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English Summer Courses

ENGL 1101 R11 - Composition I
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This first-year course provides instruction in how to generate and present a critical position in the college essay, with emphasis on the development of unity, coherence, and clarity of expression in written communication. We will also review basic grammar with emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems.

CRN: 11289
Instructor: Light
3 credits


ENGL 1101 R21 - Composition I
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Rose Hill: TWTh, 9 a.m. - Noon

This first-year course provides instruction in how to generate and present a critical position in the college essay, with emphasis on the development of unity, coherence, and clarity of expression in written communication. We will also review basic grammar with emphasis on diagnosing and solving persistent problems.

CRN: 11265
Instructor: Yun
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L11 - Composition II
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 11291
Instructor: Fernald
3 credits


ENGL 1102 L21 - Composition II
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 9 a.m. - Noon

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 11268
Instructor: Marks-Watton
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R11 - Composition II
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 11299
Instructor: McEleney
3 credits


ENGL 1102 R21 - Composition II
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

Intensive training in the principles of effective expository writing, including attention to the techniques and the ethics of scholarly research. Students will write papers for discussion and analysis.

CRN: 11269
Instructor: Campbell
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L11 - Texts and Contexts: Oprah's Book Club
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Lincoln Center: TTh (hybrid), 9 a.m. - Noon

Since its inception in September 1996, Oprah's Book Club (OBC) has transformed the literary landscape -- from ushering in a new wave of enthusiastic readers and spiking the sale of books around the globe to reshaping the advertising and marketing of literature and offering readers strategies for engaging it. This level of success has allowed Oprah to accomplish one of her ultimate goals: to make her book club "the biggest book club in the work and get people reading again." This hybrid course will explore the phenomenon of OBC, thinking through its formation and rise as well as its strategies and approaches to literature. What methods does the book club employ to make literature accessible to a mass televised audience, and how does Oprah engage issues of race, gender, sexuality, and class with her readers and viewers? How does OBC serve as a litmus test for the ongoing debates between highbrow and middlebrow literary cultures? In what way does the book club figure Oprah as the arbiter of literary taste, and what kind of backlash does she receive as a Black female mogul? Why has OBC had such an enduring influence on the literary marketplace, and how does the club turn the private act of reading into something public and communal? We will tackle these matters and questions as we discuss secondary sources that map out various parts of OBC's trajectory and as we examine closely themes of racial beauty, sexual assault, racism, imprisonment, disability, and politics in OBC-selected texts, such as Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Ernest Gaines"s A Lesson Before Dying, and Michelle Obama's Becoming.

CRN: 11293
Instructor: Tyler
3 credits


ENGL 2000 L21 - Texts and Contexts: The Novel and Emotions
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Lincoln Center: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This course will focus on the emergence of the novel as a genre that described and taught us how to experience such emotions as wonder, terror, sympathy, and happiness. In addition to reading novels, we'll watch films and think about how they similarly take up the project of teaching us how to feel. What emotions do novels and films make available to us? What emotions do they discourage? Why are these works trying to regulate our emotions in the first place? We'll explore these and other questions as we read.

CRN: 11271
Instructor: Artan
3 credits


ENGL 2000 R11 - Texts and Contexts: Contemporary Literature
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Rose Hill: TWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This course will examine some major writers of contemporary fiction, with particular emphasis on writers of color. Authors may include Junot Diaz, Toni Morrison, Jhumpa Lahiri, David Henry Hwang, Young Jean Lee, and others. Writing instruction will be a major part of the course.

CRN: 11302
Instructor: Kim
3 credits


CLAS 2000 R21 - Texts and Contexts: Myths in Greco-Roman Literature Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Rose Hill: TWTh, 1 - 4 p.m.
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A survey of ancient myths from Greece and Rome via the literary works of Homer, Hesiod, Vergil, and Ovid. Major themes: creation, the hero, the journey, gods, and monsters. Fulfills the EP 2 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 11228
Instructor: Staff
3 credits


ENGL 2000 PW1 - Texts and Contexts: The Fashion System
Session III, May 26 - August 4, 2020
Online

In many great works of nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature, fashion isn't trivial at all -- r rather, fashion upsets conventional binaries of triviality and seriousness, private and public, art and commodity, feminine and masculine, social performance and individual expression. In this course, we'll examine works that are obsessed with fashion: with its cult codes and systems of meaning; its fetishistic power; its role in economics, politics, and social organization; and its subversive potential. Topics of study will include modernity and urbanism, capitalism and consumerism, colonialism and race, and gender and sexuality. As a 'Texts and Contexts' course, 'The Fashion System' will also focus on critical reading and writing, as students learn to think comparatively about works of literature.

CRN: 11415
Instructor: Enelow
3 credits


ENGL 2000 PW2 - Texts and Contexts: Winners and Losers in American Literature
Session III, May 26 - August 4, 2020
Online

This course examines the role and relevance of “winner” and “loser” as identities and concepts in American culture. We explore questions about what defines someone as a “winner” or a “loser” and the extent to which, and means by which, those labels can be revised or replaced. Through close reading, analytical writing, and online discussion forums we will work together to develop an understanding of the unique way that American culture reifies these identities as measures of an individual’s value and potential.

CRN: 11416
Instructor: Cosacchi
3 credits


ENGL 3342 L21 - Women, Crime, and Punishment in Literature
Session II, June 30 - August 4, 2020
Lincoln Center: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

This course examines portrayals of female criminality in literature. What formal techniques and narrative strategies do writers use to depict female criminality? What are the moral, legal, and social contexts that determine what constitutes a crime and the need for punishment? In addition to considering the literary representations, we will explore constructions of gender and sexuality and the ways in which social values and expectations shape agency and dis-empowerment.

CRN: 11273
Instructor: D'Onofrio
4 credits


ENGL 3650 L11 - Stayin' Alive: Performing Race and Ethnicity in 1970's U.S. Film and Literature
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Lincoln Center: MW (hybrid), 1 - 4 p.m.

Using film - Hollywood and Independent - as the primary texts, this course will introduce students to many of the debates surrounding the political and social climate of the U.S. in the 1970s marked by the increasing influence of identity politics., The Ethnic Revival, and black power. Using texts ranging from Shaft and The Godfather to Saturday Night Fever and Serpico, this interdisciplinary class will use film, media, and performance studies to consider the ways in which intersecting modes of identity develop and change across U.S. historical eras, particularly through the dissemination of media images. Ancillary reading will draw from autobiographies, journalism, history, and popular criticism.

CRN: 11294
Instructor: Poulson-Bryant
4 credits


ENGL 3842 R11 - The Short Story
Session I, May 26 - June 25, 2020
Rose Hill: MTWTh, 6 - 9 p.m.

A fun and rigorous romp through great short stories, such as those by Poe, Hemingway, Atwood, and O'Connor. We will read and discuss a range of fabulous short fiction to find out how such narratives work and how they challenge our expectations about ourselves and the world around us. Fulfills the Advanced Literature requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 11296
Instructor: Moshe
4 credits


ENGL 4403 PW1 - Extraordinary Bodies
Session III, May 26 - August 4, 2020
Online

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with non-normative bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bodies from a variety of personal and social perspectives. Fulfills the Values seminar/EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN: 11417
Instructor: Sanchez
4 credits


ENGL 4403 PW2 - Extraordinary Bodies
Session III, May 26 - August 4, 2020
Online

From freak shows to the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with non-normative bodies have received special, and not always welcome, attention from their peers. This course will study the experience of people with anomalous bodies from a variety of personal and social perspectives. Fulfills the Values seminar/EP4 requirement in Fordham's core curriculum.

CRN:
Instructor: Sanchez
4 credits