational knowledge in computing and programming via a scripting language such as Python. This course covers the following topics: principles of computing, control structures, functions, recursion, file systems, web applications, and object-oriented programming. The students will learn how to apply computing concepts, structures, and algorithms to solve real world problems.

CRN: 10307
Instructor: Strzemecki
3 credits


CISC 3300 R11 - Internet and Web Programming
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1-4 p.m.

This course covers web programming in the Internet and interactive environment. Students will gain understanding of operating system usage on a server and ingteractive web system design. Languages used include PERL, HTML, CGI, and JAVA script.

CRN: 10295
Instructor: Staff
4 credits


CISC 3580 L11 - Cybersecurity and Applications
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, TBA

This course provides an introduction to cybersecurity concepts, technologies, and related applications. It covers cybersecurity basics, pubic and private key cryptosystems, access control, firewalls, security protocols, malware detection, cyber attacks, and related topics.

CRN: 10296
Instructor: Han
4 credits


CISC 4750 L21 - Scientific Computation using MATLAB
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

A course in programming in MATLAB, including input and output of data, algebraic and logical expressions, matrix operations, decisions and loops, scripts and function m-files, graphics and plots. Applications to solution of scientific and engineering problems will include solutions of systems of linear equations, numerical integration and differentiation, curve fitting, and root finding. Fulfills the EP3 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 10308
Instructor: Strzemecki
4 credits


CISC 4800 L11 - Project and Internship
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6-9 p.m.

Students will work in teams on large projects selected from practical problems in the public or private sector. Students also gain on-job experience by working as interns in the field of computer science and information technology. Students should obtain internship prior to beginning class.

CRN: 10297
Instructor: Wei
4 credits


CISC 5380 L21 - Introduction to Computer Programming
Session II, July 2-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: MW, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. This course aims to equip students with fundamental problem-solving skills and program implementation using Python. Topics covered include: principles of programming, like systems, control structure, functions, recursion, sorting, web and web search, etc. Students will work on large programming projects and present them in class. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

CRN:
Instructor: Strzemecki
3 credits


CISC 5550 L03 - Cloud Computing
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: Su (6/2, 6/9, 6/16, 6/23, 6/30, 7/14, 7/21), 2-6:30 p.m.

Graduate course. This course provides the needed knowledge to understand the technologies and services that enable cloud computing, discuss different types of cloud commutation models and investigate security and legal issues associated with cloud computing. Topics include Cloud infrastructure components and the interfaces; Essential Characteristics of Cloud Platform; Common Deployment Modes; Techniques for deploying and scaling cloud resources; and Security implication of cloud resources. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

CRN:
Instructor: Bhuiyan
3 credits


CISC 5900 L11 - Information Fusion
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: MW, 6-9 p.m.

Graduate course. A study of the structure and function of information fusion. Efficient and effective combination of data or information from a variety of diverse sources, sensors, features, and decisions. Applications and case studies of information fusion and decision making to a plethora of disciplines including science and engineering, cybersecurity and digital networks, medicine and health, social choices and human cognition, business and finance, and management and innovation. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

CRN:
Instructor: Hsu
3 credits


CISC 6081 L31 - Data Analytic Practicum
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TBA

Graduate course. This course is for students who desire experience in applying the knowledge and skills acquired in their course work and laboratory sessions. Students are responsible for arranging a practicum/internship with a business or organization that is related to data analytics. Graduate students only.

CRN:
Instructor: Staff
3 credits


CISC 6090 L11 - Capstone Project in Cybersecurity
Session I, May 28-June 27, 2019
Lincoln Center: Su (6/2, 6/9, 6/16, 6/23, 6/30, 1-5 p.m.

Graduate course. The goal of this class is to sharpen students' skill in Cybersecurity by designing and implementing a capstone project. After this class, students should gain a deep understanding in start-of-the-art cybersecurity, technologies, and knowledge. Students are required to finish a capstone project and are expected to present and write one or more research papers. Graduate students only.

CRN:
Instructor: Staff
3 credits


CISC 6091 L31 - Cybersecurity Practicum
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TBA

Graduate course. This course is for students who desire experience in applying the knowledge and skills acquired in their course work and laboratory sessions. Students are responsible for arranging a practicum/internship with a business or organization that is related to cybersecurity. Graduate students only.

CRN:
Instructor: Staff
3 credits


CISC 6095 L31 - Master Thesis in Cybersecurity I
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TBA

Graduate course. Exceptional students may choose to write a master's thesis. The thesis topic must be approved by the Department Graduate Committee. The work should adequately demonstrate the student's proficiency in the subject material. A thesis supervisor will be assigned by the department and an oral defense is required.

CRN:
Instructor: Staff
3 credits


CISC 6630 L03 - Wireless Security
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: S (6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29, 7/13, 7/20, 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Graduate course. The goal of this course is to provide students a theoretical foundation and robust technical details in wireless security. It covers topics in wireless network basics, principles of wireless network attacks, wireless intrusion detection systems, deploying wireless networks, defense for securing wireless networks, malwares in wireless networks, Rogue wireless network detection, cloud-based wireless solutions, and related techniques. Graduate students only.

CRN:
Instructor: Candeias
3 credits


CISC 6640 L03 - Privacy and Security in Big Data
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: Su (6/2, 6/9, 6/16, 6/23, 6/30, 7/14, 7/21), 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m.

Graduate course. This course targets the security and privacy issues associated with systems that process and store large amounts of data. The main concern is to process this data in a timely manner without compromising security and privacy of the users. Real world examples will be studied and analyzed to enable students to apply the suitable technological tools and techniques to protect the system and evaluate the suggested solutions. Covered topics include access control mechanisms, privacy protocol and methods, data confidentiality and integrity, security challenges and attacks on big data systems. Graduate students only.

CRN:
Instructor: Bhuiyan
3 credits


CISC 6800 L03 - Malware and Software Security
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: S (6/1, 6/8, 6/15, 6/22, 6/29, 7/13, 7/20), 2-6:30 p.m.

Graduate course. This course is the introduction to the fields of malware analytics and software security at the early graduate level. It covers one of the most important aspects of cybersecurity - the software perspective of the issue. It approaches the issue from mainly two ends, namely analyzing malicious software, which is intended to compromise the security requirements, and the software development strategies and tactics to prevent vulnerability in the face of attacks. This course will have enough technical details in exemplary scenarios for the students to dissect real world problems, but the main purpose is to establish enough theoretical and background knowledge so that they know where to start an endeavor and how to make an effective investigation or design for new software security problems. Graduate students only.

CRN:
Instructor: Bhuiyan
3 credits


CISC 6880 L03 - Block Chain Technology
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: F (5/31, 6/7, 6/14, 6/21, 6/28, 7/12, 7/19), 6-10:30 p.m.

A blockchain consists of participants who generate transactions, miners who aggregate the transactions and forge blocks of the chain, and the blockchain itself. The blockchain is updated based on some algorithm predetermine by group consensus, and it acts as a decentralized, immutable database. This course will cover fundamentals and advanced topics in blockchain technology. We will discuss each component in a blockchain system, how the components interact, and the general structure and functions of a blockchain. The course will also discuss security mechanisms of blockchain, blockchain system design, blockchain applicaitons and implementations, cryptocurrencies, smart contracts, and the challenges of blockchain.

CRN: 10325
Instructor: Staff
3 credits

 


CISC 6930 L31 - Data Mining
Session III, May 28-August 6, 2019
Lincoln Center: TBA

Graduate course. This course covers methods, algorithms, and applications of data mining. Topics include: representation, measurement, and visualization of data; analysis of large data sets using information fusion and statistical combinatorial, and computational techniques; data mining algorithms and models (e.g. decision trees, neural networks, associative rules, support vector machines, machine learning, and genetic algorithms); descriptive versus predictive modeling; and management of large diversified database systems. Applications are drawn from a variety of areas including information retrieval, market analysis and CRM, e-commerce, financial computing, economic forecasting, social choices, security and safety analysis, bioinformatics, and virtual screening for drug discovery and development. Graduate students only.

CRN:
Instructor: Staff
3 credits