Economics Summer Courses

Basic Macroeconomics
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Investment, GDP, interest rates, the budget deficit, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, and exchange rates appear frequently in the media but are often little understood. Macroeconomics studies these aggregates and their inter-connection and looks as well at the influence of the Federal Reserve and the government. Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 1100 L11, CRN: 10104
Instructor: Viegi
3 credits


Basic Macroeconomics
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Investment, GDP, interest rates, the budget deficit, inflation, unemployment, banking, monetary and fiscal policies, and exchange rates appear frequently in the media but are often little understood. Macroeconomics studies these aggregates and their inter-connection and looks as well at the influence of the Federal Reserve and the government. Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 1100 R21, CRN: 10203
Instructor: Kintanar
3 credits


Basic Microeconomics
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Microeconomics studies the decisions and interaction of consumers and businesses, resulting in an understanding of the process by which prices and quantities are determined in a market setting. Forms of industrial organization such as competition, monopoly, and oligopoly are explored. Also studied are the markets for labor and other factors of production. Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 1200 R11, CRN: 10052
Instructor: Tassier
3 credits


Basic Microeconomics
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Microeconomics studies the decisions and interaction of consumers and businesses, resulting in an understanding of the process by which prices and quantities are determined in a market setting. Forms of industrial organization such as competition, monopoly, and oligopoly are explored. Also studied are the markets for labor and other factors of production. 

Course Number: ECON 1200 L21, CRN: 10280
Instructor: Metzger
3 credits


Statistics I
Session III, May 30 - August 8, 2017
Online

The primary objective of this course is to develop an understanding of elementary statistical theories and concepts. This course has a prerequisite of one semester of Calculus and/or Finite Mathematics. The examples used throughout the lectures will be geared toward economic and business thinking. Fordham students (FCRH, FCLC, GSB) should refer to the registration policies for more information. Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 2140 PW1, CRN: 10005
Instructor: Migliaccio
4 credits


Statistics I
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

The primary objective of this course is to develop an understanding of elementary statistical theories and concepts. This course has a prerequisite of one semester of Calculus and/or Finite Mathematics. The examples used throughout the lectures will be geared toward economic and business thinking. Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 2140 R11, CRN: 10051
Instructor: Themeli
4 credits


Statistical Decision Making
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This computer-assisted course develops the student's ability to collect data, postulate a hypothesis or a model, select the appropriate statistical technique, analyze the data using statistical software, draw correct statistical inferences, and clearly summarize the findings. Specific topics include chi-squares, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression and correlation models, time series analysis, and quality control. (Prereq: Statistics I) Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 2142 L21, CRN: 10279
Instructor: Vali
4 credits


Statistical Decision Making
Session III, May 30 - August 8, 2017
Online

This computer-assisted course develops the student's ability to collect data, postulate a hypothesis or a model, select the appropriate statistical technique, analyze the data using statistical software, draw correct statistical inferences, and clearly summarize the findings. Specific topics include chi-squares, analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression and correlation models, time series analysis, and quality control. Fordham students (FCRH, FCLC, GSB) should refer to the registration policies for more information. (Prereq: Statistics I) Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 2142 PW1, CRN: 10006
Instructor: Burke
4 credits


Comparative Economic Systems
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Survey of the salient features of alternative economic systems; the mixed economies of the Western world and Japan; the reforms in the former Soviet, Eastern European, and Chinese economies; and problems of measuring economic performance. Fulfills the Globalism requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 3256 R11, CRN: 10053
Instructor: Santangelo
4 credits


Law and Economics
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Economic analysis of law is one of the fastest growing and most influential areas of both economic and legal scholarship. This course is of value to both the general economist and students planning to attend law school. This course applies microeconomic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contract, property, tort and criminal law. The approach applies the 'rational choice' framework used in economics to analyze the purpose, effect, and genesis of laws. Attention is paid to the effect of legal structures on economic efficiency. Fulfills the Advanced Social Science requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 3453 R21, CRN: 10202
Instructor: Themeli
4 credits


Economics at the Movies
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Films allow us to be transported to locations and times far, far away, in the name of entertainment. Sometimes those films inadvertently can teach us something about our economic system. This course will utilize film to illustrate the concepts that students encounter in economics. (Prereq: ECON 1200) Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 3666 R11, CRN: 10054
Instructor: Santangelo
4 credits


Stocks, Bonds, Options, and Futures
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This course examines the working of the primary and secondary markets, investment banking, brokers and dealers, the New York and American Stock Exchanges, the NASDAQ, and the options and futures markets. Fundamental and technical analysis are also covered. (Prereq: Macroeconomics) Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 3743 L11, CRN: 10105
Instructor: Vali
4 credits


Programming for Economics and Finance
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MW, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. This course introduces the student to various computer programs and their applications in economics and in finance. The course begins with a general review of programming skills using MATLAB. It then presents other statistical and econometric packages such as SAS and STATA. The course concludes with a review of the LATEK program. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

Course Number: ECON 5006 R11, CRN: 10151
Instructor: Rengifo
3 credits


African Economic Development
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: TTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. The key objective of this course is to develop an understanding of the economic development problems of Africa, the trade patterns and financial relationships of Africa to the rest of the world. With examples, application, and country case studies, the course covers major development challenges and the possible solutions, the growing influence of African economics in industrialized and developing countries as well as future prospects. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor. Syllabus

Course Number: ECON 5020 R21, CRN: 10262
Instructor: Themeli
3 credits


Economics of Transfer Pricing
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: MW, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. The reorganization of corporations into large multinational units with diverse operations has given renewed interest in the issue of transfer pricing of goods and services as they move between corporate units. Transfer pricing gives rise to a host of taxation and economic issues. In this course, we focus on economic models for transfer pricing using agency theory and game theory and discuss Hirshleifer's theories of corporate organization. We then discuss a variety of tax issues that arise under different pricing schemes and work through case studies to provide a well rounded perspective of how theory relates to practice. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

Course Number: ECON 5032 L21, CRN: 10267
Instructor: Staff
3 credits


Strategic Financial Management
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. An introduction to the basic questions facing an investor evaluating firm policy. The course covers debt/equity choice, dividend policy, and principle/agent problems within the firm. The value of the firm under different financial and managerial structures. Current research is surveyed to determine how investors interpret various financial arrangements such as dividend policy, taxes, and stock offerings. Specific attention will be paid to information and incentives of each party in a financial contract in the context of structuring the firm and running the firm efficiently. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

Course Number: ECON 5040 R11, CRN: 10150
Instructor: Rengifo
3 credits


Gender and Economic Development
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MW, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. The course draws on material from economics and other social sciences to analyze the social and economic nature of gender and economic development in a cross-cultural perspective. The class will be run as a discussion-based seminar. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

Course Number: ECON 5415 R11, CRN: 10153
Instructor: Combs
3 credits


Emerging Markets
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: MW, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. Analyzes emerging financial markets in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Students must prepare a study regarding one country's macroeconomic performance, foreign exchange market and stock market. Complements POSC 6911, Political Risk Analysis. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

Course Number: ECON 5540 R21, CRN: 10263
Instructor: Schwalbenberg
3 credits


GIS Mapping
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: MW, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. Students from a variety of disciplines get hands on experience mapping and analyzing large data sets using Stata and R. Student purchase Stata software, but total software and texts expenses for the course can be less than $200. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

Course Number: ECON 5740 L11, Cancelled
Instructor: McLeod
3 credits


Project Assessment: Philippines
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TBA

Uses the logical framework analysis frequently mandated by USAID to design a results based system to monitor and evaluate small community development projects.

Course Number: ECON 5771 R11, CRN: 10152
Instructor: Schwalbenberg
3 credits


Migration and Microfinance
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Migration, access to credit (microfinance) and remittances can create employment and education opportunities for poor families, particularly women. Interdisciplinary case studies from Mexico, the DR, the Bronx, Amsterdam, Nigeria, China, Bangladesh, and India show how race, class, and gender affect employment outcomes. This course is cross-listed with SOCI 5808 (CRN ).

Course Number: ECON 5808 L11, CRN: 10155
Instructor: McLeod
3 credits