English Summer Courses

Composition I
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

This first-year course provides instruction in how to generate and present a critical position in the college essay, with emphasis on the development of unity, coherence, and clarity of expression in written communication. We will also review basic grammar with emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems.

Course Number: ENGL 1101 R21, CRN: 10206
Instructor: Pinnix
3 credits


Composition I
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

This first-year course provides instruction in how to generate and present a critical position in the college essay, with emphasis on the development of unity, coherence, and clarity of expression in written communication. We will also review basic grammar with emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems. Syllabus

Course Number: ENGL 1101 R11, CRN: 10055
Instructor: Sottosanti
3 credits


Composition II
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis. Syllabus

Course Number: ENGL 1102 L11, CRN: 10108
Instructor: Stein
3 credits


Composition II
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

Course Number: ENGL 1102 R11, CRN: 10057
Instructor: Yun
3 credits


Composition II
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

Course Number: ENGL 1102 L21, CRN: 10281
Instructor: Lillo
3 credits


Composition II
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.Syllabus

Course Number: ENGL 1102 R21, CRN: 10204
Instructor: D'Onofrio
3 credits


Texts and Contexts: Remix
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m. - 12 p.m.

The newest art often relies heavily on art from the past, whether adapted, quoted or plagiarized. In this class, we will use T.S. Eliot's poem The Wasteland (1922) and Virginia Woolf's novel Mrs. Dalloway (1925) as anchor texts, studying their borrowings from Homer and Shakespeare as well as contemporary remixes of Woolf and Eliot by Toni Morrison, Allison Bechdel, and others. As part of the final project, you will make a remix of your own. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Syllabus

Course Number: ENGL 2000 L11, CRN: 10106
Instructor: Fernald
3 credits


Texts and Contexts: Self-Made Men and Women in 19th Century American Fiction
Session III, May 30 - August 8, 2017
Online

This course will focus on the evolution and cultural significance of the notion of "self-making" in nineteenth-century American literature. We will study the figure of the self-made mad through the writing of authors such as Horatio Alger, Frederick Douglass, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and William Dean Howells which also considering the prospect of self-made womanhood as articulated by authors including Emma May Buckingham, Louisa May Alcott, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps. Through close reading, analytical writing, and online discussion forms we will work together to develop an understanding of the relationship between self-making and nation-making and to investigate the role played by gender in the development of cultural ideals .Fordham students (FCRH, FCLC, GSB) should refer to the registration policies here for more information. Syllabus

Course Number: ENGL 2000 PW1, CRN: 10009
Instructor: Cosacchi
3 credits


Texts and Contexts: Writing, Resistance, and Revolution in American Literature
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This course explores a multicultural history of the technologies of "writing" in North America from 1776-2016. First, by focusing on four figures from early American history - Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Samson Occom, and Phillis Wheatley - we will consider how different people used writing to foment "revolutions". We will trace the revolutionary legacies of these four writers forward in time by reading texts as varied as Nathaniel Hawthorne's Blithedale Romance (1852), Charlotte Perkin Gilman's Herland (1915), Ishmael Reed's Flight to Canada (1976), and Suzanne Collins's The Hunger Games (2008-2010). Fulfills the EP 2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: ENGL 2000 L21, CRN: 10282
Instructor: Pottroff
3 credits


Texts and Contexts: Modernism and Cinema
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Nearly all modernist writers had in common a fascination with film. In the first half of this course we focus on four Hollywood film genres; the silent comedy, the musical, the western, and Film Noir, and place them within their literary, cinematic, and cultural contexts. In the second half of the course, we change our focus to Europe, exploring cinema as an art form that challenged and inspired modernist writers to think in new ways about the purposes and techniques of their craft. We will reach works such as Virginia Woolf's 1926 essay "The Cinema" alongside her novel The Waves, and T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land, which borrowed many cinematic techniques. Our goal throughout the course is to develop an understanding of the two-way creative traffic between cinematic and literary artists in the twentieth century. Fulfills the EP2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: ENGL 2000 R11, Closed
Instructor: Walsh
3 credits


Shakespeare
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Poetry and plays studied in relation to Renaissance and 20th-Century concerns and ideologies. Emphasis on Shakespeare and his works in relation to power, class, gender, and literary aesthetics. Fulfills the Advanced Literature requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Syllabus

Course Number: ENGL 3206 R11, CRN: 10058
Instructor: McEleney
4 credits


Islam and Italy
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

From Medieval Sicily to the Renaissance and the modern world, the involvement of Arab culture in Italy has been both varied and enduring in nature. This course examines the interaction between these two cultures from the 900s to today. Satisfies the Advanced Literature requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: MLAL 3210 L11, CRN: 10120
Instructor: Perricone
4 credits


American Modernism
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

In this course, we will be exploring texts produced by American writers between 1898 and 1945. Some of the thematic threads we will address include American expansionism, regionalism, the Harlem Renaissance, industrialization, and the fetishization of difficulty. Fulfills the Advanced Literature requirement in Fordham's core curriculum. Syllabus

Course Number: ENGL 3438 L11, CRN: 10107
Instructor: Sanchez
4 credits


Horror and Madness in Fiction and Film
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

How and why do we respond to horror, madness, and rage in film and literature? What are our reactions and responsibilities? Starting with the Alien series, the course moves to works by Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Toni Morrison, Virginia Woolf, Sigmund Freud, and Emmanuel Levinas, among others. Fulfills the Advanced Literature requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

Course Number: ENGL 3851 R21, CRN: 10205
Instructor: Gold
4 credits


African American Fiction
Session I, May 30 - June 29, 2017
Lincoln Center: MW, 1 - 4 p.m.

Graduate course. A study of twentieth and twenty-first century African American novels and short fiction. Open to seniors with a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better. Please consult your advisor.

Course Number: ENGL 5116 L11, CRN:
Instructor: Poulson-Bryant
3 credits


Film/Theory/Literature and Horror and Madness
Session II, July 5 - August 8, 2017
Rose Hill: TR, 6 - 9 p.m.

Graduate course. Confronting the expansive theoretical, literary, and cinematic representations of fear, horror, terror, abjection and madness, we will delve into works of David Cronenberg, George Romero, Stanley Kubrick, Steven Spielberg, Cynthia Freeland, and Julia Kristeva. Graduate students only.

Course Number: ENGL 6552 R21, CRN:
Instructor: Gold
3 credits